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Traditional Values

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 30, 1996 | By Walter E. Williams
Nationwide, illegitimacy stands at 31 percent and growing. At its current growth rate, we risk becoming a nation of bastards well before the end of the next century. Today's illegitimacy is new. In 1940, the illegitimacy rate was 3.5 percent. How do we explain this? If we believed the preachments of former Surgeon General Joycelyn Elders, in 1940 there must have been greater high school condom distribution and more birth control clinics as well as more sex education classes and more abortions.
NEWS
November 11, 2000
What are the values [for the Digital Age]? For me, they are best expressed in a modern idea of community. At the heart of it is the belief in equal worth, which is the central belief that drives my politics - and in our mutual responsibility in creating a society that advances such equal worth. Note: it is equal worth, not equality of income or outcome; or simply equality of opportunity. It affirms our equal right to dignity, liberty and economic opportunity, as well as freedom from discrimination.
NEWS
December 30, 1991 | BY CAL THOMAS
The Republican Party in general and the Bush Administration in particular may be about to dance again with the issues that have brought them victory in every presidential election except one since 1968. President Bush began the rediscovery of the political benefits of traditional values or "social issues" a few days ago when he inveighed against "filth" on television (referring to the graphic testimony during the William Kennedy Smith rape trial) and the condom giveaway in some public schools.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | BY CAL THOMAS
There are those who like to label decades, and people have been wondering what to call the 1990s. Good Housekeeping magazine editors have decided they want the next 10 years to be known as the "Decency Decade. " However, the magazine also has been trying to sell a very interesting label of its own: "New Traditionalist. " The magazine has an ad campaign featuring pictures of "new traditionalist" women and their daughters. There are no husbands or fathers in these pictures. The magazine's editor, John Mack Carter, tells me this was a marketing decision designed to reflect the readers of the magazine and not a surrender to the single-parent household as the societal norm.
NEWS
October 16, 1986
I am appalled at the shoddy journalism presented in the Sept. 21 editorial "Robertson's stormy weather. " Raising fears such as persecution, inquisition, feud, suspicion and pogrom with no substance whatsoever, other than the man's being a truly dedicated Christian, is an insult to any intelligent reader. The author who accuses Pat Robertson of having things backward is the one who has things backward. Our country was founded by men who acknowledged God almighty as sovereign above all else.
NEWS
January 1, 1987 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Rabbi Abraham Shemtov recently met with President Reagan in the Oval Office, he thought he was at the end of the road. "They say, 'The buck stops here,' " Rabbi Shemtov said. "We went beyond that. " Rabbi Shemtov, along with nine other regional representatives of the Lubavitch movement of Orthodox Judaism, met with Reagan on Dec. 22 to set the stage for celebrating Hanukah, the Jewish Festival of Lights. They presented Reagan a menorah, or candelabrum. And Rabbi Shemtov, who represented Pennsylvania and South Jersey, said the President displayed the menorah not on his desk - where the buck usually stops - but behind his desk, among pictures of the first family.
NEWS
August 16, 2006
RONNIE Polaneczky weighed in on the city's side in the latest controversy concerning the Boy Scouts ("Boy Scouts in a jam," Aug. 2). I'm waiting for the day when a DN columnist does something really rad and stands up for traditional values (the horror!) and the Boy Scouts (shudder). But I have a question on Ms. Polaneczky's statement that the city has embraced principle while "the Cradle" (meaning the local Boy Scout council) cannot. In the land of political correctness, does an embrace of principle only count as such when one supports an item on the left's agenda (in this case, acceptance of homosexual scout leaders)
NEWS
August 27, 1986
Congratulations to Dorothy Storck for her enlightening Aug. 17 column expounding on a timely, and timeless, issue - adultery via the media. Hollywood and television are both guilty of glamorizing, if not in fact subtly legitimizing the problem. Nothwithstanding the disturbing statistics of present-day infidelity, it is neither funny nor fashionable to cheat on one's spouse, on or off the camera. The media's depiction of this as an innocuous and frivolous social pastime is in itself immoral.
NEWS
March 13, 1996 | By Robert Zausner, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
OK, quick, identify this slogan: "A Memory That Lasts A Lifetime. " If you answered that it's the new Pennsylvania tourism slogan, the one that's part of a $1 million promotion, the one intended to evoke "traditional values," the one that's replacing "America Starts Here," you're wrong. That would be: "Pennsylvania Memories Last a Lifetime. " "A Memory That Lasts a Lifetime" belongs to another enterprise that wants to lure visitors. It was tripped over by a Democratic staffer here during a recent walk through the yellow pages.
NEWS
December 12, 1990 | BY CAL THOMAS
Jay Bias was a young black man shot to death by another black man in the Washington suburbs, an area where violent death has become a way of life. Bias' death probably would have been little noticed had he not been the brother of Len Bias, a University of Maryland basketball star and first-round draft pick for the Boston Celtics. Len Bias died four years ago of a cocaine overdose. Three thousand people turned out for Jay Bias' funeral. Jay's father and the politicians who attended called for tougher gun control laws.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 22, 2013
I ONCE KNEW a woman who was adamantly, stridently, proudly pro-choice. She and I met at our freshman orientation in 1979, which prompted a panicked phone call to my mother along the lines of, "Rescue me from this place!" Over the years, I followed the woman's progress as we eyed each other from opposite sides of the ideological barricade, connected only by a love of our shared alma mater. Then, through a friend of a friend, I learned that this classmate was living in Kentucky and had five kids, including one with special needs.
NEWS
September 14, 2012
A specter is haunting the affluent societies of the West. Across the rich countries, and across the political spectrum, there is an unstated but palpable longing for the 1950s. This '50s nostalgia takes different forms on the left and on the right. For progressives, the backward-looking wish is for the shared and growing prosperity that allowed unions to thrive and enforce a relatively egalitarian social contract. Back then, Democrats in the United States, and social and Christian democrats in Europe, created social insurance systems that were largely endorsed by conservatives.
NEWS
January 11, 2012 | By Christopher Paslay
The Archdiocese of Philadelphia is planning to close 49 schools, and thousands are feeling the pain. Michael Wetzel, a veteran English teacher at Monsignor Bonner and Archbishop Prendergast High Schools in Drexel Hill, told The Inquirer that the news of their closing was "tantamount to a death. " I sympathize with Wetzel. I graduated from Monsignor Bonner in 1990, and I understand his sense of loss. Students will be uprooted, and teachers will be out of jobs. Worse still is the end of a tradition - as well as the decline of the traditional values that once fueled Catholic education.
NEWS
October 1, 2010 | By CHRISTINE OLLEY, olleyc@phillynews.com 215-854-5184
Almost 10,000 people from the region are expected to travel to Washington tomorrow to help draw attention to the need for more jobs and better education. The "One Nation Working Together" rally will be held at the Lincoln Memorial from noon to 4 p.m. and will include members of the Philadelphia NAACP and Asociacion Puertoriquenos en Marcha (APM), a Philadelphia-based Latino health, human-service and community-development agency. The rally is described as nonpartisan but is expected to draw more than 400 mostly liberal organizations, including the NAACP, APM, labor unions and gay-rights groups.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2010
EAGLES wide receiver Jason Avant knows he's going to get teased in the locker room because of what you're about to read. After all, it's not often that you hear a professional football player talking up the importance of marriage and commitment. You all but expect a man in Avant's position to hang out in nightclubs enjoying some of the benefits that come with being a player in the National Football League. But instead of getting his party on, Avant is all about his young family and about encouraging his teammates and others to embrace the institution of marriage.
NEWS
April 27, 2010 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The newest investor in a local group seeking to win The Inquirer at auction is tough in business and generous in charity - and Philadelphia through and through. Raymond G. Perelman, 92, whose name adorns buildings on city institutions ranging from the Art Museum to the Kimmel Center, confirmed his involvement Monday. Perelman's son, the wealthy financier Ronald O. Perelman, owner of Revlon cosmetics and the former husband of movie star Ellen Barkin, also is investing. "Why don't you wait and see if we get it?"
NEWS
March 14, 2008 | By Kevin Ferris
If John Howard were running for president this year, he might be dubbed the anti-change candidate. Not that he thinks the world is standing still. The former Australian prime minister recognizes the challenges and turbulence of the times, but he's not suggesting some vacuous call to "change" as the answer. Instead, last week while accepting the Irving Kristol award from the American Enterprise Institute, he emphasized how important it is for nations - especially Western democracies - to hold fast to their values and ideas in an ever-changing world.
NEWS
February 8, 2008 | By Morley Winograd and Michael D. Hais
The scene at American University was electric: thousands of young people filling an arena to hear Massachusetts Sen. Edward M. Kennedy endorse Barack Obama for president and praise the Illinois senator's ability to inspire and move a new generation of Americans. It was the perfect setting for Obama, who has been focused on this new "millennial generation" from the start. Almost a year ago, in a speech to African American leaders in Selma, Ala., he underlined the differences between two different types of generations: the "Moses generation" that led the children of Israel out of slavery and the "Joshua generation" that established the kingdom of Israel.
NEWS
August 16, 2006
RONNIE Polaneczky weighed in on the city's side in the latest controversy concerning the Boy Scouts ("Boy Scouts in a jam," Aug. 2). I'm waiting for the day when a DN columnist does something really rad and stands up for traditional values (the horror!) and the Boy Scouts (shudder). But I have a question on Ms. Polaneczky's statement that the city has embraced principle while "the Cradle" (meaning the local Boy Scout council) cannot. In the land of political correctness, does an embrace of principle only count as such when one supports an item on the left's agenda (in this case, acceptance of homosexual scout leaders)
NEWS
June 10, 2003 | By Gerald McOscar
The modern world is divided into two camps: those living in reality and those living in fantasy, delusion and illusion, where truth is subjective, ethics situational, love conditional, and things are rarely what they appear to be. Detached from ageless wisdom, traditions and values, they wrap themselves in a comfortable materialism and expedient morality to ward off the perpetual uncertainty, distraction and despair they suffer but dare not admit....
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