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REAL_ESTATE
July 5, 1991 | By Marguerite P. Jones, Special to The Inquirer
FIELDSTONE AT PERKIOMEN WOODS Collegeville Montgomery County 215-489-5722 Fieldstone defies the tradition of townhouses. Instead of neat, predictable box-like structures, these homes offer unexpected angles and turns. Over the entryways are half-moon windows, on the staircases are planter shelves. Cathedral ceilings, half-turn stairways and half-wall dividers fill in other spaces. "A lot of people come in and say they don't feel like they are in a townhouse," said Penny Pavucek, sales consultant for the development in Collegeville.
NEWS
May 11, 2011 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
For nearly four hours Monday night, a debate roiled in Bucks County over the potential impact of a 175-townhouse development on the small, historic community of Lin-Park next door. Several dozen residents warned of traffic nightmares, drainage problems - indeed, the ruination of their peaceful neighborhood. But in the end, the Bensalem Township Council voted, 3-2, to allow the project. It will rise at the edge of Lin-Park, whose roots were set in the 1920s when a white farmer put aside land for blacks to build homes outside the city.
NEWS
April 30, 1986 | By Charlie Frush, Inquirer Staff Writer
Burlington Waterfront Corp. has been granted an extension to continue using four townhouses in its Quaker Landing development as offices. The extension to Dec. 4 was granted by the Burlington City zoning board at its April 21 meeting. The original variance, needed because the townhouses are within a residential district, was granted eight months ago, when the firm said it needed the space because the offices of its parent company in Willingboro, Hill International, were being rehabilitated.
NEWS
July 24, 1988 | By Laura Fortunato , Special to The Inquirer
The East Pikeland Township supervisors gave preliminary approval for construction of a housing development along Route 113 in the southeast section of the township, adjacent to the township's commercial district. At the Tuesday meeting, developer Roy Pompeii presented preliminary plans for construction of 91 townhouses and 29 houses on about 31 acres of the former Wilson tract. The property is zoned for four units per acre and includes public sewers. Pompeii planned to build 89 townhouses and 31 single-family houses on the site, but changed the plan to improve a proposed water drainage system.
NEWS
October 2, 1988 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
The fate of a controversial 39-townhouse development on the Uwchlan-West Pikeland border may rest on a question of timing. MPS Builders Inc. of West Chester has proposed the development on 12 acres in Uwchlan, between Davis Road and the Pennsylvania Turnpike. Last month, Uwchlan's supervisors decided that beginning Sept. 17, no townhouses could be built on lots of less than 20 acres. Because MPS submitted its revised plan in May, Mary Ann Rossi, the company's attorney, said the rule should not apply.
NEWS
August 21, 1988 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
The Uwchlan Board of Supervisors has proposed an ordinance that will restrict townhouse construction in the township. Under the revision to the zoning law, townhouses could only be built on lots of at least 20 acres. The current minimum is three acres. "We want to cut down the number of townhouses going in some areas," said supervisor Chairman Mary Powell at the board's Monday meeting. "It's really a sin to see developers come in here and rape the ground. " Powell said that since all the township's large tracts had been sold, developers were trying to put townhouses on smaller lots.
NEWS
July 17, 1988 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Springfield Board of Commissioners has given final approval for a 53- townhouse subdivision at Ridge Pike and Manor Road in the township's panhandle section. In a 7-0 vote on Wednesday night, the commissioners approved final plans for the subdivision, allowing developer Anthony Corrado, owner of Corrado Construction, to begin construction on the 13-acre site. The townhouses in the subdivision, to be called Eagle View, would sell for $180,000 to $225,000, according to Corrado.
NEWS
August 21, 1988 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
The Uwchlan Planning Commission has asked a developer to revise a plan for a townhouse development that would have destroyed a Lionville house built in the early 1800s. While the developer has said he will work with the township to preserve the building, he believes the task will not be easy. An expected change in the township's ordinance permitting townhouses could further hamper the development. The 22-unit project is being proposed by Vintage Development Co. of Malvern, which has an agreement of sale to buy the 3.7-acre property from Jeff McTyier.
NEWS
April 24, 1986 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
Willistown supervisors have approved the 62-townhouse Worington Commons plan, part of the Willistown Woods development on West Chester Pike. The supervisors approved the plans Tuesday night, but they said building permits would not be issued until the state Department of Environmental Resources approved tying in the additional units to the existing sewage treatment plant. The approval came after a lengthy discussion over a dispute between Stewart Lundy, the developer's attorney, and Howard Marcu, attorney for the owner of 10 acres surrounded by the Willistown Woods development.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | By Steve Edgcumbe, Special to The Inquirer
The Terramics Property Co. of Berwyn has asked the Willistown Board of Supervisors for permission to build 211 townhouses. At a supervisors' meeting Monday, Peter O. Hausmann, a partner with Terramics, said the plan called for the Quaker Farm townhouses to be built on an 83-acre tract on the south side of West Chester Pike between Delchester Road and Street Road (Route 926). The owner of the property is Quaker Farms Inc., which is owned by Terramics, Hausmann said. The proposal meets all township zoning requirements, including a requirement to preserve open space in the township, Hausmann told the supervisors.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 8, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. "You know. Something like Manayunk. " In the last two years, there hasn't been a conversation reported in this space about a reemerging suburban borough or a hopeful city neighborhood that did not include at least one reference to the "Manayunk experience. " That's Manayunk, translated from present-day Philadelphian as trendy and hip , as opposed to Manayunk, from a Lenni Lenape word meaning river (in this case, the Schuylkill)
NEWS
December 3, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tiny pink flags appeared recently in the ground to mark the spot where the first townhouses will be built in a bulldozed neighborhood in Mount Holly that was declared blighted more than a decade ago. Some Mount Holly Gardens residents had sued, saying the town's plan to redevelop the area was discriminatory because their rowhouses were being demolished and replaced with market-rate units they could not afford. Their case went through state and federal courts, and was settled one year ago. Under the 111-page settlement, seven homeowners agreed to move and take a buyout, while 20 others were promised new townhouses, referred to as "replacement homes," in the Gardens.
NEWS
October 31, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Promenade greenways, nature trails, and water views for a townhouse development will sprout next year at a location along a commercial corridor that local leaders hope will mark a rebirth for Clementon. The developer joined elected officials and other dignitaries Wednesday behind shovels in the old Acme shopping center on the White Horse Pike, where they broke ground for the first phase - 49 upscale townhouses in Leewood Villages at Rowand Pond. Clementon, a two-square-mile borough in Camden County, has about 5,000 residents.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Construction of townhouses at the site of the long-vacant Mount Sinai Hospital in South Philadelphia could begin in the next few weeks, now that the city Zoning Board of Adjustment has given its approval for this first phase of a larger project proposed by Greenpointe Construction. Building permits are pending for the 37 three-story townhouses. Still awaiting approval is a plan to convert the hospital's main building into up to 198 apartments. Greenpointe, a Philadelphia firm run by Gagandeep Lakhmna, seeks historic tax credits to renovate the main building, said Koenig.
NEWS
March 6, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Jonathan Lai, and Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writers
EWING, N.J. - Family photos crashed to wood floors. Windows shattered. Insulation was hurled through the air and draped barren trees in sheets of pink. A gas explosion Tuesday afternoon transformed a townhouse complex into a dark landscape of destruction, killing one person and injuring at least seven utility workers. "I thought it was the end of the world," said Robert Conrad, 74, who lives about six units away from the home where the explosion apparently was centered. He rushed out with a coat and camera, leaving behind his wallet and two cats.
NEWS
November 25, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
A group of middle-aged and elderly homeowners gleefully passed around a picture of a three-story brick-front townhouse, admiring its modern appearance and the inclusion of a garage. A gloom that hung over them for a decade - after Mount Holly Township decided to bulldoze their postwar-era rowhouses and redevelop their impoverished neighborhood - had finally lifted. "I'm excited. I just can't wait until this finally goes through and I get my house," said Beatriz Cruz, referring to a redevelopment project that until now would have forced her and her mostly Latino and African American neighbors out. They had refused to move even after the town threatened eminent domain and ripped apart their houses and sidewalks as others relocated.
REAL_ESTATE
November 17, 2013 | By Alison Burdo, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the construction of 22 luxury townhouses, a local real estate development firm is pushing the boundaries of posh living beyond the traditional tony neighborhoods of Center City. Philadelphia-based Clarke Real Estate Development L.L.C. will unveil Sunday the first phase of its Parke Place townhouses on the 1300 block of Bainbridge Street. The first eight homes are to be completed by year's end. The 4,300-square-foot townhouses offer a distinct take on the open floor plan that buyers want lately.
REAL_ESTATE
July 22, 2013 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Kevin and Khesha Kelly's townhouse in Doylestown's Lantern Hill community has become an anchor for their busy lives. "I feel as if I am coming home to a Norman Rockwell painting after traveling through some of the roughest cities in the Northeast," Kevin says. "I love coming back to my quiet little town. " Kevin Kelly, a salesman for a food company, travels on the job throughout the United States and Canada. Khesha Kelly, a food scientist, has just started a second career as a paralegal in central New Jersey.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A developer seeking a 20-year Payment in Lieu of Taxes agreement for 175 low-income properties it plans to rehabilitate in Camden's Lanning Square and Bergen Square neighborhoods cleared the first hurdle Tuesday. Camden City Council approved an ordinance on first reading to grant Broadway Townhouses, owned by Roizman Development of Plymouth Meeting, a so-called PILOT agreement, which the company said would put at least $175,000 a year in city coffers. The company pays city taxes estimated at a little less than half that amount.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
BARRY Le LAND knows a man who talks of kicking a skull around when he was a boy after the Queen Lane Apartments high-rise was built in 1955. "A couple of fellows said they were playing kickball and thought they were kicking a rock, but then they saw it was a skull," Le Land said. "I have seen bones over there. But we didn't know it was a potter's field. " Residents said the bones started to appear after the Philadelphia Housing Authority finished building the high-rise in 1955, at Queen Lane and Pulaski Avenue, the site of an all-but-forgotten burial ground for African-Americans.
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