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NEWS
August 5, 2003 | By Bertha Polt Cutler
August. It's the month when my senses go into low gear. Everything that was once serious seems to become trivial. I don't question why, after 31 years, I am again singing "Bye, bye, Miss American Pie. " It's August, so why inquire about odd behavior? I've even committed larceny in my doctor's waiting room. It was a recipe for apricot-glazed chicken in one of his magazines. I had to have that recipe. I actually tore it out! No self-recrimination, though. It's August, and I am numb.
NEWS
May 30, 1996 | by Kitty Caparella and Joe O'Dowd, Daily News Staff Writers Staff writer Jack McGuire contributed to this report
If it wasn't one mob faction shaking Tony Video down, it was another. Anthony "Tony Video" Milicia, 76, co-owner of the M & P Vending Inc., couldn't catch a break. But the easygoing vending machine operator, also known as "Tony Machines," kept his lucrative business operating, in spite of the warring mobsters who wanted a piece of him in 1993-1994. Once crime boss John Stanfa's mobsters brazenly stole a few of his vending machines, loaded them in a Ryder truck and held them for ransom until he paid.
NEWS
August 3, 1993 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
It was another wash day at Trish O'Connell's. A sagging clothesline was strung from a couple of locust trees. On it were hanging blankets, diapers, and towels. Lots of towels. There also were teddy bears. They were hanging by the fuzz of their ears with clothespins. A few feet away, attached to a warped weather-beaten table, was an old hand wringer, the kind you see at a back-road lawn sale. To O'Connell it's a luxury. She just got outside running water a year and a half ago. Before that, she used buckets.
FOOD
June 16, 2011
    Jean Lee and Dylan Davis of Seattle create stainless steel utensils with polymer-coated handles inspired by the dipped ends of hand tools. These oversized servers are about 11 inches long; food and dishwasher safe. Superior Servers. $35 each at Ladiesandgentlemenstudio.com, 206-226-6296. - Dianna Marder Crispy chips Frankferd Farms, a family business in Saxonburg, Butler County, Pa., has a certified organic farm and flour mill where it makes, among other goodies, Tres Rios Blue Corn Chips, made with peanut and soybean oils, water, salt, a trace of lime, and nothing artificial.
LIVING
February 9, 1993 | By Mike Capuzzo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The grand Hotel Pennsylvania is a monument to that distant time when New Yorkers were polite and hardly any state was as important as Pennsylvania. Stanford White designed the "Biggest Hotel in the World" for the Pennsylvania Railroad in 1917 - across the street from Pennsylvania Station. Jimmy Dorsey got his start in the hotel's Cafe Rouge, and Glenn Miller sang "Pennsylvania 6-5000," still the hotel phone number. But the railroad is no more. Cafe Rouge is now an outlet store.
SPORTS
February 15, 2009 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Spain's Rafael Nadal beat Gael Monfils of France, 6-4, 6-4, yesterday, setting up a final against Britain's Andy Murray in the ABN Amro in Rotterdam, Netherlands. Murray overcame a slight injury to his right foot to rout two-time champion Mario Ancic of Croatia, 6-1, 6-1. Amelie Mauresmo of France defeated Jelena Jankovic of Serbia, 6-2, 0-6, 6-1, in the Open GDF Suez semifinals in Paris to set up a meeting with Elena Dementieva of Russia, who advanced after top-ranked Serena Williams withdrew because of a knee injury.
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
Antique furniture in America often suffers damage because of the environment, says a furniture restorer-conservator with a business in Bordentown. "Dramatic changes in temperature lift veneer and dry out glue," says Mark Reed, 36, who came to the United States in 1983 from Lincolnshire, England, where he had his own furniture and architectural restoration business. Reed offers some suggestions for the preservation of antiques: Dust furniture with good-quality paper towels.
FOOD
December 20, 1989 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: When it's raining or it looks like it's going to, carry an old raincoat or plastic tablecloth in your car. Take it into the grocery store with you, and when you're leaving the store, use it to cover the bags of groceries. Otherwise, you'll have wet bags whose bottoms fall out. This raincoat even helped me one day get a mother and baby to their car. Everyone I've told said this was the best idea yet. - M.M.G. Dear M.M.G.: This can be a real helper on wet days. Better yet, keep that old raincoat or tablecloth in your car all the time so you'll be ready for unexpected showers.
FOOD
June 22, 1988 | By POLLY FISHER, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Here is a recipe for blueberry syrup that is easy and delicious. Boil 1/2 cup sugar, 1 cup water and 1 tablespoon cornstarch until mixture is clear. Add 1/2 teaspoon each of cinnamon and nutmeg plus 1 teaspoon lemon juice and 2 cups blueberries. Bring to a boil and simmer until it begins to thicken. - Bertie Dear Bertie: Your delicious syrup is really enhanced by the cinnamon and nutmeg. This really makes a treat out of the common pancake! - Polly Dear Polly: Here's my way of keeping a set of bath linens looking nice and usable longer - with fewer mismatched pieces.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1986 | By ROBYN SCHAUFFELE SELVIN, Daily News Sales Columnist
The best way to describe the J.C. Penney "New York Sample Sale," held monthly in Audubon, N.J., is to call it an upscale garage sale. The merchandise - samples used by Penney's people to decide what goods the stores will and won't stock - is trucked down from the company's New York City headquarters and sold at huge discounts. The next sample sale, scheduled for this Friday and Saturday, will feature lamps, kitchen goods, domestics, some clothes and a large assortment of "miscellaneous goods.
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