FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 18, 1987 | By Patricia Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
Monroe Township Council members appointed an architect yesterday to study the location, cost and design for a new town hall. Officials said last night they wanted to move into new quarters that would be larger and more accessible to the town's residents. Municipal operations now operate out of five facilities, including the 58- year-old, three-story town hall on Main Street that houses the administrative offices and council chambers. "I think it is becoming evident that the existing town hall does not efficiently provide services to the public," said Township Administrator James White.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | By Patricia Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
Monroe Township residents will have an opportunity to voice their opinion about the construction of a proposed $3.8 million town hall tomorrow when the Township Council holds a public hearing on financing for the project. By a 6-1 vote Feb. 6, the council gave preliminary approval for a $3.6 bond issue to help finance the building, proposed for a site on Virginia Avenue adjacent to the police station. The 38,000-square-foot structure, designed by Kanalstein Timber Danton & Johns of Cherry Hill, at a cost of $162,000, would house township operations now based at the town hall and its annex, both on Main Street.
NEWS
April 1, 2011 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, INQUIRER POLITICS WRITER
President Obama will visit a Bucks County wind-turbine plant next Wednesday to highlight the administration's policy of diversifying the nation's energy sources and reducing reliance on imported oil, a White House official said Friday. The president plans to stop at Gamesa Technology Corp. in Fairless Hills, Pa., where he will hold a town-hall meeting with workers about building a clean-energy future for the 21st century. Gamesa employs about 300 people at the facility, built on the site of a former U.S. Steel factory, and manufactures turbines used in the generation of wind-powered electricity.
NEWS
December 20, 1987 | By Patricia Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
"Don't even think of parking here" reads the sign posted at the Town Hall parking spot of Monroe Township Mayor Carmen J. DiNovi Sr. Although the sign may seem to display authoritarian humor, the architect who recently completed a feasibility study for a new municipal complex said that it is a sign of overcrowding, both inside and outside township offices. The architect - Gary Kanalstein of Kanalstein, Timber, Danton, Johns, P.A. of Cherry Hill - presented the Monroe Township Council on Dec. 7 with a 200- plus-page report on studies his firm had made and recommendations for a new municipal complex.
NEWS
November 26, 2008 | By HARRIS SOKOLOFF
IT TAKES courage to be mayor, and more courage to lead public forums about budget decisions during tight and contentious times. The first of Mayor Nutter's town hall meetings on the budget was last night. I wasn't there, but I'm betting I know what happened: The mayor, with his budgetary leadership staff, presented their work, described what they've prioritized, what they've cut and why. They likely included some of the trade-offs they made and why they made them. Then a long line of citizens queued-up - physically or on 3-by-5 cards - to ask the mayor and his budget team "questions" to which they expect "answers.
NEWS
October 1, 1987 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
Madonna was there. So was Chuck Berry. Janet Jackson, Cyndi Lauper and even Alice Cooper made appearances. But in the end, it was Michael Jackson who stole the show. Why all the celebrities? Residents of Conshohocken are trying to save their borough hall, a nearly 100-year-old mansion at the corner of Eighth Avenue and Fayette Street. And they decided that a good way to raise money toward that end would be to throw a party and invite the hit-makers to belt out some of their hits.
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | By Judy Baehr, Special to The Inquirer Inquirer staff writer Charlie Frush contributed to this report
"I'm interested in light and shadow as well as color, and my photos are a lot like paintings," said Clarence Guienze of Cherry Hill, whose portrait of his grandmother, titled, "Roots Study - Big Mama #1," has been purchased by the township's Arts Advisory Board to hang in Town Hall as representative of local excellence in the arts. That Guienze's photographs are like paintings is not surprising. After graduating from Southern University and serving in the Army, he traveled to Seattle from his home state of Louisiana in 1954 to launch a career as a painter.
NEWS
September 10, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's Veterans Affairs Medical Center will host a town hall forum Wednesday, part of a continuing effort by the troubled agency to build back trust with the public. The event - open to patients, other veterans and community members - comes as the University City hospital is under scrutiny over its scheduling practices. The facility serves as the regional hub for more than 57,000 veterans from Southeastern Pennsylvania and Southern New Jersey. It is being reviewed by the VA Office of Inspector General after appointment schedulers told auditors in May they had been instructed to enter dates other than the ones requested by veterans, a tactic used to hide delays.
NEWS
May 8, 2011 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly four years after a fire doomed Moorestown's fortresslike town hall, the only thing agreed upon is that the vacant concrete structure will be demolished in a few weeks. Meanwhile, the government of the wealthy Burlington County community operates out of five locations, including hard-to-find industrial park offices that have no signs or American flags marking them as public offices. Twenty proposals have come and gone. Now a $19 million plan for an all-inclusive municipal center is being debated.
NEWS
January 18, 1989 | By Patricia Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
When Monroe Township officials met last week to discuss financing the proposed new town hall, they hoped to find enough money from grants or other sources to reduce the cost of the building to taxpayers from $3.8 million to $2.5 million. But the news was not good. Officials learned that no county or state funds were available for such a project. Moreover, they learned that what some thought was a $3.9 million budget surplus, which would be available to help pay for the building, was actually about $1 million less.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 25, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a move that made defense lawyers protest, a Philadelphia judge on Thursday agreed to postpone until June 10 the trial of 10 people arrested in a melee at a March town-hall meeting attended by District Attorney Seth Williams and Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey. Municipal Court Judge Joyce O. Eubanks granted the request by Assistant District Attorney Pam Conner, who said she needed more time to prepare for the disorderly conduct trial. Conner said she was only recently notified of the nonjury trial's scheduling, and needed time to interview police and at least one civilian witness to the March 19 incident.
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Polls have cast a harsh light on his presidential chances, but Gov. Christie will try to win over early-primary state voters with a Jersey-tested tool: the town-hall meeting. Christie, who has held 134 such meetings in his home state, will hold two this week in New Hampshire, where he also plans to announce a national entitlement reform proposal. That subject dovetails with what Christie has framed at New Jersey town halls as confronting hard truths about the state's public worker pension system.
TRAVEL
March 9, 2015 | By Liz Dempsey, For The Inquirer
In the summer of 2010, with our 50th wedding anniversary approaching (in 2014), our four adult children said, "Let's all take a trip to Germany together and see where Mom and Dad were married (and lived for two years)!" Loving the suggestion and thinking this was way better than a party, we agreed it could be an amazing adventure. In 1964, my husband was an MP stationed just outside of Heidelberg, attached to U.S. Army Europe Headquarters. After months of planning, obtaining a passport, and purchasing a $303 one-way ticket, I flew to Frankfurt via London on a Pan Am 707 out of JFK Airport on a cold February evening.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Already under scrutiny by members of Congress and its own inspector general, Philadelphia's Veterans Affairs system is now drawing attention from another group: City Council. On Monday, a council committee will hold a hearing on the quality of care at the city's VA hospital and benefits office. The council has no purview over the federal agency. But Councilman David Oh, a National Guard veteran, said he received enough complaints about the troubled agency to warrant concern. "I didn't feel that it was something within my jurisdiction to handle, other than to listen to people," Oh said.
NEWS
September 10, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's Veterans Affairs Medical Center will host a town hall forum Wednesday, part of a continuing effort by the troubled agency to build back trust with the public. The event - open to patients, other veterans and community members - comes as the University City hospital is under scrutiny over its scheduling practices. The facility serves as the regional hub for more than 57,000 veterans from Southeastern Pennsylvania and Southern New Jersey. It is being reviewed by the VA Office of Inspector General after appointment schedulers told auditors in May they had been instructed to enter dates other than the ones requested by veterans, a tactic used to hide delays.
NEWS
August 23, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's Veterans Affairs benefits office will host two town hall events Wednesday for local veterans to voice feedback about the quality of their service. The meetings, among a series being held around the country, come as the city's VA health and benefits systems are facing separate investigations into data manipulation. At the benefits office on Wissahickon Avenue in Germantown, where Wednesday's events will be held, whistleblowers have accused administrators of encouraging employees to change dates on old claims to make them appear new. Across town at the VA Medical Center in University City, an internal audit found that appointment schedulers were encouraged to enter dates other than the ones patients had requested, one method of hiding delays.
NEWS
August 7, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Evesham's police officers have recorded 3,705 incidents while on patrol in the two weeks since they began wearing body cameras, Chief Christopher Chew said Tuesday. "I love it. It's a game changer," he said in an interview at police headquarters, where he played several clips to illustrate the new technology and his rationale for introducing it. In one, an officer just starting his shift responds to a report of a man stumbling around the lobby of town hall. The officer taps the camera, which he is wearing on his sternum, to start the audio, then steps into the lobby.
NEWS
May 27, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Don't bother using GPS to find Washington Township's town hall, the mayor of this remote Burlington County town advises, "or you'll end up in Egg Harbor Lake. " And so Dudley Lewis recites a longish list of directions - "I do this all the time," he says - that take you past farm fields and cranberry bogs, through a state forest, and down endless county roads, one of which forks without benefit of a name sign. Take the right fork, and it proves to be a long wrong turn. It won't help calling Lewis to say you're running late.
NEWS
April 26, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
BRICK, N.J. In yet another community ravaged by Hurricane Sandy, Gov. Christie on Thursday held his 120th town-hall meeting since taking office a little over four years ago, for an audience of nearly 500 people gathered in the gym of an elementary school. And the crowd was mostly friendly - composed mainly of adults over 40 and schoolchildren - who listened for more than 90 minutes to the governor discuss why he holds the forums, how much he loves New Jersey, and a story or two about his late mother.
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