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Trade Embargo

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NEWS
December 1, 1992
One of the ironies of the enduring hostility between the United States and Vietnam is that President Bush - the last of the Cold War presidents - is particularly well-placed to hasten its end. Now that Vietnam has finally come forward with serious documentation that could resolve many outstanding cases of those Americans missing in action during the Vietnam War, the time has come to reassess the relationship between these two adversaries....
NEWS
August 30, 1994
A mere week after the Cuban exodus reached crisis proportions on the high seas (and in the pre-vacation Clinton White House), a glimmer of common sense has broken through. Secretary of State Warren Christopher says the United States is ready to talk immigration issues with Havana - and, just maybe, a few other things. So far, the sky hasn't fallen. There will be rumbles, of course, from the vocal Cuban American lobby in Miami. It will read dark motives into the fact that Mr. Christopher has left the door ajar (if only slightly)
NEWS
July 13, 1999 | By Rochelle Wolf
If you're a cigar smoker, scuba diver or a veteran of the Cold War, you may have been thinking about Cuba lately. Cuba - "pearl of the Antilles," a land of contradictions, where American Express is not accepted, because it's American, and U.S. dollars are - is a Kafkaesque Disneyworld with better, less expensive rides. To 11 million Cubans and the several million exiles abroad, it's not a theme park - it's Life. Cubans are the ones who have suffered most under the ridiculous U.S. trade embargo against Cuba.
NEWS
July 3, 1994 | By Sergio R. Bustos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On Friday, almost 200 Americans returned to the United States from a week- long visit to Cuba, where their very presence was a violation of U.S. law. The Americans socialized with the Cuban people, met with Cuban government officials, even played baseball with some Cuban ballplayers, all to protest the long-standing U.S. ban on travel to the island nation. The trip, the second of its kind, was organized by The Freedom to Travel Campaign in San Francisco, part of a grass-roots effort to persuade the Clinton administration to end the 31-year-old trade embargo with Cuba and to establish diplomatic relations.
NEWS
May 11, 1986 | By Steve Stecklow, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the children's hospital here, half the incubators are broken, shelves that once held U.S.-made cancer drugs and antibiotics lie empty, and the faces of the clocks along the corridors say 7 o'clock all day long. At a car dealership, the manager opens up his desk drawer and tosses out a handful of U.S.-made pencils, erasers, staples and paper clips. Along with new cars, he says, they are some of the products not easily found these days in Nicaragua. And at the capital's only McDonald's, the Big Macs are now served in white paper bags because the restaurant no longer can obtain the familiar styrofoam boxes used in the United States.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1994 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In August, when it was clear that it was only a matter of time until the United States would lift its 19-year embargo on trade with Vietnam, Roger Stone paid a call on Vietnam's Ministry of Science, Technology and Communication. Stone, Unisys Corp.'s general manager for Southeast Asia, was with a colleague from Japan's Mitsui Corp., which has been trading in Vietnam for nearly a century. The ministry was trying to set guidelines for modernizing Vietnam's computer and telephone systems, but was painfully aware that the country's long isolation meant that few Vietnamese knew much, if anything, about state- of-the-art technology.
NEWS
January 30, 1994
It's time. That's what the Senate was saying when Democrats and Republicans voted Thursday, 62-38, to urge President Clinton to lift the trade embargo against Vietnam. It's time to put an end to the vestiges of a war that ripped this country apart and took the lives of 58,135 Americans. The issue of ending the trade ban has been politically sensitive for Mr. Clinton because he avoided military service during the Vietnam War. Many families of those still listed as missing in action in Indochina oppose ending the embargo, as do some veterans organizations.
NEWS
February 15, 1993 | by Shaun D. Mullen, Daily News Staff Writer
It was 34 years ago tomorrow that a bearded young Communist revolutionary by the name of Fidel Castro came down from the hills to overthrow the president of Cuba. Seven American presidents have come and gone since then. The Berlin Wall has been torn down and the Red Menace, as generations of Americans knew it, has been exorcised not with a bang, but a whimper. But Castro, in the face of a tough U.S. trade embargo imposed in 1962, has clung tenaciously to power in one of the last bastions of old-style Communism.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2004 | By L. Stuart Ditzen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From offices in Bala Cynwyd, Stefan and Don Brodie spent 20 years building a thriving, worldwide business only to find themselves snared in a legal dilemma that threatened them with ruin - and jail. Their experience, after four years of criminal and civil litigation, illustrates the problems America's 41-year-old Cuban trade embargo can present to an unsuspecting business. It amounts to a Catch-22: While the U.S. bans trade with Cuba, other nations make it a crime to obey the U.S. embargo in their countries.
NEWS
September 30, 1993 | Daily News wire services
WASHINGTON CLINTON DEFENDS EMBATTLED BROWN President Clinton defended Commerce Secretary Ron Brown yesterday against accusations he was paid to lift the trade embargo against Vietnam as two House Republicans demanded appointment of a special prosecutor. The FBI and a federal grand jury in Miami are investigating the allegations by a Vietnamese businessman that Brown accepted $700,000 from the Vietnamese government to work toward lifting of the U.S. trade embargo against that nation.
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BUSINESS
April 3, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - A majority of Cuban Americans, whose opposition to the Communist regime in Cuba helped cement a 50-year U.S. trade embargo, now support normalizing trade relations between the two countries, according to a poll taken since President Obama's call for closer ties in December. The survey of 400 Cuban Americans by pollsters Bendixen & Amandi International, Miami, done in mid-March after the community had had three months to debate the new policy, showed 51 percent approved of Obama's call to end the embargo and improve trade relations, and 40 percent against.
TRAVEL
April 29, 2013 | By Val Proudkii, For The Inquirer
HAVANA - Clarinets, reedy and thin, played something I'd never heard before. The low whine hung like humidity up and down narrow Consulado Avenue in Old Havana. I cocked my ear and detected the music coming from somewhere upstairs, through windows of a decaying, Spanish colonial-looking apartment building within sight of the national opera house. Brightening with each step as I drew closer, the sound wove an unforgettable sonic tapestry somewhere between laughing klezmer and the noble shriek of bagpipes.
NEWS
December 2, 2012 | Reviewed by Bob Hoover
Thomas Jefferson The Art of Power By Jon Meacham Random House. 493 pp. $35   Monticello perches on high ground outside Charlottesville, Va., an American version of Olympus, and its rarefied air contributes to the feeling of otherworldliness. From the serene design of the main house to the orderliness of the grounds, Thomas Jefferson's home is a magical place. Jon Meacham breathed a lungful of that atmosphere as he researched his effusive treatment of the most sainted of the Founders.
NEWS
April 13, 2012 | By Kevin G. Hall, McClatchy Newspapers
ON THE CARRETERA CENTRAL, Cuba - "Subanse," climb aboard, I said repeatedly, pulling the right wheels of my eight-seat van off the dangerous two-lane highway that snakes hundreds of miles across an island most Americans consider off limits. Ostensibly, I was in Cuba to cover Pope Benedict XVI's visit. But over the week and across the Ohio-size country, I gave more than five dozen Cubans a botella - in Cuban slang, a ride. My riders gave an unvarnished view of the country.
NEWS
January 1, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
After he sold his family business in 1986 to his son, Donald B. Remmey decided to help the homeless. Working with the Philadelphia arm of the Catholic Worker Movement, his son, Donald Jr., said, Mr. Remmey in the 1990s helped rebuild houses in the Yorktown neighborhood of North Philadelphia. And for the last 15 years, his son said, Mr. Remmey, who lived in Abington Township, helped with breakfasts for the homeless on two mornings a week at the Kensington office of St. Francis Inn. On Dec. 15, during a trip to attend a sister-in-law's funeral, Mr. Remmey, 86, took ill. He died of endocarditis at San Diego Hospice in Carlsbad, Calif.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2007 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Despite persistent opposition in Congress and from the Bush administration to Cuba's communist government, American trade and travel restrictions on that island nation likely will be lifted one day. And when they are, the Duane Morris L.L.P. law firm in Philadelphia wants to be there to reap what some think will be a windfall in legal and consulting fees. Duane Morris, one of Philadelphia's largest law firms, with 650 lawyers, is one of a handful of professional-services firms nationwide positioning themselves to guide clients who want to do business in Cuba through the thicket of bureaucratic and political obstacles.
SPORTS
February 7, 2006 | By Rob Parent INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Keith Primeau is not ready to give up hope of playing again this season, but the Flyers center admits that resignation day could come at any time. Still feeling the effects of a concussion suffered on Oct. 28, Primeau was in Toronto yesterday to be examined by a specialist. There was growing speculation that Primeau was on the verge of being put on injured reserve for the remainder of the regular season, and he said yesterday that sitting out might be his best option. He said he had "been advised by the doctors that it may be in my best interests to forgo playing this year and continue my rehab in hopes of returning in September," Primeau said in a statement released on the Flyers' Web site.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2004 | By L. Stuart Ditzen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From offices in Bala Cynwyd, Stefan and Don Brodie spent 20 years building a thriving, worldwide business only to find themselves snared in a legal dilemma that threatened them with ruin - and jail. Their experience, after four years of criminal and civil litigation, illustrates the problems America's 41-year-old Cuban trade embargo can present to an unsuspecting business. It amounts to a Catch-22: While the U.S. bans trade with Cuba, other nations make it a crime to obey the U.S. embargo in their countries.
NEWS
August 8, 2003 | By Robert Koehler
What is it we're bringing to Iraq? Oh yeah, democracy. One body at a time. Now that two of Saddam Hussein's evil offspring are deader than doornails (whoop! whoop!), majority rule, free and fair elections, constitutional government, maybe even butterfly ballots and $2,000-a-plate fund-raisers - the works - are pretty much right around the corner. Or not. Before we try to topple another dictator and liberate another country, perhaps next time with the help of new-generation, low-yield, precision-guided nuclear weapons, let's thrust a limb into the gears of our trillion-dollar war machine long enough to ponder its basic assumption: that is, that it gets results.
NEWS
June 17, 2003 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ruling that the prosecutors' improper comments may have swayed the jury more than the government's evidence, a federal judge ordered a new trial yesterday for two men and a Bala Cynwyd company accused of violating the 42-year-old U.S. trade embargo against Cuba. The comments by two federal prosecutors during closing arguments in April 2002 were flagged immediately by U.S. District Judge Mary A. McLaughlin, who ordered jurors to ignore them. But McLaughlin wrote in her opinion yesterday that "no curative instructions could have cured the array of improper arguments made here.
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