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Traditional Music

NEWS
August 7, 1994 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / CHARLES FOX
Fairmount Park took on a Native American air yesterday as the 20th annual Powwow of the United American Indians of the Delaware Valley began with traditional music, crafts and food. The powwow continues this afternoon at Memorial Grove, Belmont Avenue and Belmont Mansion Drive.
NEWS
December 16, 1993 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It may not be like making holiday cookies or trimming the tree, but it is a Christmas tradition. For the last four years, recording artist Kenny Rogers has brought his Christmas show to Valley Forge Music Fair. Tonight is the last of a five-show stint at the theater-in-the-round. On Sunday, Rogers joked with the audience, he crooned, and he even handed out money. His show mixed music and shtick for an evening of entertainment and comedy. "How you see Kenny on stage is his personality when he's backstage as well," said Jackie Nepa, 34, of New Castle, Del., a fan club member who has met the singer more than once.
NEWS
November 18, 1993 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's a form of music that reaches back 5,000 years. It was the subject in the 1920s of the first big "talkie," The Jazz Singer, starring Al Jolson. It is the art of the Jewish cantor, and a presentation of that art is planned for Saturday night at Congregation Beth Or in Spring House. "A Marriage of Cantors" will showcase the singing talents of a husband and wife team - tenor Paul Offenkrantz, who serves as cantor for Beth Or, and soprano Karen Braunstein. "The role of the cantor," Offenkrantz said in a recent interview, "is as the leader of prayer for the Jewish people, through the vehicle of music.
NEWS
October 12, 1993 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mixed among the Mozart and Brahms in tomorrow's debut concert by Contrasts: Chamber Artists of Philadelphia will be works by Amram and Baker. Amram and Baker? Their names may not stir the echoes of some familiar opus in the ears of the listening public, but their music is part of a rich body of nontraditional classical music that remains underplayed, says Upper Darby violinist Diane Monroe, a co-founder of the group. That is why Contrasts has chosen to perform the work of David Amram and David Baker, among others, in the four-part concert series that will begin at the Montgomery County Community College at 8 p.m., Monroe said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1992 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you really get down to it, one of the major reasons Los Munequitos de Matanzas is here is to help reunite the African diaspora. That's not its stated purpose, of course. Nor would this Cuban folklore group, which has taken pains to avoid politics on its first trip to the United States, seem a likely agent for such an ambitious undertaking. But when you see the reaction Los Munequitos gets when it performs the music and dance of Cuba's Matanzas region - as it will tonight and tomorrow at two locations in West Philadelphia - you start to believe that this goal is, indeed, possible.
NEWS
March 1, 1992 | By Michael Lear-Olimpi, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The music and dance of two very different parts of the world - South America and Ireland - can be heard March 14 at the Appel Farm Arts & Music Center in Elmer. At 11 a.m., music and dance of the South American highlands will be performed by Ecuadoran musician Pepe Santana and the Inkhay (pronounced INK- eye) music and dance group. Members hail from Bolivia, Peru, Colombia, Chile, Argentina and Ecuador. "They will perform traditional music from the Andes on traditional instruments, stringed and wind," said Sean Timmons, Appel Farm artistic director.
NEWS
July 14, 1991 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
The inn at the sign of the Turk's Head was a landmark in West Chester since 1768. Throughout the years, the inn passed through a number of landowners and served many customers, including Washington and Lafayette. And to honor the rich tradition of hospitality and fun, the ninth annual Turk's Head Music Festival will bring a full program of music for residents of the county to enjoy at Everhart Park. "The inn was on the site of (what now is) the First National Bank in West Chester at Market and High Streets," explained Kathy McBratnie the recreation director for the West Chester Recreation Department, which is sponsoring the event.
NEWS
April 7, 1991 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
The Circlewood Coffee House will continue its series of folk-music performances with an April 19 concert of Irish music by the Wood's Tea Company, starting at 8 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of the Unitarian Church of Cherry Hill on 401 N. Kings Highway. The Coffee House is "going on its second year" of presenting folk-music shows, said Laurie McCarthy Bates, who does publicity for the all-volunteer group. "We're not trying to make a profit," although group members wouldn't mind if they did, Bates said.
NEWS
November 16, 1990 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
One date on the Waterboys' concert itinerary looks particularly interesting: New Year's Eve in County Galway, Ireland. Not only is it where Mike Scott, the band's singer-songwriter, lives with his new Irish bride, it's the region whose musical traditions have been the Waterboys' most recent inspiration. When the group was recording its new Room to Roam (Chrysalis) at Scott's studio in Spiddal, a good place to catch them blowing off steam would have been Hughes' Bar. "It's got a stone floor," says the Scottish expatriate, "an open fire and a barman who takes the mickey out of you a bit. Traditional music two or three nights a week.
NEWS
October 20, 1990 | By Kevin L. Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
When people come from a culture thousands of years old, they usually have developed many ways of making music. Los Kjarkas, a Bolivian folk group that performed last night at International House, can boast such a culture. Their music is rooted in the Quechua and Aymara Indian cultures, both of which predate the coming of the Spanish by millennia. They made music from the shell of an armadillo, from the skin of a calf, on bamboo pipes as big as a small child. They performed original compositions, based on traditional music forms, with the help of a foot-long seed pod, which provided rhythm.
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