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Trade School

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NEWS
June 7, 1991 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Three former students of the Watterson School of Business and Technology say they enrolled in the Fern Rock school in hopes of learning a trade and finding an escape from poverty. Instead, their attorneys contend, the students got a con job and a lot of broken promises. Alleging the school is nothing more than a scam to steal tax-funded federal school grants and loans, the lawyers in federal court yesterday accused Career-Com Corp., the school's parent company, of racketeering and fraud.
NEWS
June 2, 1988 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
The idea of opening a free trade school for "poor and deserving young men" in Delaware County was born in 1888. The man behind the idea was Bucks County native Isaiah Vansant Williamson, the son of Quakers who wanted other young men to have the opportunity to acquire the type of trade skills that he learned in his youth - skills that had enabled him to build a successful business career. Over the years, The Williamson Free School of Mechanical Trades in Middletown has turned out more than 2,500 tradesmen, many of whom went on to become self-made millionaires.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1994 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
A federal judge has ordered the owners of PTC Career Institute, the defunct trade school in Philadelphia, to pay $131,000 to former employees of the Philadelphia school and schools in five other cities. The U.S. Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Division sued PTC, at 40 N. 2nd St., in February. The division claimed that the school's owners, Richard and Rimona Friedberg of Villanova, their daughter, Miryam Friedberg Mishkin, and her husband, William Mishkin, had violated federal minimum-wage and overtime laws.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1993 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Pennsylvania has decided that the much-criticized PTC Career Institute at 40 N. 2nd St. in Center City should be closed. The state Education Department's Board of Private Licensed Schools issued an order last week revoking the licenses held by the school's parent, Philadelphia Training Center Corp. in West Conshohocken. The order prohibits the school from enrolling more students and orders it to return pre-paid tuition. Does that mean the school is closed? That it won't try to sign up new students?
NEWS
February 21, 1992 | By Kevin McKinney, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Two former executives of the Downingtown Industrial and Agricultural School have been arrested on charges of embezzling $185,929 from the institution over the last four years, authorities said yesterday. Police allege that the couple used the money for a variety of personal purchases and to boost their income. Hersey Gray and his wife, Myrtis Gray, of the 500 block of Chestnut Street in Coatesville, are accused of stealing public funds from the school between 1987 and 1991.
NEWS
September 24, 2010 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, campisg@phillynews.com 215-854-5935
The parents of a freshman who was fatally shocked last year at a Delaware County trade school sued the school this week. Laurie and Michael Savage Sr. of Glenolden said in a lawsuit filed Wednesday that their son, Michael Jr., 18, had not been properly trained or supervised and had not had the proper equipment when he was sent to work on an energized commercial light fixture at the power plant on the campus of the Williamson Free School of Mechanical Trades...
NEWS
October 4, 2005 | By Jeremy Barker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Students from Harrison Career Institute, a private trade school based in Voorhees that appears to be the subject of a federal criminal probe, say the school failed to deliver promised training, externships and jobs in their areas of study. "They told me I'd get an externship, but once I enrolled, they said there were no externships available in dialysis," said Kelly Covington, 39, of Northeast Philadelphia, a former Harrison student. "I felt like I was conned. . . . Once they got you in there, they just totally ignored you. " According to the U.S. Department of Education, Covington is not alone.
NEWS
December 17, 1993 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Daylight had barely touched the campus when the young men started to line up in front of the main building. "Prepare for inspection," yelled senior class president P.J. Hajduk once the 240 students, dressed in blazers and ties, not military uniforms, formed three rows. On time, shoes shined, faces cleanshaven - lapses in any of those areas could mean several hours of work on the grounds Saturday. But this morning, all seemed in order. Roll was taken, the flag was raised and, at 6:45 a.m., another day had begun at the Williamson Free School of Mechanical Trades - the last all-male, free post-secondary private trade school in the country.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | By Barbara Evans Sorid, Special to The Inquirer
Some people might pour themselves a stiff drink after a final exam, but Jeff Anastasi had to mix one to pass his. First, he filled a glass with ice. Then, he carefully poured 1 1/2 ounces of vodka and a half-ounce of Kahlua into the glass. After a slight stirring, the drink was ready. Perfect, said his instructor. Anastasi, 20, breathed a sigh of relief. Final exams were officially over, and with the creation of the Black Russian, he was ready to graduate. For Anastasi, of Williamstown, the certificate from the International Bartending School in Cherry Hill was as precious as any degree.
NEWS
September 24, 1996 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Williamson Free School of Mechanical Trades, which aspires to teach its students a code of values as well as an occupation, makes retired Air Force Col. Paul A. Reid feel right at home. "This is not a military school," said Reid, 50, who took over the reins of the 107-year-old institution in Delaware County on Aug. 1, "but there is a dress code and a strong element of discipline. Our job is to help mold young men. " At Williamson - an all-male, free, post-secondary private trade school - "we're not ashamed that we stand for values," said Reid, who will be formally installed as president Friday.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
RADNOR Jillian Hughes attends a public school with 22 Advanced Placement courses, 96 percent of students going on to college or trade school, and a sense of community so strong that 300 students formed a club just to turn up and cheer at school sporting events. "We have everything we need," Hughes, 15, said of Radnor High. Moved by the Philadelphia School District's extraordinary budget crunch and the wide gulf between her own education and that of city students, Hughes recently gathered and distributed supplies for pupils at one Philadelphia elementary school.
NEWS
September 11, 2013 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
A day after he allegedly stabbed a homeless man to death in Doylestown, Dale Wakefield told his sister he "just snapped. " Calling from his cellphone on July 3, Wakefield told her he was drinking at Mugs to celebrate his 21st birthday and then started to walk home to her apartment. "He said there was a man who said something to him next to the bus station, asking him for money," Wendy Wakefield testified Monday in Warrington District Court. "He tried to ignore him. And then the man kept on asking him for things and shoved him. And my brother just snapped.
NEWS
July 14, 2013 | By Chris Palmer and Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writers
Bucks County officials were irate Friday after a man charged with murdering a homeless man in Doylestown last week was set free Thursday morning from a Baltimore jail while awaiting extradition to Pennsylvania. Dale Wakefield Jr., 21, was recaptured around 6 a.m. Thursday by the Baltimore homicide unit, about four hours after he had been released, officials said Friday. Bucks County District Attorney David Heckler said he did not know why Wakefield was released, but called the incident "totally unacceptable and outrageous.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | BY OSCAR CASTILLO, Daily News Staff Writer castilo@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
IT WAS ONE of those busy days at Kensington High School for the Creative and Performing Arts (CAPA), the kind of day where you can't even get to a computer, senior Angel Hardy said. Upon finally checking her email, the 18-year-old from Germantown received some highly anticipated news and actually screamed. A counselor rushed back into the room to investigate the yelp, saw the email, hugged Hardy and ran to the principal's office. Before Hardy could utter a word of the news to anyone, she heard it broadcast over the school's loudspeaker.
SPORTS
April 10, 2013 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writersilaryt@phillynews.com
HERE'S A NOTE for anyone out there with a messed-up '69 Camaro: If you'd like to sell it cheap or hire someone to spearhead its return to glory, Dylan Burke, who considers that ride the best of all time, might be your man. Burke is a 5-10, 150-pound senior lefthander for Abraham Lincoln High and, for now, his best talent is pitching. But he also has a passion for cars, which is why he intends to enroll at a trade school upon graduation and soak up more knowledge about the automotive world's ins and outs.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Miguelina Rodriguez walks into an alternative school program at an East Camden church for the start of the semester Thursday, she will pick up books and return home. No teachers will be there to help with a math equation, or classmates to study with. The Community Education Resource Network (CERN) has shut its in-house alternative program at Bethel United Methodist Church for lack of funding. It will support home schooling, but even that is on the verge of extinction. Townsend Press in Berlin has donated take-home material, but CERN founder Angel Cordero said the core of the program depends on students receiving face-to-face instruction.
NEWS
August 18, 2012
Joe Kubert, the influential comic book artist and writer whose rugged, hyper-masculine artwork included Tarzan, the flying super-hero Hawkman, the World War II infantryman Sgt. Rock, and graphic novels about the Bosnian war and the Holocaust, died Aug. 12 at a hospital in Morristown, N.J. A spokesman at Mr. Kubert's comic trade school, the Dover, N.J.-based Kubert School, said the cause was multiple myeloma. Mr. Kubert, whose career spanned more than seven decades, started in comic books during the industry's infancy as a boy prodigy.
NEWS
November 10, 2010 | By VALERIE RUSS, russv@phillynews.com 215-854-5987
The leader of a community organization and an urban-planning firm have reached out to help Leroy Sterling complete his vision for a masonry business and trade school, which he planned for American Street in Kensington. It's a project that Sterling claims in a lawsuit to have scuttled after the city seized the vacant land he had bought across the street from the Crane Arts Building, a former plumbing factory that had been converted to studios and exhibit space. His story was in Monday's Daily News . The suit, now in federal court, names as defendants the city of Philadelphia, the Redevelopment Authority (RDA)
NEWS
September 24, 2010 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, campisg@phillynews.com 215-854-5935
The parents of a freshman who was fatally shocked last year at a Delaware County trade school sued the school this week. Laurie and Michael Savage Sr. of Glenolden said in a lawsuit filed Wednesday that their son, Michael Jr., 18, had not been properly trained or supervised and had not had the proper equipment when he was sent to work on an energized commercial light fixture at the power plant on the campus of the Williamson Free School of Mechanical Trades...
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