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Toxics

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NEWS
October 1, 1992 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Bridesburg has reclaimed its unofficial title as the toxics capital of Pennsylvania industry. After slipping a notch out of first place for a year, the Lower Northeast neighborhood again leads the state in the latest tally of toxics churned out by manufacturing plants. Bridesburg (19137) also led all Pennsylvania zip codes in brewing up chemicals believed to cause cancer or birth defects, according to information released yesterday by Citizen Action, a consumer advocacy group.
NEWS
May 10, 1992 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The state has given permission for sewage sludge to be disposed at the landfill in Chatham operated by the Southeastern Chester County Refuse Authority. The permit was requested by the Chester authority's management without the knowledge of its directors, who will consider the plan Wednesday night. At least two of the 10 directors raised concerns, asking whether sludge contained materials exceeding federal safety limits. "I want to be sure that we are not taking toxic material into the landfill or setting the stage for taking toxics in," said director William R. McClellan of Kennett Square.
NEWS
August 2, 1996 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The Northeast Philly company that releases the most toxics into the city's air is also among the state's biggest producers of chemicals linked to human reproductive disorders, an advocacy group said yesterday. Kurt-Hastings Inc., a graphics- arts company in an industrial park near Northeast Philadelphia Airport, produced more than 776 tons of chemicals believed to affect the reproductive system, according to a report released by the Pennsylvania Public Interest Research Group. Of that amount, about 410 tons of toluene and 21.9 tons of xylene were released directly into the air. The rest went to waste companies and treatment systems in other states.
NEWS
July 23, 1991 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Are we the toxics capital, or what? Philadelphia and adjacent Bucks County grow a larger crop of toxic pollutants than any other part of the state, according to a new report released today. The Bridesburg ZIP code area (19137) - which led the state in an earlier report on toxic wastes and emissions - slipped to second place this round behind the Bucks County neighborhood (19030) that hosts the USX steel plant near Fairless Hills. But two Bridesburg industries still ranked among the state's top three toxics producers, in the new compilation of 1989 toxics data by the consumer group Citizen Action of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
April 13, 1989 | By Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
Pennsylvania industries are spewing close to 394 million pounds of toxic chemicals into the environment each year, the Environmental Protection Agency said yesterday, as it detailed a "startling" total of 22 billion pounds of toxic substances poured annually into the nation's water, air and land. The agency acknowledged in Washington, where it released the first nationwide inventory on toxics, that its tactics to curb pollution have failed to keep pace with the release of the chemicals.
NEWS
February 10, 1995 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Fish swimming up the Delaware don't turn back any more when they reach Philadelphia. Harsh chemicals in the water no longer burn the paint off freighters' hulls. But a report scheduled for release today warns that despite decades of improvement in the water quality of the river, the job is far from done. The tri-state Delaware Estuary Program will urge tighter controls on toxic releases by industries, and preservation of land and wildlife as part of a long-range plan to protect the Delaware River and Bay. Toxics are worse in the river's sediments than previously believed, according to an earlier study by the group.
NEWS
April 15, 1999 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Polluters are us. The latest evidence is the Environmental Protection Agency's first attempt to estimate the toxics that lurk in the air in Philadelphia and communities across the nation - with a big chunk of the pollution tracked straight to drivers and consumers. "We know we're putting stuff out there that has an impact on public health," said Clean Air Council director Joseph Minott. "The question becomes, do we really want to know how dangerous it is, or do we want to drive our ever-larger SUVs?"
NEWS
August 11, 1998 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Flo Gordon says she doesn't keep the fish. "We always say, anything out of this river, we're not too sure about," says the Port Richmond resident, who often spends mornings fishing in the Delaware. If someone wanted her catch, she'd give it to him, though. And many Philly anglers do stretch the budget by serving fish from the Delaware or the Schuylkill. Those urban fishermen are a major reason officials care if there are toxics in the rivers. Recently, the agencies that monitor the river found something that surprised them.
NEWS
April 22, 1999 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
It's Earth Day. And if you're looking for environmentalists, you'll probably find them (a) hugging trees, (b) hollering about pollution, (c) hunched over their computer terminals. Any answer is correct. This year - in more proof of the rise of the Internet - new environmental Web sites have joined park cleanups as a major feature of Earth Day. This week, the Environmental Defense Fund unveiled a search engine that allows anyone with a computer to check out local cancer risks from airborne toxics.
NEWS
July 16, 1996 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
After five days of testing in a mobile lab, state environmental scientists say they have found no serious health hazards to residents of two South Philadelphia neighborhoods near an oil-contaminated military supply base. "People should be able to rest assured that they're not being exposed to the contaminants in a serious way in the residential areas," Department of Environmental Protection spokesman Rob Goldberg said yesterday. Soil and sewer tests were conducted in the Passyunk Homes housing project and in Packer Park.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 14, 2015 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
NICOLE JONIEC'S biggest regret, five years after moving into a century-old rowhouse in South Philadelphia with her husband and their two cats, is that she didn't zoom out a little more when she had checked out her new address on Google Maps. Joniec, 37, who works at the Free Library, said she now feels "silly" that she didn't realize how close they would live to the ancient, sprawling refinery on the banks of the Schuylkill, then owned by Sunoco and which today - with a new owner, Philadelphia Energy Solutions - is booming with crude oil fracked in North Dakota.
NEWS
April 5, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
It was a vacation nightmare. A Wilmington family of four staying in a Virgin Islands condo, with idyllic views of Cruz Bay on St. John, suddenly became seriously ill. So ill that they were airlifted home and hospitalized, the father and two teenage boys in critical condition. The likely scenario that has emerged is that they were poisoned after methyl bromide was sprayed in the condo underneath the one where the family was staying. The pesticide is banned in many countries and is not authorized for use in residences in the U.S. The incident, while deemed uncommon, has heightened concerns about travelers' exposure to pesticides in other regions or countries that may not have usage restrictions or regulatory oversight as stringent as that in the U.S. "Can this go on as you travel around the world?
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
It happened so fast. Angela Farrell was doing the family laundry, using small packets of detergent - an innovation introduced in early 2012. The Levittown mother, 24, always handled them carefully, but on that day in March, she didn't notice she had dropped one. Her 18-month-old son, Landon, did. He grabbed the packet and stuffed it in his mouth. Turning, she saw what was happening, but before she could even reach for it, he had swallowed the packet. Call 911. Ambulance.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, the residents of the tiny, unassuming borough of Newfield in southeast Gloucester County have wondered what would happen to the piles of radioactive waste sitting at a former metal manufacturing facility. Hopes of a cleanup plan being approved, let alone executed, dimmed as authority over the material remained in limbo. Twice, a federal agency's decision to cede its oversight of the waste to New Jersey was halted after complaints by the metals company. But on its third attempt, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's effort to shift its authority to the state Department of Environmental Protection withstood Shieldalloy Metallurgical Corp.'s challenge in court.
NEWS
June 3, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A state study conducted in the aftermath of the 2012 train derailment in Paulsboro found that more than half of those interviewed reported new or intensified health issues in the days after the accident. Most commonly, residents noted experiencing headaches, respiratory symptoms, and coughing in the week after the Nov. 30 accident, according to the Department of Health report, based on two surveys. In its findings, 58 percent of those interviewed in person and 66 percent of those responding to a mail-in survey said they experienced "new or worsening symptoms" in the week after the derailment, which leaked about 20,000 gallons of toxic vinyl chloride into the atmosphere.
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
PAULSBORO A federal agency has agreed to investigate the presence of a little-examined but toxic contaminant in Paulsboro and nearby towns, just as the state appears poised to take on the issue. The U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry indicated it would investigate the presence of perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), a type of perfluorinated compound (PFC), in the South Jersey area, the Delaware Riverkeeper Network announced Tuesday. The group filed a petition in August asking for the examination.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
SOMEBODY'S got an issue with Britney Spears . First came a story that Spears was planning to lip-sync her entire Las Vegas show, quickly denied by Team Britney, which stressed all the voice training she was doing. Now comes a story on RadarOnline.com that Brit's ticket sales are tanking, with only three of the first 16 dates selling out so far. An anonymous insider told Radar Online: "After spending hundreds of thousands on promo, they expected to instantly sell out all of the first 16 shows, but they didn't come close!"
NEWS
June 23, 2013 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Do you remember when you wanted mail? I don't. If you do, you must be younger than I am, or have a better memory, which is basically the same thing. Bottom line, I'm not sure when this happened, but there came a time when mail started to suck. Correction. I know exactly when this happened. When I grew up and started paying my own bills. We can all agree that bills are no fun, but that's not even the problem I have with my mail. Because at least bills are important.
NEWS
May 29, 2013
THERE IS a toxic attitude in Philadelphia toward Gov. Corbett. The fact is that the dysfunctional Philadelphia public schools want $120 million more from the Corbett administration, and state taxpayers have given rise to an outrageous charge against Corbett that he disputed recently on the monthly show that I do with him from Harrisburg. Have you heard the one that Corbett has cut public-education funding drastically and yet has dramatically plowed state funds into building more prisons?
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