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Trade School

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NEWS
June 7, 1991 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Three former students of the Watterson School of Business and Technology say they enrolled in the Fern Rock school in hopes of learning a trade and finding an escape from poverty. Instead, their attorneys contend, the students got a con job and a lot of broken promises. Alleging the school is nothing more than a scam to steal tax-funded federal school grants and loans, the lawyers in federal court yesterday accused Career-Com Corp., the school's parent company, of racketeering and fraud.
NEWS
June 2, 1988 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
The idea of opening a free trade school for "poor and deserving young men" in Delaware County was born in 1888. The man behind the idea was Bucks County native Isaiah Vansant Williamson, the son of Quakers who wanted other young men to have the opportunity to acquire the type of trade skills that he learned in his youth - skills that had enabled him to build a successful business career. Over the years, The Williamson Free School of Mechanical Trades in Middletown has turned out more than 2,500 tradesmen, many of whom went on to become self-made millionaires.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1994 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
A federal judge has ordered the owners of PTC Career Institute, the defunct trade school in Philadelphia, to pay $131,000 to former employees of the Philadelphia school and schools in five other cities. The U.S. Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Division sued PTC, at 40 N. 2nd St., in February. The division claimed that the school's owners, Richard and Rimona Friedberg of Villanova, their daughter, Miryam Friedberg Mishkin, and her husband, William Mishkin, had violated federal minimum-wage and overtime laws.
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Officials at the Williamson Free School of Mechanical Trades discovered just how much of a millstone the institution's name could be when it looked as if it might cost them millions. Philanthropist Henry M. Rowan had promised the Delaware County school $5 million if the post-secondary institution could match the grant with additional donations. When board members began calling potential donors, not only was the private school unknown to many, its name clouded its mission. Then a branding expert delivered more bad news.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1993 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Pennsylvania has decided that the much-criticized PTC Career Institute at 40 N. 2nd St. in Center City should be closed. The state Education Department's Board of Private Licensed Schools issued an order last week revoking the licenses held by the school's parent, Philadelphia Training Center Corp. in West Conshohocken. The order prohibits the school from enrolling more students and orders it to return pre-paid tuition. Does that mean the school is closed? That it won't try to sign up new students?
NEWS
February 21, 1992 | By Kevin McKinney, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Two former executives of the Downingtown Industrial and Agricultural School have been arrested on charges of embezzling $185,929 from the institution over the last four years, authorities said yesterday. Police allege that the couple used the money for a variety of personal purchases and to boost their income. Hersey Gray and his wife, Myrtis Gray, of the 500 block of Chestnut Street in Coatesville, are accused of stealing public funds from the school between 1987 and 1991.
NEWS
September 24, 2010 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, campisg@phillynews.com 215-854-5935
The parents of a freshman who was fatally shocked last year at a Delaware County trade school sued the school this week. Laurie and Michael Savage Sr. of Glenolden said in a lawsuit filed Wednesday that their son, Michael Jr., 18, had not been properly trained or supervised and had not had the proper equipment when he was sent to work on an energized commercial light fixture at the power plant on the campus of the Williamson Free School of Mechanical Trades...
NEWS
October 4, 2005 | By Jeremy Barker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Students from Harrison Career Institute, a private trade school based in Voorhees that appears to be the subject of a federal criminal probe, say the school failed to deliver promised training, externships and jobs in their areas of study. "They told me I'd get an externship, but once I enrolled, they said there were no externships available in dialysis," said Kelly Covington, 39, of Northeast Philadelphia, a former Harrison student. "I felt like I was conned. . . . Once they got you in there, they just totally ignored you. " According to the U.S. Department of Education, Covington is not alone.
NEWS
December 17, 1993 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Daylight had barely touched the campus when the young men started to line up in front of the main building. "Prepare for inspection," yelled senior class president P.J. Hajduk once the 240 students, dressed in blazers and ties, not military uniforms, formed three rows. On time, shoes shined, faces cleanshaven - lapses in any of those areas could mean several hours of work on the grounds Saturday. But this morning, all seemed in order. Roll was taken, the flag was raised and, at 6:45 a.m., another day had begun at the Williamson Free School of Mechanical Trades - the last all-male, free post-secondary private trade school in the country.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | By Barbara Evans Sorid, Special to The Inquirer
Some people might pour themselves a stiff drink after a final exam, but Jeff Anastasi had to mix one to pass his. First, he filled a glass with ice. Then, he carefully poured 1 1/2 ounces of vodka and a half-ounce of Kahlua into the glass. After a slight stirring, the drink was ready. Perfect, said his instructor. Anastasi, 20, breathed a sigh of relief. Final exams were officially over, and with the creation of the Black Russian, he was ready to graduate. For Anastasi, of Williamstown, the certificate from the International Bartending School in Cherry Hill was as precious as any degree.
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NEWS
August 28, 2016
By Jeffrey Rosen Yale University Press. 256 pp. $25. Reviewed by Chris Mondics Louis D. Brandeis was born and raised in Louisville, Ky., but the turning point in his life may have come in a German school. Because of the economic panic of 1873, his father, Adolph, saw his tobacco and textile business collapse, and he took the family back to Europe. (They had come to the United States 20 years earlier from Prague by way of Germany.) The family settled in Dresden. There, Louis was admitted to a realschule, essentially a trade school.
NEWS
June 8, 2016 | By Tommy Rowan, Staff Writer
A 19-year-old Hunting Park woman who in April pleaded guilty to voluntary manslaughter in the deadly stabbing of a teenager during a brawl in North Philadelphia was sentenced Monday to eight to 16 years in prison. Keyarra Frisby stabbed Anita Cotton, 17, in the neck during a melee in the parking lot of a Walgreens store at 4201 N. Broad St. early last July 5. In exchange for her plea, prosecutors dropped a murder charge. Police said the bloody encounter started as a fight between two groups of girls, with Cotton and Frisby on opposite sides, on South Street following a Fourth of July fireworks display.
NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
A 19-year-old woman has pleaded guilty in the fatal stabbing of another teen during a Hunting Park brawl last year. Keyarra Frisby pleaded guilty last week to a felony charge of voluntary manslaughter and a misdemeanor charge of possession of an instrument of crime. In the early-morning hours of July 5, Frisby, of Hunting Park, stabbed Anita Cotton, 17, in the neck during a melee outside a Walgreens on the 4200 block of North Broad Street, near Hunting Park Avenue. Frisby is scheduled to be sentenced June 6 before Common Pleas Judge Lillian Ransom.
NEWS
February 14, 2016
DEAR ABBY: I am 18 and in my sophomore year of college. A month ago, my family went through some major hardships. It came out that "Uncle Mark" has been cheating on my aunt for years and is moving his mistress to our area. They have two children, a son in elementary school and a daughter, "Dana," 13. I feel bad for my aunt, but I'm absolutely devastated for Dana. My Uncle Mark has skipped all of her school events in the wake of this mess, and I can't begin to imagine how disappointed Dana must feel.
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Radnor High School teachers, who two weeks ago instituted a ban on writing college recommendation letters to protest their stalled contract talks, said Wednesday they will resume writing the letters after being "overwhelmed" by responses from parents. Radnor Township Education Association president David Wood also said the school board has scheduled several meetings with the union. The letter-writing protest rattled the highly competitive district, where more than 95 percent of students go on to attend college, university, or trade school.
NEWS
September 10, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Quake was back at Bok. Daniel "Quake" Gibbons, a proud member of the Class of '93 and an immovable force on the offensive line of the Bok Technical High football team, had read on Facebook about an alumni gathering at a new restaurant atop his alma mater's roof. Gibbons wasn't going to miss it. He was looking forward to busting it up with his old Wildcats teammates, catching up with the cheerleaders, and maybe even running into some of his old auto-body shop teachers. The posting said to bring Bok gear if you had it, so Gibbons, who is 41 and works as a security guard in West Philadelphia, proudly broke out his royal blue 1992 division championship jacket.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
SENIOR Alexa Moore remembers when, as an underclassman, she'd watch Mastery Charter School seniors cheer on the next chapters in their lives, college, military service or trade schools. "When you're up there watching, you kind of get bored because you're not the person that's celebrating," said Moore, 18, who will soon graduate from Mastery Charter School/Lenfest Campus. Yesterday it was her turn and that of about 564 other Mastery seniors to embrace their new chapters at the annual Mastery College Signing Day held at Temple University's Liacouras Center.
NEWS
May 28, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MARY JACKSON was a woman of many talents, most of them directed at helping others. Such as her skill with herbal remedies. You have an angry liver? Mary had a remedy. Constipation? Ditto. Respiratory problem? Drink her concoction and you'll breathe easier. Mary wasn't a doctor, but she had made a serious study of herbal medication. She didn't claim cures, but her remedies made sufferers feel better. Mary Elizabeth Crawford Allen Jackson, a 32-year employee in the payroll department of the companies that owned the Daily News and Inquirer, a devoted churchwoman, dedicated traveler and loving family matriarch, died May 14 of cancer.
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Officials at the Williamson Free School of Mechanical Trades discovered just how much of a millstone the institution's name could be when it looked as if it might cost them millions. Philanthropist Henry M. Rowan had promised the Delaware County school $5 million if the post-secondary institution could match the grant with additional donations. When board members began calling potential donors, not only was the private school unknown to many, its name clouded its mission. Then a branding expert delivered more bad news.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patrons of the Institute for Colored Youth in Philadelphia founded the historic school in the mid-19th century so their students would be prepared for the day when equality arrived. But graduate Octavius V. Catto couldn't wait that long. The civil rights hero took what he learned at the school that would become Cheyney University and used it to speed up the process. So did many of his classmates - but with much less attention paid to them. A new digital history project at Villanova University aims to change that.
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