CollectionsTourists
IN THE NEWS

Tourists

NEWS
February 4, 2013 | By Suzan Fraser, Associated Press
ANKARA, Turkey - Turkish police say a New York City woman who went missing and was later found dead in Istanbul had suffered a fatal blow to the head. Istanbul police chief Huseyin Capkin said Sunday that forensic experts had not concluded their autopsy report on the victim, Sarai Sierra, but that it was "clear" the head injury caused her death. NTV, a Turkish broadcaster, says 15 people have been detained for questioning in the case. Sierra, a 33-year-old mother of two, was last heard from on Jan. 21, the day she was to fly home from a vacation.
SPORTS
January 24, 2013 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Staff Writer
Google Delmon Young's name and, among the words that pop up next to it, are hate crime . Add the letter A after Young's name in the world's most popular search engine and you'll find the words arrested, anti-Semitic and assault on your screen. Young, 27, understands that's a big part of the reason he had to wait until Tuesday, just three weeks before the start of spring training, to sign a deal that guarantees him only $750,000. That's not that much money for a man with so much ability and a resume that includes being last year's AL Championship Series MVP. The Phillies are the team that will pay the notorious talent that money, and general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. accompanied the signing by saying that Young will get every opportunity to be the regular rightfielder.
NEWS
December 24, 2012 | By Lauren E. Bohn, Associated Press
BETHLEHEM, West Bank - Bethlehem's first female mayor, Vera Baboun, can't walk through the main square of the biblical town without being stopped by admirers. "This is our new mayor, who is turning Bethlehem into one of the greatest cities in the world!" a tour guide hollered to a group of Christian tourists passing by the Church of the Nativity, built over the grotto where tradition says Jesus was born. Starting with Christmas celebrations - the high point of the year in the town - Baboun is hoping to turn things around in the troubled city.
NEWS
November 28, 2012
A Philadelphia woman was indicted Tuesday by a New Jersey grand jury in the May stabbing deaths of two Canadian women in Atlantic City, Atlantic County Prosecutor Jim McClain said. Antoinette Pelzer, 44, of West Philadelphia, was charged with two counts of first-degree murder in the deaths of Po Lin Wan, 80, and Alice Mei See Leung, 47, on May 21. Pelzer approached the mother and daughter, who were visiting from Scarborough, Ontario, in the 1900 block of Pacific Avenue and attempted to rob them, McClain said.
NEWS
October 21, 2012 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Momentum is building to move three social-service providers away from Atlantic City's tourism district, where authorities say the homeless and drug-addicted populations they attract contradict the family-friendly image the resort is promoting. Prospective locations in the city have been identified for Sister Jean's Soup Kitchen and the John Brooks Recovery Center, a treatment facility and methadone clinic, officials said. The moves have been discussed for years, but a January deadline for a progress report to Gov. Christie has created new urgency, say those involved.
NEWS
October 11, 2012 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer
"THE BLACK Madam" offered two types of illegal booty enhancements - bubble butts and teardrops - but what the transgender gothic hip-hop artist gave to one British tourist was death, according to court testimony. The Black Madam, whose real name is Padge Victoria Windslowe, was held for court Wednesday following her preliminary hearing for murder and related offenses in the February 2011 death of Claudia Aderotimi, 20. Theresa Gymfi, 22, of London, England, testified about two trips she and Aderotimi made to Philadelphia to get silicone injections in their buttocks from Windslowe, 42, whom they knew only as "Lillian.
NEWS
October 9, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY - For this resort, struggling to keep gamblers - and their money - coming, May 21 was one of the worst days in years. That morning, two Canadian tourists, an 80-year-old woman and her daughter, 47, were knifed to death on a sidewalk across from one of the casinos, allegedly by a schizophrenic homeless woman from Philadelphia. The stabbings of Po Lin Wan and Alice Mei See Leung of Scarborough, Ontario, were among 15 homicides in the city so far this year, though they were the only two involving tourists.
NEWS
August 26, 2012 | By Jennifer Peltz, Associated Press
NEW YORK - New York officials proudly tout the Big Apple as the safest big city in America. But blasts of gunfire in front of crowds near some of the city's best-known destinations this month painted a picture at odds with its tame, tourist-friendly image. Police confronted a knife-wielding man in Times Square and then shot him to death a few blocks away Aug. 11 as onlookers followed along and snapped photos. And on Friday, a gunman with a workplace grudge shot a former co-worker dead outside the Empire State Building - and then was killed himself by police in a burst of bullets that left at least nine bystanders wounded, some apparently by police rounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2012 | the Daily News staff
IT MAY BE vacation season, but times are hard. Why blow a load of money traveling when you can stay home and play tourist in your own city? With so many attractions in Philadelphia, though, it can be hard to decide which ones are worth your time — and which ones are best left for conventioneers from Topeka. We've made it easy for you with this list of Daily News staff picks we think are worth a visit — even if you've lived here all of your life.   Float your boat The newly redesigned Sister Cities Park on Logan Square in front of the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul is little more than an acre, but it's jam-packed with fun. Watch kids frolic in the fountain, whose 10 jets of water shoot up from the ground.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | By Tracie Mauriello, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
GETTYSBURG - Tourists trickle through the Gettysburg Train Station's burgundy door, some to escape the heat, others to pick up battlefield maps. Only a few come to trace Lincoln's path through here to deliver the two-minute speech that defined the Civil War and began to reunify a nation. When Walter Powell walks through, his eyes don't register the racks of picked-over tourism brochures or the weary travelers resting achy feet on 150-year-old benches. Rather, he sees what the station could be: a bustling railroad museum that gives visitors a fuller picture of the Civil War and draws tourists to downtown businesses.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|