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Toys

NEWS
November 27, 2005 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here at the start of the seasonal shopping rush, bright-eyed tykes begin looking forward to bundles of new toys, and parents anticipate their own special holiday sentiment: Seething frustration. Fueled by the ordeal of trying to extract those toys from their packaging. These days, children's playthings don't come nestled inside their containers - they come grafted to them, immobilized by a torturer's rack of wire, tape, thread and plastic lashing. "The thing that surprised me," Haddonfield mother Merri Votta said, recalling her recent battle with a Polly Pocket doll, "is how many times the wire was twisted.
NEWS
July 31, 1993 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a prelude to two major sales in the fall and spring, Hunt Auctions of Wayne next week will offer items from two local estates: those of Henry Pleasants Jr. of West Chester, and Harold Evans of the Awbury estate near Chestnut Hill. The auction - featuring furniture, toys and ephemera - will begin at 10 a.m. Wednesday at the Holiday Inn on Route 100 in Exton. Many of the toys come from the Awbury estate, now the Awbury Arboretum, a vast walled estate formerly occupied by members of the Evans and Copes families of Chestnut Hill.
NEWS
December 22, 1988 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Arson is suspected as the cause of a fire at the Toys R Us store in Cheltenham Square mall that caused the busy store to be evacuated, a fire official said yesterday. "It was deliberately set," said Bud Carlson, assistant fire marshal. The fire began after 7 p.m. Tuesday in an aisle of towels and baby items and was moving into the ceiling, Carlson said, when a Cheltenham police officer rushed to the flames with two fire extinguishers. The officer, Cpl. John Adams, nearly put out the fire by himself, Carlson said, with the help of the store manager who furnished additional extinquishers.
NEWS
December 31, 1988 | By Jerry W. Byrd, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Army reservists in Norristown collected more than a ton of toys, clothing and school supplies for children living in a remote Honduran town, the potential impact of a four-year-old Nicaraguan contra arms-supply controversy was on no one's mind. But a 1984 law - and normal slowdowns of the holiday season - may have conspired to keep the packages grounded at Willow Grove Naval Air Station while authorities there await approvals from Honduran intermediaries, officials at a North Carolina military base and the Agency for International Development, an arm of the U.S. State Department.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1998 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The big lizard is under heavy wraps. Only disembodied glimpses are permitted: a scaly foot on a T-shirt, a set of angry eyes on a billboard, a tail, a claw, a taxi dangling from its cruel jaws. By not allowing anyone to see Godzilla in his 22-story glory before Tuesday night, Sony Pictures is sacrificing advance merchandise sales. Licensees have signed promises not to display any product that shows the full monsty until the movie finally chews up theaters. That's because Godzilla is no mere movie, says Peter Dang, executive vice president of consumer products for Sony's film arm. It's a franchise.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2003 | By STEVE GARY For the Daily News
For 20 years, buyers and sellers from all over the globe have turned to Bertoia Auctions for excellent mechanical banks, toys and dolls. Their gaze will again focus on Vineland, N.J., next Friday and Saturday, as the Bertoia clan and their experienced staff stage a gigantic Collector's Toy Chest Sale. The age, quality and condition of the items at a Bertoia auction often require that you have a pretty big toy chest and pretty deep pockets. This sale, which showcases important private collections that have never been offered at public auction, should be no exception, yet Rich Bertoia stressed that there are great opportunities for outstanding finds for collectors at all levels.
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
There will be some toying with history in Pennsauken on Saturday, with a display of playthings from the past at the open house at the Griffith Morgan House on Griffith Morgan Lane on River Road. The event, which will run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., is one of three open houses held each year at the Griffin Morgan House, a three-story structure built in 1693. A colonial cooking demonstration, live music, a craft demonstration and live animals also will be part of the day's events. "The story of toys is really the story of people from the beginning of time, because toys are a reflection of the adult world," said toymaker Joe Moczydlowski, who organized the exhibit.
NEWS
November 13, 2000 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Sotheby's in New York next month will sell at auction one of the world's largest collections of sci-fi toys, the legendary collection of robots and space play things amassed by the late collector, F. H. Griffith. More than 250 lots of science fiction toys will be offered, along with a yet to be determined number of antique cast-iron and comic character toys. The inventory represents a panorama of 20th century robot toys, including a Diamond Planet in its original box. The robot toy is expected to fetch between $30,000 and $40,000, reports Warman's Today's Collector magazine in its December edition.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2005 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At one end of the BIO 2005 biotechnology conference, everyone was talking enterprise development and synergistic intellectual property. But a few yards away, it was all about the blackjack table, Belgian chocolate and, oh yes, Ebola-virus toys. With more than 1,500 exhibitors from 30 countries and 28 states crowding the exhibit hall, a free flickering neon pen just would not do to court the business of biotech. Australia opened the wine bottles before sunset. New York offered an oxygen bar. A business-card raffle could win an iPod, a plasma TV, two free airline tickets, or a Sony PlayStation.
NEWS
October 22, 1989 | By Michele McCreary, Special to The Inquirer
A blue van filled to the brim with boxes and a mountain of trash bags raced up to the Reformed Church of Churchville last week. The driver, Rose Yeager of Churchville, got out and scurried around to the back of the van. She fervently unloaded 158 new articles of clothing, linens and even a few toys. She took them into the church meeting hall, where volunteers were sorting through more than 26,000 pieces of clothing, household linens and toys. They stacked the items in piles, which will be distributed to more than 33 agencies throughout Bucks County and the Delaware Valley.
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