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Toy Story

NEWS
December 1, 2002 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A snoozing Goofy straddling the base of a telephone wakes up and announces an incoming call. "This is one of my favorites," said Tony Rogers, president of RJ Studios, which designs prototypes of toys, electronics and medical devices. "That's what we are really good at - combining sculpture, mechanism and animation in small spaces. " Working from a sketch, or sometimes just a vision, the company uses the latest in technology to create prototypes ready for manufacture. The nucleus of the operation is a large, airy room divided by open cubicles filled with toy motorcycles and cars, colorful figurines, molds, cables and wires.
NEWS
December 9, 2003
What if big isn't always best? The FAO Schwarz flagship store in Manhattan is a New York City icon, as much a part of the holiday season as gawking at the Rockefeller Center tree. Visiting that toy wonderland has been the stuff of childhood dreams, no matter where the dreamer's pillow might lie. Soon, though, it may be the stuff of bankrupt memories. Last week, parent company FAO Inc., of King of Prussia, filed for bankruptcy protection for the second time this year. FAO Schwarz stores might close.
NEWS
December 14, 2008 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Naquan Burns emerged from Santa's toyland with wide eyes and a shiny red fire truck. Christmas had come early, and the 5-year-old bubbled over with joy. "I got just what I wanted!" said Naquan, a kindergartner at Wright Elementary School. "Santa was really nice!" That's just what Santa - and more than 100 volunteers - had in mind for Naquan and the 400 other children from city schools and homeless shelters who gathered for Rubye's Kids Holiday Party at Girard College yesterday.
NEWS
February 24, 1997 | by Robert Strauss For the Daily News
Add 101 Dalmatians to 17,000 different products and multiply by every pre-teen in the multiplexed world. How much doggone money can you make? It's the Licensing Game and it is the biggest thing in the toy business these days. The rules are simple: Pick a movie, TV show or some other cultural icon, make toys in their image and - voila! - the bottom line turns magically black. No messy assembly time - or creative research and development - necessary. The Toy Manufacturers of America estimate that half of the 2.99 billion toys sold in the United States in 1996, accounting for more than $7 billion in sales, were licensed products.
NEWS
June 29, 1997 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In these lean economic times for municipalities, there's still one thing that's free: Entertainment. Several Burlington County towns are offering easy times this summer, despite cutbacks in other parts of municipal budgets. "Municipalities have had to cut back on so many services, but not on summer entertainment," said Suzanne Veitengruber, Tabernacle's township administrator. "Municipally sponsored movies and concerts are big summertime traditions in Burlington County. " To help pay for movie and concert series, many municipalities are following the lead of Tabernacle and Burlington City and asking civic groups or businesses to help them defray the costs.
NEWS
June 21, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andy may have outgrown his toys, but movie audiences haven't. Toy Story 3 , the latest entry in Pixar's pioneering cinema series about toys that come to life, took the top spot in the box-office derby on its debut weekend with a gate of $109 million. It was the best debut ever for a Disney Pixar Animation picture, soaring past the $70.5 million that The Incredibles earned its first weekend. All 11 of Pixar's films have opened at No. 1. Toy Story 3 also continued Hollywood's streak of 3-D hits.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2010
WE KNOW from 1 Corinthians that while as children we speak and think as children, there is a time to put away childish things. And we know from Pixar that the time to put these things away is, like, never. The "Toy Story" franchise is built around the idea that in our modern culture, we find it very difficult to surrender the part of ourselves that spent languid afternoons with G.I. Joe or Barbie. (Or G.I. Joe and Barbie. You know who you are.) Actually, it's not just an idea.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
The news is bad. Bad for the weary, end-of-day Chestnut Hill West commuters who get off the train at Evergreen Avenue and stop by this fanciful place - not necessarily to buy something, but to be someplace fun. Bad for the legions of frazzled parents of birthday-party invitees who have counted on it for a last-minute present and free gift wrap on a Saturday morning. And bad for the guy who drove the hour-and-a-half to it from Jim Thorpe just to buy six pimple balls. O'Doodles toy store, a fixture on Germantown Avenue in Chestnut Hill since 1997, is the bearer of the bad news: It is closing.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2010 | By Justin Hoeger, McClatchy Newspapers
Toy Story 3 . Publisher: Disney Interactive System: Sony PlayStation 3, also for Microsoft Xbox 360, Nintendo Wii, Nintendo DS, Sony PlayStation Portable Price: $49.99 ($29.99 to $49.99 for other versions) Age rating: 10 and older Toy Story 3 does a smart thing: It rolls two games into one. First, it has the expected adventure roughly following the events of this summer's Pixar movie, with Sheriff Woody, Jessie the cowgirl, and Buzz Lightyear the space ranger heading out on a number of levels, starting with their owner's home and moving on to Sunnyside Daycare and points beyond.
NEWS
May 1, 1996 | By Jennifer Inez Ward, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jim Wiley has been going through his second childhood for 25 years. That is how long ago Wiley, a retired high school math teacher, started the mechanical toy collection that has made his one-story ranch house one of the borough's more unusual sights. Wiley's living room, like the rest of his house, is a jumble of books and toys. With classical music playing in the background, Wiley explained, in a teacher's lecture tone, how he got "hooked" on collecting. "I used to collect coins, but that wasn't very exciting," said Wiley, 66. Then a fellow teacher at Neshaminy High School gave him a small copper elephant and a few other trinkets.
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