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Tourists

NEWS
August 25, 1997 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With a trident in one hand and a net in the other, Gianluca Zanna, who goes by the name of Spartacus and looks as if he just hopped off a Harley, glittered in black leather and silver studs as he winked at a few blond tourists and spoke of a gladiator's joy. Sure there were the financial squabbles with his partner, the breast-plated, perpetually sweating Mark Antony. Sure he jangled when he walked and his sandals gave him blisters. And, yes, British tourists were often chintzy with tips.
NEWS
September 2, 1991 | By Jodi Enda, Inquirer Staff Writer
It took a rotten economy, an overseas war and, perhaps, a wave of nostalgia to give back to the Jersey Shore this summer what trashy beaches and fouled water stole from it in summers past: tourists. Bearing beach chairs and sunscreen and surfboards, they came. In cars, on trains, in planes, they came. To boardwalks, casinos and nightclubs, they came. In droves, they came. Finally. For the first time since crack vials, tampons and AIDS-contaminated syringes washed ashore in 1988, the tourists came - flocked, actually - to the Jersey Shore, packing hotels, restaurants, beaches and roads.
NEWS
October 25, 1995 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
The carriage driver pulled her horse to a stop on Chestnut Street, pointed to the Second National Bank of the United States and described it as a fine example of "reefer Bible architecture. " "Reefer Bible architecture?" asked the bewildered tourist. The guide confirmed it was, indeed, a fine example of "reefer Bible architecture. " "Don't you mean 'Greek revival architecture?' " the tourist asked with a smile, obviously better informed than his "expert" guide. Each year thousands of tourists take these popular carriage rides down streets billed as "the Most Historic Square Mile in America.
NEWS
June 9, 1998 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Judy and Jules Lojeski of Blue Bell, Pa., stood here, amid some of the most spectacular scenery the country has to offer, and wondered for a moment if they were out of their minds for coming. To the east was the precariously balanced sombrero-shaped rock formation that gives this area its name. To the south, the movie-backdrop spires of Monument Valley pierced an impossibly blue sky. A thousand feet below, the San Juan River described a tortuous path between coppery cliffs. All of which paled beside the fact that two cop-killers are still on the loose, having eluded hundreds of law-enforcement officers for nearly two weeks now. "We were driving out here, and it's just so desolate," Jules Lojeski said, "and then Judy said to me: 'I hope those criminals aren't here.
NEWS
July 8, 2010 | By Troy Graham, Susan Snyder and David O’Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Sitting with his 9-year-old daughter and dozens of other tourists in a disabled duck-tour vehicle, bobbing helplessly in the Delaware River, Kevin Grace watched as the hulking barge loomed close, on a collision course. "We had 45 seconds to try to get the life jackets on our kids," he said Wednesday evening. Grace, a tourist from St. Louis, grabbed his daughter, but the next thing he knew, "it hit. " The crash capsized and sank the duck, a popular and ubiquitous Philadelphia tourist attraction, dumping 35 passengers and two crew members into the river near Penn's Landing.
NEWS
July 17, 2003 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wedged between Philadelphia and Atlantic City, South Jersey has generally been a pass-through, not a destination, for tourists and their precious dollars. Yesterday, the Delaware River Port Authority allocated $1.2 million to encourage visitors to linger and spend money in Burlington, Camden, Gloucester and Salem Counties. The grant launched South Jersey Tourism Corp., which will package and market lesser-known sites such as the Peter Mott House in Lawnside, the antiques shops of Mullica Hill, and the historic homes of Burlington City.
NEWS
May 4, 1993
At lunchtime yesterday, we hopped in a company Cavalier and pretended that we'd never been to Philadelphia before. Like a conventioneer, say, or a tourist from Iowa. Signage hasn't been one of this town's claims to fame - and we wanted to see how the Foundation for Architecture's campaign to change that has been going. Last summer, the foundation made a giant step, setting out - with the Streets Department's help - a series of handsome crimson Historic Area signs, complemented by detailed blue ones, pointing the way to the Liberty Bell, the elusive Elfreth's Alley, the Betsy Ross House et al. In recent days, the signs have more than doubled: There are about 140 out there today, approximately 75 percent of the total planned for Center City.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | By Doreen Carvajal and Karl Stark, Inquirer Staff Writers The Associated Press contributed to this report
Philadelphia may be on the brink of fiscal ruin, but the land of cheesesteaks and Ben Franklin is still the number-one tourist destination in Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania Magazine asked readers where in Pennsylvania they would want to go if they won a free, one-week family vacation. Finishing first with 600 votes were the historic sites of old Philadelphia, the magazine reported in its October issue. Coming in second was Pittsburgh's flashy new downtown, and the Poconos finished third.
NEWS
November 17, 1999 | by Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia will be throwing one heck of a house party next summer, when some 40,000 delegates, politicians, journalists and paparazzi show up for the 2000 Republican National Convention. Like any good host, the City of Brotherly Love is cleaning house in preparation for the weeklong convention. There's lots to do. Much of the city is frayed and grimy from neglect. The Daily News is asking readers to help the Philly Whip pinpoint problem areas that need shaping up before the July 29-Aug.
TRAVEL
March 11, 2012 | By Si Liberman, For The Inquirer
SOCHI, Russia - If he were alive today, Joseph Stalin wouldn't recognize the place. This subtropical Black Sea resort of nearly 350,000 residents at the foot of the snowcapped Caucasus Mountains is on the verge of becoming a major international destination since being designated the site of the 2014 Winter Olympics and the 2018 World Cup. More than 100 building projects are under way, as a capitalist fervor grips the city, fueled by...
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