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Toys

NEWS
August 16, 1987 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
Fuzzy little stuffed animals, 16 of them. Donald Allen brought them to a meeting of the Darby Borough Council's public safety committee Wednesday night to complain. "Child exploitation. An inducement to teach our youngsters to gamble," he charged as he plunked a shopping bag full of the toys before surprised council members and Mayor Louis Saraullo. Allen, a print shop operator, told the committee that the amusement machines dispensing these stuffed animals were the real culprits.
NEWS
May 14, 1992 | by Nancy Carlsson-Paige and Diane E. Levin, Special to the Daily News
On a recent visit to an urban first-grade classroom, we found all the boys starting their day huddled together discussing the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Excitedly they talked about the ways they would hurt "Shredder" (the enemy of the Turtles). "I'd smash him. " "I'd kick him in the face. " "I'll cut him in two. " They discussed the Turtle movies, the Turtle video and the new Turtle Nintendo game, with which they all seemed familiar. A few minutes later, as the daily activities began, they settled down to drawing Ninja Turtles and writing about them in their journals.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1988 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
It happens every day at a small store in Center City: Time travel, an instant alchemy in which children of the '60s step through the door and into their childhoods. All their lost toys are here. Beatles dolls, Bonanza lunchboxes and James Bond attache cases line the walls, while a small army of rare GI Joes guards a Howdy Doody marionette on a back shelf. Other shelves are crammed with Dick Tracy models, Batman bookends and Star Trek figures. It's all at Neat Stuff, where discerning fans of the Beatles and other '60s icons can still find items that vanished into attics and garages two decades ago. Most of the toys are in excellent condition, and most will go to savvy collectors willing to pay the prices.
NEWS
November 24, 1991 | Inquirer photographs by Akira Suwa
The economy may be down for the count, but the countdown is on: only five weeks till Christmas. While grownups are fretting about the recession, children are blissfully unconcerned. They're busy making lists of what toys they want. And judging from the scene at local stores, they'll have them.
NEWS
December 18, 1992 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Appropriately for a movie about a toy plant converted to a munitions factory, "Toys" is a bomb. Though its creators have drawn self-important comparisons to classic military satires like "Dr. Strangelove," this movie is a woeful failure - noisy, flabby, dissonant, clumsy and juvenile. "Toys" also is an extravagant waste of money, an '80s-style exercise in self-indulgence (two hours!) that makes "Batman Returns" look responsible by comparison. "Toys" director Barry Levinson spent $40 million to create what he hoped would be an adult-oriented (this is not for children)
NEWS
January 24, 1988 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Thousands of toys dating from the 1870s to the early 1940s will be on display next weekend and Feb. 6 and 7 from 1 to 4 p.m. each day at the Whitman Stafford Farm House, 315 Maple Ave., Laurel Springs. The tours are free. The toys are from the private collection of Al Copsetta, a member of the Whitman Stafford Committee, which oversees the maintenance and operation of the 18th-century farmhouse that was once the summer home of poet Walt Whitman. The committee hopes that the exhibition will draw attention to the restored house, Copsetta said.
NEWS
March 13, 2001 | INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Burger King Corp. and Alcone Marketing Group are recalling 400,000 "Rattling, Paddling Riverboat" Kids Meal toys distributed nationwide in January and February, Burger King said yesterday. The red plastic boats, 2 to 3 inches in diameter, contain a metal pin with a plastic cap that attaches the paddle wheel to the boat, the No. 2 hamburger chain said in a statement. The pin may come out and pose a choking hazard to small children. Alcone Marketing Group, based in Irvine, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2002 | By STEVE GARY For the Daily News
With only about 53 shopping days left until Christmas, the quest to buy toys to put under the tree and in stockings is well under way. Auctioneer Barry S. Slosberg provides a great opportunity tomorrow and Sunday to acquire toys for kids of all ages as he conducts a gallery sale featuring 400 lots daily of antique and collectible toys, many in their original boxes. Tomorrow's sale will include items from the 1930s to the present, featuring Disney characters on Ohio Art sand pails and watering cans, nodders and rare European items; Fisher Price toys from the 1940s; H.O. scale and standard gauge Lionel trains; Kenner Star Wars large-size action figures; and Corgi Super Heroes figures.
NEWS
March 13, 1999 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two sales next week will be dealing in child's play, one featuring books, the other featuring toys. The books, by such popular children's authors as Lewis Carroll and A.A. Milne, will be a highlight of the year's first sale of books, autographs, ephemera and graphics at Freeman/Fine Arts of Philadelphia. Also among the 800 lots to be sold beginning at 10 a.m. Thursday in Freeman/Fine Arts' fifth-floor gallery are more than 115 cookbooks, an offering that nicely coincides with the 1999 Book and the Cook activities here.
NEWS
December 30, 1988 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
What are you supposed to tell kids whose Christmas presents are stolen, the prosecutor wondered, "Santa got robbed"? Assistant District Attorney Tia Sutter described Richard Johnson, 31, as "The Grinch that stole Christmas. " Johnson, of Warnock Street near Brown, was ordered by Municipal Judge Edward G. Mekel yesterday to stand trial for stealing bags of Christmas toys from the Richard Allen Community Center on Parrish Drive near 10th Street, North Philadelphia, Dec. 21. "There were some unhappy kids in the project who didn't get their Christmas presents," Sutter said.
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