CollectionsTraditions
IN THE NEWS

Traditions

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 7, 2005 | By Charles Curley
In December, traditions abound. But it seems like all the good ones are already taken and all the bad ones taste like instant oatmeal. They are so forced, transparent and neatly packaged it's as if they're in a little plastic bag - just waiting for water. My wife and I have tried to get some traditions going for the last 15 years, but traditions can't keep up with today's living. Before having kids, we bought our first tree in the pouring rain in a Kmart parking lot. As we watched the teenage boy fasten the $30 tree to the top of our Honda Accord, we agreed that this is where we would always buy our trees.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2006 | By Lisa Kraus FOR THE INQUIRER
If you're curious how contemporary dance looks when deeply rooted in African tradition, you'll want to see Kariamu Welsh's group. Welsh, a Temple University professor, is a revered teacher whose Umfundalai technique, a synthesis of pan-African movements with modern idioms, forms the basis for her choreography. Beginning a two-weekend run in especially fine form, Kariamu & Company: Traditions offered six new and older works, both group pieces and solos. The choreography is mutable.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1997 | By C. S'thembile West, FOR THE INQUIRER
A dancer threw rocks onto a small square of gold fabric during the opening moments of Ndimire Zuwa (Wait for Me Sun), a dance based on a Zimbabwe legend that daylight could be prolonged if stones were placed in the fork of a tree. Then eight dancers, all dressed in orange, yellow, purple, and red, became a kaleidoscope of colors as they high-stepped into rhythmic patterns Saturday night at Temple University's Conwell Dance Theater, at the annual program by Kariamu & Company, which continues this weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1992 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In 1947, Gregory Peck posed as a Jew, exposing rampant anti-Semitism among New England swells in Elia Kazan's Oscar-winning Gentleman's Agreement. In 1992, Brendan Fraser is a Jew, exposed to the insidious anti-Semitism of an ivy-covered New England prep school, in director Robert Mandel's School Ties. (The two characters even share the same last name, Greene, although Peck's was spelled without the final e.) A sensitive, earnest examination of ethnic prejudice and the cultural traditions that feed it, School Ties - from a script by Dick Wolf and Darryl Ponicsan - walks the fine line between drama and "message movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1986 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
The most recent Bonnie Raitt album, a rocking affair called Green Light, was released in 1982. The great singer-guitarist recorded a follow-up (titled Tongue in Groove) for release in '84, but it wasn't, and Raitt was - from her contract with Warner Bros. Records. Thankfully, the absence of recorded music from this gifted singer- songwriter has not meant the absence of Raitt herself. In fact, in 1985 she was eminently visible: performing at the first Newport Folk Festival in 16 summers, sharing the stage with a host of rock and country notables at the Farm Aid benefit in September (singing a riveting solo set and backing up John Cougar Mellencamp)
NEWS
November 23, 1989 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
It is my turn now: My aunt, the keeper of Thanksgiving, has passed the baton, or should I say the drumstick. She has declared this a permanent legacy. Soon, according to plan, my grandmother's dishes will be delivered by cousin-courier to my dining room. So will the extra chairs and the communal chafing dishes. The tradition will also be transplanted. But this morning, she has come over to personally deliver a piece of this inheritance. She is making stuffing with me. In one hand, she carries the family Thanksgiving "bible," a small blue book that bears witness to the recipes and shopping lists and seating plans of decades past.
SPORTS
April 4, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
It took John Jacobs, Isao Aoki, J.C. Snead and Gil Morgan a while to shake off the record-breaking chill in the air yesterday during the first round of the Tradition in Scottsdale, Ariz. When they did, they heated up the year's first Senior major. All were 1-under-par at the turn, and each birdied five of the last nine holes to finish at 6-under-par 66. Simon Hobday, with a later start, took a different route - he was 7-under by the 10th hole, then lost ground and had to birdie No. 18 for his 66 and a share of the five-way tie for the lead.
NEWS
September 18, 1988 | By Barbara E. Sorid, Special to The Inquirer
While greeting club members at the door, George Suleta, 76, reflected upon the old days when "baby sitters were unheard of" and children accompanied their parents nearly everywhere. The old days were Camden in the 1920s and what Suleta had in mind was a Slavic social club organized by his father for Yugoslavs newly arrived in the United States. Today, Suleta presides over a similar organization, the Jadran (pronounced Yah-dran) Social Club in Hainesport, and he said the young and old members coming through the door were there for the same reason - to celebrate their ethnic traditions.
NEWS
May 16, 1999 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In many ways, Thomas and Carolyn Swett are typical homeowners. Twenty years ago, they moved to the township and purchased an old dairy farm, complete with a tumbling-down milk-house ruin. But the "jungle" has been transformed, Carolyn Swett said. The couple's property, just outside Unionville, is now a private oasis filled with flower beds and rock gardens. And that urge to transform - converting an old barn foundation into a swimming pool or building an addition - is evident each year during the annual Bayard Taylor Memorial Library Home and Garden Day Tour.
NEWS
May 23, 2005 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
The area between the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Kelly Drive has had many visitors of late, drawn by the Dal? exhibit and regatta season. High on Fairmount Park's Lemon Hill, across from Boathouse Row, stood a different set of newcomers Friday night: traveling tents that opened to reveal conceptualist/composer Peter Buffett's multimedia production Spirit - The Seventh Fire. Like a Native American version of Philip Glass' dance/performance opera 1,000 Airplanes on the Roof, Spirit presents an allegorical peek at one man's American Dream turned deeply inward to consider heritage: his own and that of his nation, its inner life, struggles and success.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
April 17, 2016 | By Marc Narducci, Columnist
Sometimes there are different ways to get things done. But make no mistake, when it comes to the Bishop Eustace baseball team, the results are usually favorable. This has long been one of the best programs in South Jersey, but this year, veteran coach Sam Tropiano lacked an abundance of what has carried the program over the years - seniors. This year, there are only six seniors on the roster, and one of them, infielder-outfielder Kevin Lammers, is out for the year with a back injury.
SPORTS
April 15, 2016 | By Chris Melchiorre, For The Inquirer
Clearview's Collin Love still keeps in touch with many of the great players who came before him. Just last week, he was on FaceTime with former teammate Matt Donnelly, the 2015 Inquirer player of the year, who now plays midfield for Penn State. "I look up to anybody who I see is playing lacrosse at a high level," Love said. "Anyone who has put in the work and has that kind of talent, that kind of appreciation for the game, I look up to them. "And I make sure I'm always striving to get to that level myself.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
When the black, $128.95 Vince Camuto summer sandals size 6, with a 2-inch cork heel turned out to be too big, Sherri Theodore decided to return them to Nordstrom's online, where she had bought them a few weeks before. "They just weren't right for me," said Theodore, 61, a retired bookkeeper from Ardmore. She reboxed the shoes and drove to the nearby Bala Cynwyd Shopping Center to mail them back at a UPS store there. Where do rejected items bought online or at a brick-and-mortar store end up when returned?
NEWS
April 8, 2016
THE DAILY NEWS is right to point out that the School District's new charter school profiles ("Keeping up with Charter Schools," April 4) will help parents by providing basic school information in one easily accessible place. Philadelphia Charters for Excellence is a strong supporter of accountability for all public schools, traditional and charter, and we hope this is the start of an era in which parents are given the chance to see the entire playing field before making high-stakes decisions about their children's future.
SPORTS
April 5, 2016
"Jose Fernandez will strike you out and stare you down into the dugout and pump his fist. And if you hit a homer and pimp it? He doesn't care. Because you got him. That's part of the game. " - Bryce Harper "Bautista is a f-ing disgrace to the game. . . . He's embarrassing to all the Latin players, whoever played before him. Throwing his bat and acting like a fool. " - Goose Gossage "All things are subject to interpretation. Whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Chestnut Hill does not do change  easily. Several years ago, when a Germantown Avenue toy store dared to paint its old-timey facade in rainbow colors, it seemed like the keening could be heard all the way to Center City. The neighborhood once put a stop to a proposed Exxon gas station by appealing directly to major shareholders living in Chestnut Hill. (Yes, shareholders, plural.) "Development" has always been something that happens to other Philadelphia neighborhoods. So imagine the consternation when in 2011 a local developer proposed a mid-rise condo building in the middle of the shopping district on Germantown Avenue.
NEWS
March 4, 2016 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
It's a study in community theater. On the stage of Temple Adath Israel's auditorium in Merion Station, several actors are going through their paces. Others wait for their scenes to be called, and a rolling rack of costumes is making the rounds. Prompters toss out lines as needed. It's a Sunday afternoon rehearsal for Guys and Dolls . Lisa Litman looks on. She's the director. She also plays Adelaide, the female lead in the show, which won the Tony for best musical when it debuted on Broadway in 1950, with songs like "A Bushel and a Peck," "If I Were a Bell," and "Sit Down, You're Rockin' the Boat.
NEWS
February 4, 2016
The line formed before dawn. The revelers wore Hawaiian shirts and top hats. They had come from near and far this mild winter's morning to the Grey Lodge Pub in Northeast Philly, driven by a shared devotion to a weather-prognosticating marmot. And to drinking really strong beer for breakfast. And to maybe even doing the limbo. Welcome to Philly's arguably most spirited - and possibly only - Groundhog Day celebration. For 14 years, the Grey Lodge has hosted a Groundhog Day bash defined by great company, flowing beer, and lots of activities that, well, do not find their roots in the 130-year-old tradition.
NEWS
January 28, 2016 | JERRY T. JORDAN
ONE OF the reasons I fight so hard for traditional public schools is simply that I believe in what they can be. I believe in their potential, just like I believe in the potential of every single student that walks through the doors each morning. And why do I believe? It's personal: I'm a proud graduate of Philadelphia's neighborhood schools. As an African-American male and a lifelong Philadelphia resident, my success was not because I "picked myself up by my bootstraps. " My schools were places of learning.
NEWS
January 24, 2016
Yannick Nézet-Séguin's fifth season as Philadelphia Orchestra music director might not immediately look that different from the previous four. In some ways, that's intentional. Nézet-Séguin has often talked about the advantage in creating a familylike circle of performers - such as Karen Cargill, who was memorably featured in this season's Messiah and who will be back in May 2017 for the Mahler Symphony No. 3 . Certain composers don't stay away long: Now that Nézet-Séguin has conducted all of Rachmaninoff's symphonies, guest conductor Stéphane Denève will cover the composer's piano/orchestral works over three separate concerts April 27-29, 2017.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|