FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 18, 1987 | By Patricia Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
Monroe Township Council members appointed an architect yesterday to study the location, cost and design for a new town hall. Officials said last night they wanted to move into new quarters that would be larger and more accessible to the town's residents. Municipal operations now operate out of five facilities, including the 58- year-old, three-story town hall on Main Street that houses the administrative offices and council chambers. "I think it is becoming evident that the existing town hall does not efficiently provide services to the public," said Township Administrator James White.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | By Patricia Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
Monroe Township residents will have an opportunity to voice their opinion about the construction of a proposed $3.8 million town hall tomorrow when the Township Council holds a public hearing on financing for the project. By a 6-1 vote Feb. 6, the council gave preliminary approval for a $3.6 bond issue to help finance the building, proposed for a site on Virginia Avenue adjacent to the police station. The 38,000-square-foot structure, designed by Kanalstein Timber Danton & Johns of Cherry Hill, at a cost of $162,000, would house township operations now based at the town hall and its annex, both on Main Street.
NEWS
April 1, 2011 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, INQUIRER POLITICS WRITER
President Obama will visit a Bucks County wind-turbine plant next Wednesday to highlight the administration's policy of diversifying the nation's energy sources and reducing reliance on imported oil, a White House official said Friday. The president plans to stop at Gamesa Technology Corp. in Fairless Hills, Pa., where he will hold a town-hall meeting with workers about building a clean-energy future for the 21st century. Gamesa employs about 300 people at the facility, built on the site of a former U.S. Steel factory, and manufactures turbines used in the generation of wind-powered electricity.
NEWS
December 20, 1987 | By Patricia Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
"Don't even think of parking here" reads the sign posted at the Town Hall parking spot of Monroe Township Mayor Carmen J. DiNovi Sr. Although the sign may seem to display authoritarian humor, the architect who recently completed a feasibility study for a new municipal complex said that it is a sign of overcrowding, both inside and outside township offices. The architect - Gary Kanalstein of Kanalstein, Timber, Danton, Johns, P.A. of Cherry Hill - presented the Monroe Township Council on Dec. 7 with a 200- plus-page report on studies his firm had made and recommendations for a new municipal complex.
NEWS
November 26, 2008 | By HARRIS SOKOLOFF
IT TAKES courage to be mayor, and more courage to lead public forums about budget decisions during tight and contentious times. The first of Mayor Nutter's town hall meetings on the budget was last night. I wasn't there, but I'm betting I know what happened: The mayor, with his budgetary leadership staff, presented their work, described what they've prioritized, what they've cut and why. They likely included some of the trade-offs they made and why they made them. Then a long line of citizens queued-up - physically or on 3-by-5 cards - to ask the mayor and his budget team "questions" to which they expect "answers.
NEWS
October 1, 1987 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
Madonna was there. So was Chuck Berry. Janet Jackson, Cyndi Lauper and even Alice Cooper made appearances. But in the end, it was Michael Jackson who stole the show. Why all the celebrities? Residents of Conshohocken are trying to save their borough hall, a nearly 100-year-old mansion at the corner of Eighth Avenue and Fayette Street. And they decided that a good way to raise money toward that end would be to throw a party and invite the hit-makers to belt out some of their hits.
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | By Judy Baehr, Special to The Inquirer Inquirer staff writer Charlie Frush contributed to this report
"I'm interested in light and shadow as well as color, and my photos are a lot like paintings," said Clarence Guienze of Cherry Hill, whose portrait of his grandmother, titled, "Roots Study - Big Mama #1," has been purchased by the township's Arts Advisory Board to hang in Town Hall as representative of local excellence in the arts. That Guienze's photographs are like paintings is not surprising. After graduating from Southern University and serving in the Army, he traveled to Seattle from his home state of Louisiana in 1954 to launch a career as a painter.
NEWS
September 10, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's Veterans Affairs Medical Center will host a town hall forum Wednesday, part of a continuing effort by the troubled agency to build back trust with the public. The event - open to patients, other veterans and community members - comes as the University City hospital is under scrutiny over its scheduling practices. The facility serves as the regional hub for more than 57,000 veterans from Southeastern Pennsylvania and Southern New Jersey. It is being reviewed by the VA Office of Inspector General after appointment schedulers told auditors in May they had been instructed to enter dates other than the ones requested by veterans, a tactic used to hide delays.
NEWS
May 8, 2011 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly four years after a fire doomed Moorestown's fortresslike town hall, the only thing agreed upon is that the vacant concrete structure will be demolished in a few weeks. Meanwhile, the government of the wealthy Burlington County community operates out of five locations, including hard-to-find industrial park offices that have no signs or American flags marking them as public offices. Twenty proposals have come and gone. Now a $19 million plan for an all-inclusive municipal center is being debated.
NEWS
January 18, 1989 | By Patricia Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
When Monroe Township officials met last week to discuss financing the proposed new town hall, they hoped to find enough money from grants or other sources to reduce the cost of the building to taxpayers from $3.8 million to $2.5 million. But the news was not good. Officials learned that no county or state funds were available for such a project. Moreover, they learned that what some thought was a $3.9 million budget surplus, which would be available to help pay for the building, was actually about $1 million less.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 15, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
More than a dozen residents of Cherry Hill's Kingston section rose before the Township Council meeting Monday evening, demanding to know if the town was secretly planning a new municipal building for Kings Highway, before Mayor Chuck Cahn assured them that the project was "not even at Stage One. " "We haven't even kicked the tires," he told the 50 residents who turned out for the meeting. When pressed by opponents of the rumored project, Cahn told them that "if the residents of Kingston don't want a municipal building in Kingston, we won't build it there.
NEWS
June 1, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
The out-of-the-blue knock on the door came on a Sunday afternoon in March, Carmen Argentina recalls. His wife, Sonia, was preparing pasta at their gracious Cherry Hill home. At the door was a pleasant real estate professional who said she was representing a buyer whose identity she could not disclose, but who was willing to pay cash. "She asked me, 'What would you want?' " Argentina, 80, says. "I told her, 'I'm not moving.' " However, the township may be interested in nearby land now occupied by two office buildings and at least two homes in the portion of the Kingston Estates neighborhood bounded by North Kings Highway, Daytona Avenue, Drake Terrace, and Queens Road.
NEWS
April 27, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, STAFF WRITER
Should Hillary Clinton all but clinch the Democratic nomination when the polls close Tuesday, she will not then bend over backwards, or even moderately it seems, by adopting any of her opponent Sen. Bernie Sanders' proposals to win over his base, she said Monday. "Let's look at where we are right now. . . . I am winning," Clinton told MSNBC's Rachel Maddow and a crowd of about 200 people gathered for a town hall at the National Constitution Center. "And I am winning because of what I stand for. " Sanders, in his own town hall before the same crowd but a different host, Chris Hayes, said Clinton would have to reconsider that stance if she is to win over those who have emphatically backed him as the anti-establishment candidate.
NEWS
April 25, 2016
With Tuesday's Pennsylvania primary hours away, some would-be presidents are heading to the Philadelphia area, striving for support and snarling traffic. Their public events: Republican Donald Trump has a rally at West Chester University's Hollinger Field House that starts at 4 p.m. Monday. His rival John Kasich is due at 10 a.m. Monday at the Penrose Diner in South Philadelphia. Democrats Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders will both hold events in Philadelphia and answer questions during MSNBC-hosted town halls at the National Constitution Center.
NEWS
April 24, 2016
Fox News anchors Bill Hemmer and Martha MacCallum will preview Tuesday's primaries from the National Constitution Center on Sunday, in a town hall with undecided voters from 8 to 10 p.m.
NEWS
April 15, 2016
THERE IS NO WAY to avoid sounding like a Donald Trump supporter with this column. I've already been accused of going over to the dark side by defending The Donald against accusations that he wanted to imprison women who had abortions, and that he cheered on a campaign manager prone to domestic violence. No matter how many times I made fun of his hair, his fish lips, his lack of tact and the fact that Dora the Explorer has a more nuanced take on immigration than he does, people still resented the fact that I could find any redeeming qualities in the man who has been compared to Hitler (lazy thinkers)
NEWS
February 8, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
MANCHESTER, N.H. - At times toward the end of last week, it seemed somebody had flipped a switch, and the hive mind of the Republican Party mainstream decided that Marco Rubio might be The One. With his third-place finish in the Iowa caucuses Monday, Rubio rolled into New Hampshire with that fickle but powerful force - momentum - and began to consolidate GOP establishment support in the drive to stop real estate entrepreneur Donald Trump and Texas...
NEWS
January 27, 2016
Obama: It's Clinton's pragmatism vs. Sanders' idealism. A2. Democrats make their pitches at CNN town hall. A2. Would Trump or Cruz hurt Toomey's reelection bid? A3.
NEWS
December 29, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Mayor-elect Jim Kenney deserves high marks for holding five town hall meetings on the future of the city before being sworn into office, and additional points for seeming genuinely interested in what people had to say. Of course, that makes sense. Philadelphians are experts on what they like and dislike. Just walk into a local pub, church hall, or recreation center and you're likely to get an earful. Kenney simply created a more formal setting for discourse. It's good for mayors, whether newly elected or long-time officeholders, to hear from more than other elected officials or some self-appointed community leader.
NEWS
December 23, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
HOLLIS, N.H. - As he fielded questions from New Hampshire voters Sunday night - summoning emotional stories about the days after Hurricane Sandy - Gov. Christie turned the floor over to another governor. "If you've got a tough decision to make, Chris Christie's the right guy. Some people don't realize what a loving, caring guy he is," Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan told the crowd at the Peterborough town hall. He then recounted advice Christie gave him during the recent Baltimore riots: "He told me to get up to Baltimore, show some leadership.
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