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Trade

SPORTS
April 27, 2016 | By Sam Carchidi, STAFF WRITER
The Flyers are a year ahead of schedule. By using a late-season surge to earn a surprising playoff berth and then extending Stanley Cup favorite Washington to six games, young players Shayne Gostisbehere, Nick Cousins, and Brandon Manning gained unexpected and invaluable experience. In addition, Vinny Lecavalier's retirement assures them of $2.25 million in increased salary-cap space and could help them land a much-needed top-six forward in the offseason free-agent market. The Flyers (41-27-14)
SPORTS
April 27, 2016 | Daily News Staff
(In the agenda, the Daily News will examine a major issue of the day in Philadelphia sports. We will frame the question and look at it from multiple angles, bringing you opinions from a sports staff unmatched in its experience. The Agenda will run occasionally, only in the Daily News). Les Bowen: I would press for a meeting to try to smooth this over. Take Sam out to dinner. (Jeffrey Lurie knows a nice spot in Fargo, N.D.). Reiterate that he's the QB in 2016, the team should be decent, if Bradford is healthy and productive he'll either be here again as the starter in 2017 or get a bunch of money from somebody else.
SPORTS
April 25, 2016 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
It is an interesting quirk of fate that Doug Pederson begins his tenure as Eagles head coach with the team holding the No. 2 pick in the NFL draft, exactly as was the case when Andy Reid took over 17 years ago. The histories of Pederson and Reid have been so intertwined that the obvious comparison as the Eagles prepare to select quarterback Carson Wentz on Thursday is to equate that with Reid's choice of Donovan McNabb in 1999. Re-creating Reid's tenure here, down to the opening draft pick of that era, isn't the worst thing to do. The man went to the playoffs in nine of his 14 seasons with the Eagles, won 130 regular-season and 10 postseason games, and was overseer of the longest sustained period of success in franchise history.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2016 | By Mark Zandi
Economists are gnashing their teeth over much of the back-and-forth about global trade in the presidential campaign. Mostly, the candidates are dissing the potential trade deal between the U.S. and other Pacific-rim nations, known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), and global trade in general. The candidates either didn't take Economics 101 in college, or they are ignoring what they learned - that global trade is a plus for the economy, and thus for jobs and incomes. Kiboshing trade deals is for the most part bad economics.
SPORTS
April 22, 2016 | By Zach Berman, STAFF WRITER
Sam Bradford learned about the Eagles' trade for the No. 2 overall pick before practice on Wednesday. He spoke with owner Jeffrey Lurie, top football executive Howie Roseman and coach Doug Pederson. Bradford was told he would be the Eagles' starting quarterback this season even though the team made a blockbuster deal that is expected to bring North Dakota State quarterback Carson Wentz to Philadelphia if the Los Angeles Rams take Cal quarterback Jared Goff with the No. 1 pick. Then Bradford went onto the field to practice for an organization that gave him a two-year, $36 million contract last month and is prepared to draft his likely replacement next week.
SPORTS
April 22, 2016 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Columnist
THIS IS what the Eagles should have done: After snookering the Miami Dolphins out of the eighth pick in the draft last month, they should have sat on their hands, selected one of the three of four appealing options that figure to be on the board at No. 8 next Thursday - Ronnie Stanley? Ezekiel Elliott? Vernon Hargreaves? - and taken a well-deserved bow. Instead, they overdosed on testosterone and decided to show the rest of the NFL how smart they are. "We're going to invest in quarterbacks," executive vice president of football operations Howie Roseman said after the Eagles swapped a batch of draft picks, among them the No. 8 pick, their first-round selection next year and a second-round pick in 2018, to Cleveland for the second pick in the draft, which they plan to use on the Los Angeles Rams' sloppy seconds - either Division I-AA product Carson Wentz or Cal's Jared Goff.
SPORTS
April 19, 2016 | By Matt Gelb, STAFF WRITER
In the season's first two weeks, the Phillies received more production from the No. 9 spot in the lineup than what their leadoff hitters mustered. The manager batted Freddy Galvis first on Sunday "for lack of a better option" and, naturally, Galvis stood at the plate in the most decisive moment of a 3-2 comeback win over Washington. He was the perfect hitter to oppose Jonathan Papelbon. The diminutive but aggressive shortstop swung at a fastball, high and outside. The ball sailed over Jayson Werth's head in left.
NEWS
April 17, 2016
The Other Slavery The Uncovered Story of Indian Enslavement in America By Andrés Reséndez Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 431 pp. $30 Reviewed by Peter Lewis Farmer X lived close by our house. Late Sunday night, he'd drive to town, bail 10 blotto men out of the drunk tank, and truck them to the farm. Next morning, oh, boy, were those men surprised. It took them about 10 days to pay off Farmer X: long hours, squalid housing, painful encounters with yellow jackets.
TRAVEL
April 11, 2016
Because many cities popular with tourists are on the water, often the best way to get a good view of them is by boat. Many services offer expensive boat excursions operated by tour operators. We've found that the best, and cheapest, option is to hop aboard a ferry that local commuters take. The nearest example of nautical tourism is the Staten Island Ferry in New York. This free boat ride whisks visitors from lower Manhattan to Staten Island and back, offering a wonderful view of the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island along the way. The ferry operates 24/7, providing a particularly romantic nighttime excursion.
NEWS
April 6, 2016
WITH $9.7 billion in capital projects being proposed by the Kenney administration over the next six years, every taxpayer should know what a Project Labor Agreement is, because PLAs, as they are commonly called, will determine who gets those billions in public money. A PLA is a collective bargaining agreement between a government agency and labor organizations. PLAs establish the terms of employment for specific construction projects. Building trade unions say PLAs are good. Non-union shops say they're bad. That's because PLAs do two things: They keep unionized workers from engaging in labor disputes that can drive up the costs on taxpayer-funded construction projects, and they often keep nonunionized workers from ever getting on the job in the first place.
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