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NEWS
June 28, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
BETHLEHEM - A casino built on the site of the former Bethlehem Steel plant in Pennsylvania has donated land for a town square - but the deed comes with restrictions that some find alarming. The Sands Casino Resort Bethlehem deed bans union organizing and activities with themes "offensive" to casino operators. The Morning Call of Allentown reports that the deed applies to 21/2 acres donated for the SteelStacks arts and entertainment complex. Associate Professor Seth Moglen of nearby Lehigh University calls it ironic to ban unions at a site so crucial to the steelworkers union.
NEWS
September 29, 2000 | By Michelle Jeffery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The stone war memorial in the new town square - an object that looks like a tombstone to some residents - will be settled into place permanently by next week, local officials say. The memorial had been dedicated on July 4, before the square at Greenwood Avenue and Leedom Street was finished. Earlier this month, the stone was removed from its temporary spot in the square in anticipation of the Jenkintown Jazz Festival Sept. 17. Because the monument had not been secured into the ground, Borough Manager Edwin Geissler said, it could easily have been knocked over during the festival, possibly causing injury.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
Although less than half a mile apart, the sprouting King of Prussia Town Center has no plans to compete with the mighty King of Prussia Mall, says the developer behind the new $100 million project. The Town Center - which sits where the Pennsylvania Turnpike, I-76, and Routes 422 and 202 converge - aims to be "the downtown of Upper Merion Township. " "We will be complementary," said Tom Sebastian, senior vice president of development for the JBG Companies, a large commercial real estate developer in the Mid-Atlantic region, headquartered in Chevy Chase, Md. "We are offering something that is a different experience for the consumer.
NEWS
November 3, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Christian Soltysiak hastily drew a face on the pumpkin with a marker. "He didn't want to carve it," Soltysiak said of her 4-year-old son, William. "He only wanted to drop it. " William fidgeted nearby. "Mommy, move it right now!" About 45 minutes remained before the event would begin. But already, six other pumpkins were lined up, and William was determined to watch his pumpkin take the ride of its life over Jenkintown. It would get loaded into a homemade cage in the middle of the town square, tied to the borough's fire truck ladder, and hoisted 105 feet in the air. That's 10 stories high.
NEWS
August 11, 1996 | By John K. Hunka
When William Penn sketched the first map of Philadelphia in 1682, he made one slight mistake: He generously planned five town squares for the City of Botherly Love, but he neglected to create a town square for the so-called "Liberty Lands" north of Vine Street. It's time to correct Penn's oversight by creating a sixth town square for Philadelphia. This new park, which would be established in the heart of Northern Liberties, would be called Liberty Square. America's most elegant town square is Tappan Square in Oberlin, Ohio.
NEWS
April 25, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
The middle schoolers of Jenkintown have of late, but wherefore they know not, lost all mirth, forgone all custom of exercises, and decided to hove out onto the Bard's oft-trodden stage. The Jenkintown Shakespeare Festival began four years ago when Shannon Hackett, the English and creative-writing teacher at Jenkintown Middle School, decided that her wards shouldn't just read the Elizabethan classics. Although she'd always had her classes perform scenes in front of their fellow students, she decided they'd get a better feel for the subject before a crowd - to give them a rough idea of how the product was originally meant to be sampled.
NEWS
May 27, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Glassboro's historic downtown, the story of one building chronicles the district's past - and, perhaps, its future. A colorful storefront at 11 E. High St. that now houses an artsy glass business previously held a short-lived studio and art gallery, a locally owned coffee shop, and, as far back as the mid-1900s, a neighborhood grocery store that was reportedly the first in the town to sell frozen food. Once thriving and serving the everyday needs of nearby residents, this downtown district is the subject of a revitalization campaign as borough officials try to build on the success of nearby Rowan University and create a vibrant arts community.
NEWS
November 30, 1987
Remember when one's home town was the place where the City Hall was located on the town square, surrounded by the five-and-dime store, the barber shop, the greasy spoon, the church and the nearby clapboard homes of the town fathers? Remember when a trip to the grocery always went in one direction - downtown? Remember when taking friends home for the holiday didn't mean hanging out at the mall? The town fathers in Washington Township, on the fast-expanding edge of South Jersey's suburban sprawl, are becoming intrigued by a hot new development concept - recreating, amidst the cornfields, real American downtowns.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2010 | By MICHAEL PHILLIPS, Chicago Tribune
In 1997, Sicilian-born filmmaker Marco Amenta made an hourlong documentary about Rita Atria, the young woman who risked her life by ratting out members of the Sicilian mob, including members of her own family. Now the filmmaker has revisited this heroine in a fictionalized feature film. Many of the names have been changed, and the screenwriters pump the story full of standard-grade melodrama. Not to stoke any rivalries, but the movie's no "Gomorrah," the recent Italian crime drama ripped from the headlines made by the Neapolitan mob. "The Sicilian Girl" does, however, hold your interest.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1986 | By Michael Capuzzo, Inquirer Staff Writer
One fine morning 123 summers ago, Robert E. Lee, the Confederate general, rode on horseback into Town Square leading 80,000 troops, exclaimed, "What a beautiful town!" and the next summer his cavalry torched the quiet burg. One spring morning six weeks ago, Dorothy Graeham, a mother of four from Pittsburgh, rolled into Town Square in her 1978 Ford LTD, said, "What a lovely town!" and announced that her 72,000 troops would gather in every farmer's field, on every western hill. Chambersburg, invaded thrice during the Civil War but peaceable since, is holding its breath.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 25, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
The middle schoolers of Jenkintown have of late, but wherefore they know not, lost all mirth, forgone all custom of exercises, and decided to hove out onto the Bard's oft-trodden stage. The Jenkintown Shakespeare Festival began four years ago when Shannon Hackett, the English and creative-writing teacher at Jenkintown Middle School, decided that her wards shouldn't just read the Elizabethan classics. Although she'd always had her classes perform scenes in front of their fellow students, she decided they'd get a better feel for the subject before a crowd - to give them a rough idea of how the product was originally meant to be sampled.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
Although less than half a mile apart, the sprouting King of Prussia Town Center has no plans to compete with the mighty King of Prussia Mall, says the developer behind the new $100 million project. The Town Center - which sits where the Pennsylvania Turnpike, I-76, and Routes 422 and 202 converge - aims to be "the downtown of Upper Merion Township. " "We will be complementary," said Tom Sebastian, senior vice president of development for the JBG Companies, a large commercial real estate developer in the Mid-Atlantic region, headquartered in Chevy Chase, Md. "We are offering something that is a different experience for the consumer.
TRAVEL
January 24, 2016 | By Brendan Lowe, For The Inquirer
BENTONVILLE, Ark. - At first glance, 21C appears to be another middle-of-the-road hotel and conference center in another middle-of-the-road American town. It's boxy and boring, as though the architect used Legos to make a model, then decided to stick with it. But wait. Are those life-size green plastic penguins on the roof? They are. And is that a wood-paneled car in front? As a matter of fact, it's a 1962 Fleetwood Cadillac limo with hundreds of dollars worth of pennies, nickels, and dimes glued to it. And who just walked by?
NEWS
November 3, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Christian Soltysiak hastily drew a face on the pumpkin with a marker. "He didn't want to carve it," Soltysiak said of her 4-year-old son, William. "He only wanted to drop it. " William fidgeted nearby. "Mommy, move it right now!" About 45 minutes remained before the event would begin. But already, six other pumpkins were lined up, and William was determined to watch his pumpkin take the ride of its life over Jenkintown. It would get loaded into a homemade cage in the middle of the town square, tied to the borough's fire truck ladder, and hoisted 105 feet in the air. That's 10 stories high.
NEWS
May 27, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Glassboro's historic downtown, the story of one building chronicles the district's past - and, perhaps, its future. A colorful storefront at 11 E. High St. that now houses an artsy glass business previously held a short-lived studio and art gallery, a locally owned coffee shop, and, as far back as the mid-1900s, a neighborhood grocery store that was reportedly the first in the town to sell frozen food. Once thriving and serving the everyday needs of nearby residents, this downtown district is the subject of a revitalization campaign as borough officials try to build on the success of nearby Rowan University and create a vibrant arts community.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
GETTYSBURG - One-hundred-fifty years ago last week, the Confederate Army retreated from blood-soaked fields here with their numbers depleted by catastrophic casualties. But in 2013, as visitors, spectators, and reenactors left Gettysburg following a 10-day sesquicentennial celebration, the activities in this rural town were decidedly more positive. Carl Whitehill, a spokesman for the Gettysburg Convention & Visitors Bureau, said total attendance was well over 100,000. A final tally will be unavailable for several weeks, he added.
TRAVEL
February 24, 2013 | By Manuel Valdes, Associated Press
TULUM, Mexico - The all-inclusive Cancun resorts are not known for topless women on the beach or Argentinians with scraggly beards playing Gypsy music. But that's the norm in Tulum, a Mexican seaside spot south of Cancun that attracts a mix of bohemians, deep-pocketed New Age types, and sun-seekers to its turquoise waters and white sandy beaches. Despite its proximity to Cancun and its party neighbor Playa del Carmen, Tulum is not for the same spring-break crowd. "The college kids go to Cancun.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
In April 1999, Nick L. Petroni walked to the Dumpster near the Glassboro building that housed his accounting practice and found a body inside. The grisly discovery, during a local crime wave, led Petroni and other downtown business owners to question whether they should relocate. They took their concerns to then-Mayor Alvin Shpeen and launched a years-long process of rethinking the borough. On Monday, a pleased Petroni saw Glassboro take its latest step in the revitalization of its town center, which now features Rowan University student housing, retail, and, soon, a hotel.
NEWS
January 8, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In April 1999, Nick L. Petroni walked to the Dumpster near the Glassboro building that housed his accounting practice and found a body inside. The grisly discovery, during a local crime wave, led Petroni and other downtown business owners to question whether they should relocate. They took their concerns to then-Mayor Alvin Shpeen and launched a years-long process of rethinking the borough. On Monday, a pleased Petroni saw Glassboro take its latest step in the revitalization of its town center, which now features Rowan University student housing, retail, and, soon, a hotel.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Music Man , the classic Broadway musical that opened Wednesday at the Walnut Street Theatre (and runs through Jan. 6), is a shameless, brassy, happiness machine and earns that status honestly. In contrast to less substantial portraits in provincialness such as Hairspray , The Music Man has engagingly quirky characters backed up by the sociological truths of post-Victorian heartland America. The espoused moral value of playing in marching bands arises from author Meredith Willson having played piccolo under John Philip Sousa.
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