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Traditions

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NEWS
December 7, 2005 | By Charles Curley
In December, traditions abound. But it seems like all the good ones are already taken and all the bad ones taste like instant oatmeal. They are so forced, transparent and neatly packaged it's as if they're in a little plastic bag - just waiting for water. My wife and I have tried to get some traditions going for the last 15 years, but traditions can't keep up with today's living. Before having kids, we bought our first tree in the pouring rain in a Kmart parking lot. As we watched the teenage boy fasten the $30 tree to the top of our Honda Accord, we agreed that this is where we would always buy our trees.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2006 | By Lisa Kraus FOR THE INQUIRER
If you're curious how contemporary dance looks when deeply rooted in African tradition, you'll want to see Kariamu Welsh's group. Welsh, a Temple University professor, is a revered teacher whose Umfundalai technique, a synthesis of pan-African movements with modern idioms, forms the basis for her choreography. Beginning a two-weekend run in especially fine form, Kariamu & Company: Traditions offered six new and older works, both group pieces and solos. The choreography is mutable.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1997 | By C. S'thembile West, FOR THE INQUIRER
A dancer threw rocks onto a small square of gold fabric during the opening moments of Ndimire Zuwa (Wait for Me Sun), a dance based on a Zimbabwe legend that daylight could be prolonged if stones were placed in the fork of a tree. Then eight dancers, all dressed in orange, yellow, purple, and red, became a kaleidoscope of colors as they high-stepped into rhythmic patterns Saturday night at Temple University's Conwell Dance Theater, at the annual program by Kariamu & Company, which continues this weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1992 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In 1947, Gregory Peck posed as a Jew, exposing rampant anti-Semitism among New England swells in Elia Kazan's Oscar-winning Gentleman's Agreement. In 1992, Brendan Fraser is a Jew, exposed to the insidious anti-Semitism of an ivy-covered New England prep school, in director Robert Mandel's School Ties. (The two characters even share the same last name, Greene, although Peck's was spelled without the final e.) A sensitive, earnest examination of ethnic prejudice and the cultural traditions that feed it, School Ties - from a script by Dick Wolf and Darryl Ponicsan - walks the fine line between drama and "message movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1986 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
The most recent Bonnie Raitt album, a rocking affair called Green Light, was released in 1982. The great singer-guitarist recorded a follow-up (titled Tongue in Groove) for release in '84, but it wasn't, and Raitt was - from her contract with Warner Bros. Records. Thankfully, the absence of recorded music from this gifted singer- songwriter has not meant the absence of Raitt herself. In fact, in 1985 she was eminently visible: performing at the first Newport Folk Festival in 16 summers, sharing the stage with a host of rock and country notables at the Farm Aid benefit in September (singing a riveting solo set and backing up John Cougar Mellencamp)
NEWS
November 23, 1989 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
It is my turn now: My aunt, the keeper of Thanksgiving, has passed the baton, or should I say the drumstick. She has declared this a permanent legacy. Soon, according to plan, my grandmother's dishes will be delivered by cousin-courier to my dining room. So will the extra chairs and the communal chafing dishes. The tradition will also be transplanted. But this morning, she has come over to personally deliver a piece of this inheritance. She is making stuffing with me. In one hand, she carries the family Thanksgiving "bible," a small blue book that bears witness to the recipes and shopping lists and seating plans of decades past.
SPORTS
April 4, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
It took John Jacobs, Isao Aoki, J.C. Snead and Gil Morgan a while to shake off the record-breaking chill in the air yesterday during the first round of the Tradition in Scottsdale, Ariz. When they did, they heated up the year's first Senior major. All were 1-under-par at the turn, and each birdied five of the last nine holes to finish at 6-under-par 66. Simon Hobday, with a later start, took a different route - he was 7-under by the 10th hole, then lost ground and had to birdie No. 18 for his 66 and a share of the five-way tie for the lead.
NEWS
September 18, 1988 | By Barbara E. Sorid, Special to The Inquirer
While greeting club members at the door, George Suleta, 76, reflected upon the old days when "baby sitters were unheard of" and children accompanied their parents nearly everywhere. The old days were Camden in the 1920s and what Suleta had in mind was a Slavic social club organized by his father for Yugoslavs newly arrived in the United States. Today, Suleta presides over a similar organization, the Jadran (pronounced Yah-dran) Social Club in Hainesport, and he said the young and old members coming through the door were there for the same reason - to celebrate their ethnic traditions.
NEWS
May 16, 1999 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In many ways, Thomas and Carolyn Swett are typical homeowners. Twenty years ago, they moved to the township and purchased an old dairy farm, complete with a tumbling-down milk-house ruin. But the "jungle" has been transformed, Carolyn Swett said. The couple's property, just outside Unionville, is now a private oasis filled with flower beds and rock gardens. And that urge to transform - converting an old barn foundation into a swimming pool or building an addition - is evident each year during the annual Bayard Taylor Memorial Library Home and Garden Day Tour.
NEWS
May 23, 2005 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
The area between the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Kelly Drive has had many visitors of late, drawn by the Dal? exhibit and regatta season. High on Fairmount Park's Lemon Hill, across from Boathouse Row, stood a different set of newcomers Friday night: traveling tents that opened to reveal conceptualist/composer Peter Buffett's multimedia production Spirit - The Seventh Fire. Like a Native American version of Philip Glass' dance/performance opera 1,000 Airplanes on the Roof, Spirit presents an allegorical peek at one man's American Dream turned deeply inward to consider heritage: his own and that of his nation, its inner life, struggles and success.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
August 9, 2015 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
Road races are still popular in the United States but experienced a slight contraction in 2014, according to a new survey put out by Running USA. The nonprofit, which promotes the sport, found that in 2014, U.S. road races had 18.75 million finishers. That's down 1 percent from 2013. The number of events is down 1 percent, too. "The race market is over-saturated and new runners aren't necessarily doing 'traditional' road races," said Scott Bush, director of communications for Running USA. Instead, those runners are "focusing more on experimental and immersive races like mud runs and obstacle runs, which don't necessarily count finishers.
NEWS
August 4, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
The quiet Red Lantern Tavern in Glenolden is no stranger to patrons from outside the one-square- mile borough: On a typical night, manager Bob Simone sees clientele trickle in from nearly every nearby Delaware County town. Some meet friends. Others stop by to chat with Simone. But a vast, distinctive group of customers - nearly 1 in 4, Simone estimates - flocks to his local watering hole because they have no other choice. They live in Sharon Hill, and they want a drink. For decades, Sharon Hill locals wanting to buy alcohol have been confronted with only two options: Buy a drink elsewhere or don't drink at all. Their borough is completely dry. No bars.
SPORTS
July 18, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penn State football coach James Franklin gathered former and current players Thursday morning for a special announcement: The players' names that had been stitched onto the backs of the Nittany Lions' blue-and-white jerseys since 2012 were coming off. Jerseys with no names revive one of Penn State's oldest traditions. "I've thought about this since day one but I just thought year one wasn't the right time to make the decision," the second-year coach said Thursday night. "There was a lot of issues, a lot of things we had to overcome.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEA ISLE CITY, N.J. - Call this summer drama 50 shades of yellow. And then gray. And back to yellow again. In this overpopulated beach town, the summer parking battles are being fought with cans of paint. And a parade of trips to Municipal Court. Hey, the accused are arguing, this is how it's always been done in Sea Isle: You paint the strip of the curb in front of your house yellow to make sure cars don't block your driveway, or maybe even you make it a little longer to save a space.
NEWS
July 6, 2015 | By Scott Sturgis, For The Inquirer
When Kristen Breslin faces an obstacle, she turns it into an opportunity - not the easy way out. Midway through the Great Recession, she could feel the end of the road for her job at an auto-parts store looming, and decided it was time to build a new skill set and move on. "I was like, 'You know what? No one is ever going to pay me to punch buttons on a computer,' " the Norristown woman recounted in her a matter-of-fact way. She'd been part of what many consider "a man's world" working at the parts counter; it took her some time to build rapport with her mechanic and gearhead customers.
REAL_ESTATE
June 29, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
There was a time, not very long ago, when the number of unsubsidized, market-rate residential construction projects within the Philadelphia city limits could be counted on one hand. Now, you need a scorecard to keep track, and even that list might need to be updated daily. Noah Ostroff, of Keller Williams Real Estate in Center City, said that, typically, when he gets a call from someone looking to buy a property in the city, it is for new construction. "I don't have many people looking for traditional - what we call 'homes with character,' " he said.
SPORTS
June 22, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Before the pair of renaissances that yielded the Phillies their only two World Series titles and salvaged some pride for a franchise paralyzed by humiliation, Bucks County-born author James Michener was asked how he endured the ups and downs of being a baseball fan. "Ups?" Michener replied. "What ups? I'm from Philadelphia. " The Philadelphia Michener knew as a boy was a robust industrial hub, a city frequently referred to as "The Nation's Workshop. " But by the time the prolific writer died in 1997, most of the factories that had cranked out everything from locomotives to hats were shuttered.
FOOD
June 12, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some recipes are sacrosanct, passed down on stained and creased index cards from one generation to the next. If you grew up on soul food, like Dejenaba Gordon did, collard greens is among them. "I've only known one way to cook collard greens: Boil it for hours with turkey or pork," she said. But last week, she stood up in front of a capacity crowd at the Free Library's Culinary Literacy Center and proposed something radical: Quickly saute the greens with caramelized onions, olive oil, and Dijon mustard, a compromise that preserves the nutrition and cuts out the saturated fat. The point wasn't to break with tradition, but to embrace it - while rethinking familiar flavors and ingredients in the context of 21st-century nutrition concerns.
SPORTS
June 7, 2015 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
People want lasting memories and they want to be present for the making of history or the long anticipated renewal of an interrupted tradition. The more than 100,000 who showed up at Belmont Park a year ago for the Belmont Stakes were not necessarily all fans of horse racing, but they came out because they didn't want to miss the promise of something very different. Well, they all got a memory, and they were all there for history, and it was definitely a different day. Those fans were on hand for the day the Long Island Rail Road melted down and the roadways along the border of Queens and Nassau County became solid pipelines clogged by steel and chrome.
NEWS
May 20, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
  Ardmore isn't New Orleans, and quiet Lancaster Avenue is surely not Bourbon Street. But on Sunday, there were some sweaty goings-on at Ardmore Music Hall with zydeco accordion king C.J. Chenier & the Red-Hot Louisiana Band and supporting act Philly Gumbo. In silver brocade and sparkly shoes, Chenier, son of zydeco god Clifton Chenier, walked onstage with the heritage of Louisiana Creole funk on his shoulders. Also on his shoulders was a Baldoni accordion as opulent as his outfit.
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