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NEWS
December 19, 2008
FOR CHILDREN, the sight of toys under their Christmas tree is one of the earliest memories of fundamental joy. The sight is a once-a-year magical promise that they will always be given what they want, and will never know deprivation. And that's why there's probably nothing sadder than the trees barren of toys. Every year, too many children experience that deprivation. This year is no exception. In fact, this year, more children than ever may be deprived of Christmas' promise.
NEWS
December 17, 1998 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
"I know it's a puzzle, but what does it do?" "You want me to read a book? That's no fun. " "Do we have to go to Aunt Aggie's Christmas Day? They don't have Play Station over there. " The responses above confirm what any parent on his way to camp out in hopes of scoring a Furby already knows: We've fallen down in this age of technology, and we can't get up. Or rather, we can't get back to a time when kids actually played with toys, rather than watched toys play for them.
NEWS
November 8, 1999 | DAVID MAIALETTI/ DAILY NEWS
Carrying good intentions motorcyclists set out from Columbus Boulevard yesterday as part of the Toys for Tots Bike Run. Thousands of bikers participated in the annual trek, transporting toys to kids at Children's hospital of Philadelphia in West Phila.
NEWS
July 19, 2010
This week's Adopt-a-Pet at the Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society is Alice, a 3-year-old American Staffordshire terrier mix. Alice is friendly and gets along with dogs and cats. She enjoys small playgroups and chew toys. To adopt Alice, contact PAWS, 100 N. 2nd St., at 215-238-9901. When inquiring, please provide her tag identifier, which is "Clinic. " A $75 fee includes sterilization, vaccines and microchipping.
NEWS
September 29, 1987 | By GINA BOUBION, Daily News Staff Writer
They didn't know little Cecilia Cichan, but after yesterday, they consider her a friend. Today, they'll play with the toys she gave them. Stuffed bears, dogs, tigers and mice, Barbie dolls, Cabbage Patch Kids and baby dolls flooded the playroom at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children in North Philadelphia. The toys were only a fraction of gifts from Cecilia, the lone survivor of a plane crash on Aug. 16 in Detroit that killed 156 people, including her immediate family.
NEWS
November 25, 1989 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
With Christmas one month away, auction companies next week will conduct four sales specializing in two holiday-gift categories: toys and jewelry. The first toy sale will be at 5:30 p.m. Monday at West Hanover Township Fire Hall three miles east of the Harrisburg suburb of Linglestown. There Tom and John Golden will offer a variety of dolls and stuffed animals, including a 1962 "bubble-cut" Barbie and a 1906 F.A.O. Schwarz bear. The bear from the New York toy store is one of a quantity of ursine items to be offered.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1986 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
It's often said that toys are designed to appeal as much to adult buyers as to the child-recipients of the playthings. When it comes to techno toys, that grownup appeal goes double. At the recent American Toy Fair in New York, this grownup gadgeteer was regularly inspired to take out the charge card and buy-buy-buy, entranced by the latest in sound and vision, mechanical and computerized toys. However, the Toy Fair is "wholesale only," and many of the products introduced there by manufacturers won't actually be available until spring or summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1987 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
Those cartoon shows that are no more than animated versions of kids' toys are "robbing children of better programming" and making them more aggressive, according to a Harvard developmental psychologist. Ronald G. Slaby, of Harvard's Center for Research on Children's Television, said in the June 13 issue of TV Guide that he feels there is a "unique interaction between television violence and a set of toys that are marketed and readily available to the children for possible aggressive play and outright agressive behaviour.
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | By NICHOLAS H. MORGAN
Don't give your children toys. Give them things they can play with. The force of this home truth struck me between the eyes after the holidays, as those lovely, expensive toys we had lavished upon our 6- and 9-year-old "mystery beings" were discarded in favor of - things. What sort of things? Watch your children at play. What do they do? Ours play-act. That is, they recreate the events of the day, the week, the month and most often the hour, on their own terms. We went to a Broadway play, a big splurge, Cats.
NEWS
June 24, 1989 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Now may not be the time to worry about Christmas shopping for the kids. But if you think the price of stuffing a stocking in December is outrageous, consider the prospects of a sale next Saturday in the Baltimore suburb of Timonium, Md. Starting at 10 a.m., Richard Opfer will conduct a toy auction at which a 40-year-old tin representation of Popeye the Sailor in an airplane is expected to sell for $5,000 to $7,000. The sale is one of four over the next eight days that also will offer bidders new plants and old books.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Columnist
AT THE RECENT American International Toy Fair in New York, Gizmo Guy found playthings so profoundly juiced with tech magic he longed to be a kid again. MAKE-IT-YOURSELF TOYS: The concept has gotten a major rethink. Industry leader Hasbro announced the first kid-oriented (and reasonably priced, we hope) 3-D printer, a programmable device that spits plastic goop in precise layers to build a play-ready object. Expect it by Christmas. Hasbro's venture partner is printer maker 3D Systems, which just bought a toy modeling company with rights to "Star Wars," "Harry Potter" and "Hobbit" collectibles.
NEWS
January 25, 2014 | By Julie Xie, Inquirer Staff Writer
Logan Milleman bounced down a hallway of Wills Eye Hospital on Wednesday, showing off his new ID badge: Master Logan, Commander in Chief. He was in good spirits. His right eye has been cancer-free for almost five years. The 6-year-old's parents, Robert and Jeri Milleman, trailed behind him with three large Kohl's bags filled with stuffed-animal toys they had brought for the children in the hospital. He has come a long way. In 2009, Logan's right eye was diagnosed with retinoblastoma, a rare pediatric cancer that is blinding and life-threatening.
NEWS
December 15, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dexter, a purebred Australian cattle dog, gnawed on a stuffed animal until he found the sweet spot that made the toy squeak. "They love that squeaker," Marianne Ahern said this month as Dexter and two other four-legged creatures played with the squeaky item at her half-acre house near Langhorne, Bucks County. The toy was originally a Beanie Baby that would have ended up in a landfill, but Ahern reclaimed it, cleaned it, and converted it into a Glad Dogs Nation product. "I see this as my retirement business," said Ahern, 57, president and founder of Glad Dogs Nation.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
ON SATURDAY, family and friends of Aimee Willard, a 22-year-old college lacrosse star who was slain in 1996, are holding a collection drive to benefit a community center in the North Philadelphia neighborhood where her body was found. From 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., donations of unwrapped toys and coats for children ages 5 to 15 will be collected outside Riddle Ale House at 1073 W. Baltimore Pike in Media. Monetary donations will also be accepted. All donations will go to the Hero Community Center at 3439 N. 17th St.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2013 | By Jane Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The United States' trade deficit with China topped $30 billion last week. In Hatfield, Michael Araten, 43, chief executive of K'nex Brands L.P., the toy company, is making that trend go the other way. President Obama visited K'nex in November to highlight the company's decision to bring back most of its manufacturing from China. In August, K'nex began exporting its toys to China. Question: What struck you about your visit with the president? Answer: He was personally incredibly charming.
NEWS
July 17, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack Robbins, 84, a manufacturer's representative for toy companies, died Sunday, July 14, of lung cancer at the home of his former wife in Villanova. Mr. Robbins worked with toy retailers and wholesalers from Maine to Virginia, as well as the Kiddie City stores in the Philadelphia area. Later, he sold toys to Kmart and Toys R Us, and at the time of his death was a sales rep for Wiffle Ball. "They refused to accept his resignation," his daughter Deborah said. Mr. Robbins and his twin, Saul, were born at home on Yewdall Street in West Philadelphia, the fifth and sixth children of Joseph Robbins, a house painter.
NEWS
June 3, 2013 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Benson loves to play with toy cars and proudly shows off his racing track, which he builds into different shapes. The 9-year-old has many other interests, including playing basketball, soccer, and dodgeball. When he is indoors, he spends many happy hours playing video games and watching television. Outdoors, he delights in running around and riding his bike and scooter. Although he is shy when meeting new people, he soon warms up. Benson does very well in school, where he receives special-education services.
NEWS
May 10, 2013
DEAR ABBY: We have a grandson who is 4 and very much a "princess boy. " He likes girl toys and dresses and doesn't like any of his boy toys. He's an adorable little boy and we love him to pieces. His parents don't accept this behavior, and I'm afraid it will affect him now and in the future. How would you handle this? We don't say anything to his parents because they are pretty much in denial. - Worried Grandma DEAR WORRIED: If he were my grandchild I'd talk with the parents.
NEWS
April 11, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
People hustling through 30th Street Station Thursday morning should be greeted by something completely unexpected - a 16-foot-high fiberglass and metal sculpture of a cartoony seated figure with its hands over its face. There will be something vaguely familiar about the figure. Could it be the three-fingered hands? The white gloves? The knobby earlike fringe around the head? The bare pate? All of the above speak to the world of cartoons in general and Disney characters in particular.
NEWS
April 1, 2013 | BY DERRIK J. LANG, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - After a nine-month delay, "G.I. Joe: Retaliation" deployed to the top spot at the box office. The action film starring Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson, Bruce Willis and Channing Tatum as the gun-toting military toys brought to life marched into the No. 1 position at the weekend box office, earning $41.2 million, according to studio estimates Sunday. "Retaliation" opened Wednesday at midnight, which helped bring its domestic total to $51.7 million. Paramount postponed the sequel to 2009's "G.I.
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