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Traditions

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NEWS
December 7, 2005 | By Charles Curley
In December, traditions abound. But it seems like all the good ones are already taken and all the bad ones taste like instant oatmeal. They are so forced, transparent and neatly packaged it's as if they're in a little plastic bag - just waiting for water. My wife and I have tried to get some traditions going for the last 15 years, but traditions can't keep up with today's living. Before having kids, we bought our first tree in the pouring rain in a Kmart parking lot. As we watched the teenage boy fasten the $30 tree to the top of our Honda Accord, we agreed that this is where we would always buy our trees.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2006 | By Lisa Kraus FOR THE INQUIRER
If you're curious how contemporary dance looks when deeply rooted in African tradition, you'll want to see Kariamu Welsh's group. Welsh, a Temple University professor, is a revered teacher whose Umfundalai technique, a synthesis of pan-African movements with modern idioms, forms the basis for her choreography. Beginning a two-weekend run in especially fine form, Kariamu & Company: Traditions offered six new and older works, both group pieces and solos. The choreography is mutable.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1997 | By C. S'thembile West, FOR THE INQUIRER
A dancer threw rocks onto a small square of gold fabric during the opening moments of Ndimire Zuwa (Wait for Me Sun), a dance based on a Zimbabwe legend that daylight could be prolonged if stones were placed in the fork of a tree. Then eight dancers, all dressed in orange, yellow, purple, and red, became a kaleidoscope of colors as they high-stepped into rhythmic patterns Saturday night at Temple University's Conwell Dance Theater, at the annual program by Kariamu & Company, which continues this weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1992 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In 1947, Gregory Peck posed as a Jew, exposing rampant anti-Semitism among New England swells in Elia Kazan's Oscar-winning Gentleman's Agreement. In 1992, Brendan Fraser is a Jew, exposed to the insidious anti-Semitism of an ivy-covered New England prep school, in director Robert Mandel's School Ties. (The two characters even share the same last name, Greene, although Peck's was spelled without the final e.) A sensitive, earnest examination of ethnic prejudice and the cultural traditions that feed it, School Ties - from a script by Dick Wolf and Darryl Ponicsan - walks the fine line between drama and "message movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1986 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
The most recent Bonnie Raitt album, a rocking affair called Green Light, was released in 1982. The great singer-guitarist recorded a follow-up (titled Tongue in Groove) for release in '84, but it wasn't, and Raitt was - from her contract with Warner Bros. Records. Thankfully, the absence of recorded music from this gifted singer- songwriter has not meant the absence of Raitt herself. In fact, in 1985 she was eminently visible: performing at the first Newport Folk Festival in 16 summers, sharing the stage with a host of rock and country notables at the Farm Aid benefit in September (singing a riveting solo set and backing up John Cougar Mellencamp)
NEWS
November 23, 1989 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
It is my turn now: My aunt, the keeper of Thanksgiving, has passed the baton, or should I say the drumstick. She has declared this a permanent legacy. Soon, according to plan, my grandmother's dishes will be delivered by cousin-courier to my dining room. So will the extra chairs and the communal chafing dishes. The tradition will also be transplanted. But this morning, she has come over to personally deliver a piece of this inheritance. She is making stuffing with me. In one hand, she carries the family Thanksgiving "bible," a small blue book that bears witness to the recipes and shopping lists and seating plans of decades past.
SPORTS
April 4, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
It took John Jacobs, Isao Aoki, J.C. Snead and Gil Morgan a while to shake off the record-breaking chill in the air yesterday during the first round of the Tradition in Scottsdale, Ariz. When they did, they heated up the year's first Senior major. All were 1-under-par at the turn, and each birdied five of the last nine holes to finish at 6-under-par 66. Simon Hobday, with a later start, took a different route - he was 7-under by the 10th hole, then lost ground and had to birdie No. 18 for his 66 and a share of the five-way tie for the lead.
NEWS
September 18, 1988 | By Barbara E. Sorid, Special to The Inquirer
While greeting club members at the door, George Suleta, 76, reflected upon the old days when "baby sitters were unheard of" and children accompanied their parents nearly everywhere. The old days were Camden in the 1920s and what Suleta had in mind was a Slavic social club organized by his father for Yugoslavs newly arrived in the United States. Today, Suleta presides over a similar organization, the Jadran (pronounced Yah-dran) Social Club in Hainesport, and he said the young and old members coming through the door were there for the same reason - to celebrate their ethnic traditions.
NEWS
May 16, 1999 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In many ways, Thomas and Carolyn Swett are typical homeowners. Twenty years ago, they moved to the township and purchased an old dairy farm, complete with a tumbling-down milk-house ruin. But the "jungle" has been transformed, Carolyn Swett said. The couple's property, just outside Unionville, is now a private oasis filled with flower beds and rock gardens. And that urge to transform - converting an old barn foundation into a swimming pool or building an addition - is evident each year during the annual Bayard Taylor Memorial Library Home and Garden Day Tour.
NEWS
May 23, 2005 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
The area between the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Kelly Drive has had many visitors of late, drawn by the Dal? exhibit and regatta season. High on Fairmount Park's Lemon Hill, across from Boathouse Row, stood a different set of newcomers Friday night: traveling tents that opened to reveal conceptualist/composer Peter Buffett's multimedia production Spirit - The Seventh Fire. Like a Native American version of Philip Glass' dance/performance opera 1,000 Airplanes on the Roof, Spirit presents an allegorical peek at one man's American Dream turned deeply inward to consider heritage: his own and that of his nation, its inner life, struggles and success.
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NEWS
September 9, 2016 | By Elizabeth Wellington, FASHION WRITER
As part of New York Fashion Week, which kicks off this morning, plus-size super model and Sports Illustrated swimsuit alum Ashley Graham will debut an eponymous collection of ready-to-wear lingerie. The runway, produced by New York production company Style360 and underwritten by South Korean car maker Kia Motors, promises to be star-studded: Kylie Jenner will be there, as will 19-year-old model Jordyn Woods. "Who would think a size-16 model would have an event this big, with so many confirmed celebrities?"
NEWS
September 6, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
Five years in, what is the Budweiser Made in America festival? A first-class hip-hop fest, for starters, that usually lands a big-name rock headliner - this year's catch being Coldplay, the British pop superstars who closed down the event Sunday - and has less success bringing in midlevel rock acts. It's a winning business proposition for festival curator Jay Z and his various enterprises, from his Roc Nation management company to the Tidal music service that live streamed the event all weekend.
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Zoë Miller, Staff Writer
On Thursday, hundreds of tots (and other youngsters up to age 10) will promenade down the Ocean City Boardwalk in the family resort's 107th annual baby parade. Some will walk. Others will ride in style in fanciful strollers, go-carts, and wagons. All will delight onlookers. The tradition dates back to 1909, when photoengraver Leo Bamberger - who helped organize Labor Day - founded the event. According to Michael J. Hartman, Ocean City's special events coordinator and artistic director of the Greater Ocean City Theatre Company, in the golden age of the parade, attendees treated the festivities like a night on the town, dressing up in glamorous attire.
FOOD
July 4, 2016
Busch's seafood restaurant died a dozen near-deaths before the end actually came. So when it was finally sold in 2014 and the Townsend's Inlet icon slipped beneath the waves of history - after 132 years and five generations of family ownership - no one was surprised. It was a 425-seat whale to maintain, decidedly frumpy in look, and seriously out of fashion on the plates. Even so, I still miss it. From the rich she-crab soup to the deviled clams, perfectly broiled lobster, and juicy blueberry cobbler, Busch's produced the timeless flavors of a Shore seafood house with consistency and character that's hard to match.
NEWS
June 13, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
At the end of a store-lined breezeway, a few doors down from a comic-book shop, rabbinical student Sandra Lawson prepares to shake up Shabbat. She lights the candles and opens the prayer book for the Friday night service, surrounded not by stained-glass windows and majestic interiors, but by shelves of vitamins and wheatgrass juice at Arnold's Way cafe in Lansdale, a Montgomery County hub of all things vegan and raw - and, on this evening, Jewish....
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
Man vs. Pole. If the scene Saturday at the South Ninth Street Italian Market Festival were a reality show, that would be the fitting title. The 30-foot grease pole, back from a 19-year hiatus, cut an imposing - and rather slippery - figure. Slathered in 16 pounds of lard, it won the crowd over early. But that didn't deter "Team Cannuli" of Cannuli's House of Pork. Leader Charlie Cannuli, 28, got pals Ricky Jacobs, 27, Mike Mastero, 27, and Luke Lindsey, 27, still wearing their aprons from selling pork sandwiches, to be the first team to take on the formidable column.
SPORTS
May 20, 2016 | By Chris Melchiorre, For The Inquirer
There was a period before high school when Quinn Nicolai briefly considered giving up lacrosse. She wanted to play softball. Looking back, it was almost like an out-of-body experience - as if she forgot, for a moment, what town she lived in. "My parents couldn't believe it," said Nicolai, a junior midfielder on the Moorestown girls' lacrosse team who, before this season, was chosen to wear the Quakers' storied No. 51 jersey. "They were just like, 'There's no way we're going to watch you play softball.' " Nicolai's neighbor and best friend - the girl who lives right around the corner from her - is Marie McCool.
FOOD
May 13, 2016 | By Drew Lazor, For The Inquirer
Joe Cicala's meat is ahead of schedule. But that doesn't mean it'll be eaten anytime soon. "This is perfect," says the chef, grinning as he gently thumbs a butcher-twined hunk of pork the size and shape of a beehive. We're standing close in a stuffy, funky-smelling curing room, an industrial walk-in where a few dozen culatellos, cut from the rear leg of the pig, dangle on metal S-hooks. Cicala pulls out a leather sheath housing his ago di osso di cavallo , a bone chisel carved from the femur of a horse that could pass for a weapon on Game of Thrones . Drawing the insanely sharp tool and wielding it like a dagger, he plunges the business end into the flesh of a few hanging specimens, sniffing it on the way out. An off-putting odor would indicate curing has gone awry, he explains.
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Staff Writer
Has Philadelphia's famous "councilmanic prerogative" been used in Point Breeze to encourage construction of affordable housing, or to punish a political foe? That was the question a federal jury had to grapple with Tuesday in the first day of trial for a lawsuit developer Ori Feibush filed against City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson. Feibush, who lost the 2015 Democratic primary election for the Second District to Johnson, said his projects had been repeatedly stymied and opposed by Johnson and his staff.
SPORTS
April 17, 2016 | By Marc Narducci, Columnist
Sometimes there are different ways to get things done. But make no mistake, when it comes to the Bishop Eustace baseball team, the results are usually favorable. This has long been one of the best programs in South Jersey, but this year, veteran coach Sam Tropiano lacked an abundance of what has carried the program over the years - seniors. This year, there are only six seniors on the roster, and one of them, infielder-outfielder Kevin Lammers, is out for the year with a back injury.
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