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NEWS
April 20, 2011 | Associated Press
DETROIT - Toyota Motor Corp. has extended production cuts at its North American factories into early June as it struggles to deal with parts shortages caused by the earthquake that hit Japan. The disruptions caused by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami continue to spread. Toyota has warned dealers to expect shortages well into this summer, and has changed paint colors on many models because of chemical shortages from a supplier. Even U.S. automakers are feeling the pain, trimming production schedules at many plants.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2011 | Associated Press
TOKYO - Toyota Motor Corp. said Friday that it would maintain output at half capacity in Japan from May 10 through June 3 because of a supply crunch for auto parts after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami disaster. The world's No. 1 automaker said it remained unclear when it would return to full production in Japan. Toyota spokeswoman Shiori Hashimoto said the company was struggling to obtain about 150 types of auto parts. The magnitude-9.0 earthquake and ensuing tsunami destroyed parts factories in northeastern Japan, causing severe supply shortages for Toyota and other automakers.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2011 | By Bruce Schreiner, Associated Press
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - Toyota Motor Corp. said Monday it almost surely would be forced to temporarily shut down all of its North American factories because of parts shortages due to the earthquake that hit Japan last month. The temporary shutdowns are likely to take place in April and affect 25,000 workers, but no layoffs are expected, company spokesman Mike Goss said. How long the shutdowns last or whether all 13 of Toyota's North American factories will be affected at the same time is unknown and depends on when parts production can restart in Japan, he said.
NEWS
February 9, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal officials delivered reassuring news Tuesday to Toyota and its customers: A 10-month study by engineers at NASA found no evidence that electronic or software failures contributed to thousands of complaints that Toyota vehicles could suddenly speed out of control. At a news conference in Washington, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said NASA supported the stance of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, which pressed Toyota to recall nearly eight million vehicles in 2009 and 2010 because of gas pedals that could stick or get trapped by loose floor mats.
BUSINESS
February 8, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Another piece of the puzzle behind complaints about sudden unintended acceleration in Toyotas may fall into place Tuesday when Department of Transportation officials disclose findings from a 10-month study by engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. At the request of Congress, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration enlisted NASA in its effort to identify any hidden flaws in Toyota's components, electronics, or software that could cause rare but dangerous failures.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Last January, Toyota was wrapping up what must qualify as its worst month ever. The Japanese automaker had just added "sticky gas pedals" to "loose floor mats" as its explanation for hundreds of complaints that vehicles were accelerating when drivers weren't stepping on the gas - a problem first brought to light by a fiery fatal crash in California a few months earlier. Toyota Motor Corp. recalled 2.3 million vehicles to solve the pedal problem, on top of 5.4 million recalled because of the floor-mat issue.
NEWS
June 6, 2010 | By Darran Simon and Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writers
Libia Martinez approached the church secretary at Our Lady of Fatima in North Bergen, N.J., shortly before the Spanish-language Mass last Sunday and handed her a note. "My husband disappeared," Martinez explained. On the paper, the deeply devout woman beseeched her fellow parishioners at the Roman Catholic church to pray for her spouse, Martin Caballero, missing since May 21 from the parking lot of the Trump Taj Mahal Casino Resort in Atlantic City. Miles away, in Atlantic County, police believed they already had located Caballero.
NEWS
May 29, 2010 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo and Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A career criminal recently released from prison and his young accomplice were arrested in Atlantic County on Friday morning and charged in connection with the May 21 disappearance of a North Jersey tourist from a garage at the Trump Taj Mahal casino. Craig Brian Arno, 44, of Atlantic City, and Jessica Kisby, 24, of Egg Harbor Township, face first-degree counts of kidnapping and carjacking. Each was jailed with cash bail set at $400,000, Atlantic County Prosecutor Ted Housel said.
NEWS
May 29, 2010 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo and Sam Wood, Inquirer Staff Writers
MAYS LANDING, N.J. - A career criminal recently released from prison and his young accomplice were arrested in Atlantic County on Friday morning and charged in connection with the May 21 disappearance of a North Jersey tourist from a garage at the Trump Taj Mahal casino. Craig Brian Arno, 44, of Atlantic City, and Jessica Kisby, 24, of Egg Harbor Township, face first-degree counts of kidnapping and carjacking. Each was jailed with cash bail set at $400,000, Atlantic County Prosecutor Ted Housel said.
NEWS
May 10, 2010 | By Michael Fumento
"The whole aim of practical politics," wrote H.L. Mencken, "is to keep the populace alarmed (and hence clamorous to be led to safety) by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary. " Last year's hobgoblin was swine flu. The President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology warned of as many as 90,000 excess flu deaths, and the federal government declared two national emergencies. Yet, with the U.S. flu season ending, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate we've had perhaps a third the usual number of flu deaths.
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