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Trademark Infringement

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NEWS
September 4, 1991 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
What Marie McBrien had in mind was having some fun with ghouls, ghosts, long-legged beasts and other things that go bump in the night. And the prospect of big money. Instead, she got nasty letters, a lawsuit and disputes that get dumped into federal court. And she's spending a lot of money on lawyers. McBrien's firm, Point Pleasant Canoe Rental & Sales Inc. of Bucks County, is best known for its summertime business of sending people down the Delaware River in inner tubes.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1992 | ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer staff writer Susan Warner contributed to this article
Michael Alexandru, owner of Philadelphia's Pizza Station, flipped more than a pizza crust yesterday when he received notice that Little Caesar's, the national pizza chain, had sued him for trademark infringement. Little Caesar Enterprises Inc., of Detroit, which operates some of its stores under the name Little Caesar's Pizza Station filed suit in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia on Friday, claiming Alexandru's restaurant infringes on its trademark. "Here we are trying to make a living and a giant is trying to step on us," said Alexandru, owner of the Pizza Station on West Wyoming Avenue in the city's Feltonville section.
NEWS
April 28, 1999 | By Deirdre Shaw, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
With no name, does Reji and Sara Abraham's convenience store exist? With no name, will it smell as sweet? The No Name Food Store on Springfield Road was christened Monday night after the Abrahams were given a final order by a federal judge April 8 to abandon their store's former name - 7-Heaven - because it infringed on the trademark of 7-Eleven. "It's a new life," said Reji Abraham yesterday, happy about the end of a legal battle that began in October 1996, when Southland Corp.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1994 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
SmithKline Beecham announced yesterday that it had settled a patent and trademark-infringement lawsuit filed against two companies over Tagamet, SmithKline's peptic ulcer medicine. SmithKline filed the lawsuit earlier this week in federal court in Philadelphia, naming as defendants Novopharm USA, a pharmaceuticals manufacturer, and Schein Pharmaceutical Inc., which has agreed to distribute Novopharm's generic cimetidine tablets. Cimetidine is the active component of Tagamet. "We are pleased with this outcome, and we will continue to protect our rights when necessary," said Jerry Karabelas, president of SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals-North America.
NEWS
October 31, 2000 | By Aamer Madhani, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Mount Laurel manufacturer of the Super Soaker squirt gun is dripping with anger over what it says is a blatant knockoff of its product. Larami Ltd., a Hasbro subsidiary that also makes several Nerf products, filed a civil lawsuit in U.S. District Court on Friday, alleging trademark infringement of the Super Soaker by the Odd Job Trading Corp. of Columbus, Ohio, and distributor Oxford Products of North Jersey. Al Davis, executive vice president of Larami, said a Larami employee noticed an imitation Super Soaker at a South Jersey discount store owned by Odd Job about 10 days ago. According to the lawsuit, the squirt gun was being marketed as the Super Squirt and was distributed by Oxford Products.
NEWS
September 4, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
"SUBLIMINAL confusion. " "Irreparable harm. " "Tortious acts. " At times, a lawsuit filed by Chickie's and Pete's parent company, CPC Properties Inc., sounds more like a document on mind control than a case of trademark infringement. But in a ruling handed down late last month, a federal judge determined that a Philadelphia pizza shop had infringed on the restaurant chain's trademarked Crabfries by placing a picture of a crab on their menus and ads next to the word "fries. " However, the judge denied Chickie's and Pete's claims of unjust enrichment, which would have allowed the chain to seek restitution against Tony's Place, the pizzeria in question on Frankford Avenue near Stirling Street in Mayfair.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The Navajo Nation has filed a federal lawsuit against Urban Outfitters Inc., alleging that the Philadelphia-based retailer committed trademark infringement by marketing and selling products that use the American Indian tribe's marks and names without a licensing or vendor agreement. In the civil action filed in U.S. District Court in New Mexico, the tribe and its commercial subsidiaries seek damages and an order stopping Urban Outfitters from using the names   "Navajo   " and   "Navaho " and marks on goods that compete with its own trademarked jewelry, housewares, and clothing.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oops! The catchy name selected for the city's new bike-sharing program, "Indego," is a registered trademark of a Cleveland company, which says it will investigate if it should try to block Philadelphia from using the name. Mayor Nutter unveiled the $16 million bike-share program Wednesday at a City Hall event. The Indego name was designed to celebrate the $8.5 million contribution to the program by Independence Blue Cross, combining "independence" and "go. " The name and an accompanying logo are to be prominently displayed on 600 bikes and 60 docking stations around the city when the program is launched in the spring.
NEWS
October 19, 2006 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here's a lawsuit with some meat to it. Pat's King of Steaks, the South Philadelphia sandwich emporium, has taken its beef with Rick's Original Steaks to U.S. District Court. In a filing Monday, Pat's alleges trademark infringement, trademark dilution and unfair competition. It contends Rick's is confusing people by unfairly using its trademarks "Pat's Steaks," "Pat's King of Steaks," and crown logo at Rick's Reading Terminal Market and Citizens Bank Park operations. The suit, seeking unspecified damages, mentions the May 23 interview of Rick's Steaks owner Rick Olivieri on NBC's Today, in which Pat's was referenced.
NEWS
December 15, 1987 | New York Daily News
American Express accused three sex novelty companies yesterday of hitting below the belt. The financial services company said in a Manhattan Federal Court suit that the firms tarnished the American Express image by peddling a "sleazy" greeting card containing a condom and the phrase, "Never Leave Home Without It. " The look-alike card is fashioned in slick green-and-white cardboard in the same shape and size as the American Express credit...
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NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oops! The catchy name selected for the city's new bike-sharing program, "Indego," is a registered trademark of a Cleveland company, which says it will investigate if it should try to block Philadelphia from using the name. Mayor Nutter unveiled the $16 million bike-share program Wednesday at a City Hall event. The Indego name was designed to celebrate the $8.5 million contribution to the program by Independence Blue Cross, combining "independence" and "go. " The name and an accompanying logo are to be prominently displayed on 600 bikes and 60 docking stations around the city when the program is launched in the spring.
NEWS
September 4, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
"SUBLIMINAL confusion. " "Irreparable harm. " "Tortious acts. " At times, a lawsuit filed by Chickie's and Pete's parent company, CPC Properties Inc., sounds more like a document on mind control than a case of trademark infringement. But in a ruling handed down late last month, a federal judge determined that a Philadelphia pizza shop had infringed on the restaurant chain's trademarked Crabfries by placing a picture of a crab on their menus and ads next to the word "fries. " However, the judge denied Chickie's and Pete's claims of unjust enrichment, which would have allowed the chain to seek restitution against Tony's Place, the pizzeria in question on Frankford Avenue near Stirling Street in Mayfair.
NEWS
April 30, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The New Jersey Divorce Center offers help with low-cost, simple divorces. So does the NJ Divorce Center. The New Jersey Divorce Center sells its services on its website, with a distinctive black background, royal-blue type, and an eye-catching headline that scrolls across the screen from right to left. So does the NJ Divorce Center: Black background, blue type, scrolling headline, right to left. Here's one difference: The New Jersey Divorce Center, headquartered in Pleasantville with offices in Cherry Hill, is the plaintiff in a trademark lawsuit filed in federal court in Camden this month.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
MODEL NAOMI CAMPBELL accepted libel damages Thursday from Britain's Daily Telegraph newspaper over a story that falsely claimed she was planning an elephant polo match in India for her partner's birthday. Whoa! Who the heck dreamed that one up? The November article in the Daily Telegraph said Naomi was going to organize the tournament (a/k/a stampede) in Jodhpur for partner Vladimir Doronin 's 50th birthday. The article included criticisms from animal-welfare activists, furious over the way fictional elephants were to be treated in the made-up event.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2012
MIAMI DOLPHINS receiver Chad Johnson was arrested Saturday night, accused of head-butting his newlywed wife, reality-TV star Evelyn Lozada, during an argument in front of their home outside Miami. Evelyn, who appears on "Basketball Wives" even though she's married to a footballer because she once was engaged to a hoopster, is thinking of changing her name to OUCHocinco. Chad and Evelyn were at dinner and she confronted him about a receipt she had found for a box of condoms, said Davie, Fla., police Capt.
NEWS
April 23, 2012 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer
Steak-umm, a national brand of thinly-sliced frozen steak, has lost its trademark infringement fight against local restaurant chain Steak 'Em Up in a David and Goliath battle of the steak world that's played out over the last three years in federal court. In 2009, Steak-umm filed the suit against Michael Lane, owner of Steak 'Em Up, which has locations in South Philly, Old City, Collingdale and Ridley Park. Steak-umm claimed that the name of Lane's store was trying to capitalize off Steak-umm's national brand and that it would confuse consumers.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The Navajo Nation has filed a federal lawsuit against Urban Outfitters Inc., alleging that the Philadelphia-based retailer committed trademark infringement by marketing and selling products that use the American Indian tribe's marks and names without a licensing or vendor agreement. In the civil action filed in U.S. District Court in New Mexico, the tribe and its commercial subsidiaries seek damages and an order stopping Urban Outfitters from using the names   "Navajo   " and   "Navaho " and marks on goods that compete with its own trademarked jewelry, housewares, and clothing.
NEWS
March 27, 2009 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The term restaurant week again has led to boiling tempers. The South Jersey Independent Restaurant Association, a business group also known as SJ Hot Chefs, sued two restaurateurs in U.S. District Court in Camden, claiming trademark infringement and unfair competition because their restaurant-week promotions are confusingly similar to the Hot Chefs' own week. The group asked Judge Joseph E. Irenas to put an end to the restaurant weeks advertised by Nunzio Patruno of Nunzio's Ristorante Rustico in Collingswood and Joe Palombo of Mirabella Cafe in Cherry Hill, neither of whom paid to be part of the promotion.
NEWS
October 19, 2006 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here's a lawsuit with some meat to it. Pat's King of Steaks, the South Philadelphia sandwich emporium, has taken its beef with Rick's Original Steaks to U.S. District Court. In a filing Monday, Pat's alleges trademark infringement, trademark dilution and unfair competition. It contends Rick's is confusing people by unfairly using its trademarks "Pat's Steaks," "Pat's King of Steaks," and crown logo at Rick's Reading Terminal Market and Citizens Bank Park operations. The suit, seeking unspecified damages, mentions the May 23 interview of Rick's Steaks owner Rick Olivieri on NBC's Today, in which Pat's was referenced.
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