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Traditions

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NEWS
December 7, 2005 | By Charles Curley
In December, traditions abound. But it seems like all the good ones are already taken and all the bad ones taste like instant oatmeal. They are so forced, transparent and neatly packaged it's as if they're in a little plastic bag - just waiting for water. My wife and I have tried to get some traditions going for the last 15 years, but traditions can't keep up with today's living. Before having kids, we bought our first tree in the pouring rain in a Kmart parking lot. As we watched the teenage boy fasten the $30 tree to the top of our Honda Accord, we agreed that this is where we would always buy our trees.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2006 | By Lisa Kraus FOR THE INQUIRER
If you're curious how contemporary dance looks when deeply rooted in African tradition, you'll want to see Kariamu Welsh's group. Welsh, a Temple University professor, is a revered teacher whose Umfundalai technique, a synthesis of pan-African movements with modern idioms, forms the basis for her choreography. Beginning a two-weekend run in especially fine form, Kariamu & Company: Traditions offered six new and older works, both group pieces and solos. The choreography is mutable.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1997 | By C. S'thembile West, FOR THE INQUIRER
A dancer threw rocks onto a small square of gold fabric during the opening moments of Ndimire Zuwa (Wait for Me Sun), a dance based on a Zimbabwe legend that daylight could be prolonged if stones were placed in the fork of a tree. Then eight dancers, all dressed in orange, yellow, purple, and red, became a kaleidoscope of colors as they high-stepped into rhythmic patterns Saturday night at Temple University's Conwell Dance Theater, at the annual program by Kariamu & Company, which continues this weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1992 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In 1947, Gregory Peck posed as a Jew, exposing rampant anti-Semitism among New England swells in Elia Kazan's Oscar-winning Gentleman's Agreement. In 1992, Brendan Fraser is a Jew, exposed to the insidious anti-Semitism of an ivy-covered New England prep school, in director Robert Mandel's School Ties. (The two characters even share the same last name, Greene, although Peck's was spelled without the final e.) A sensitive, earnest examination of ethnic prejudice and the cultural traditions that feed it, School Ties - from a script by Dick Wolf and Darryl Ponicsan - walks the fine line between drama and "message movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1986 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
The most recent Bonnie Raitt album, a rocking affair called Green Light, was released in 1982. The great singer-guitarist recorded a follow-up (titled Tongue in Groove) for release in '84, but it wasn't, and Raitt was - from her contract with Warner Bros. Records. Thankfully, the absence of recorded music from this gifted singer- songwriter has not meant the absence of Raitt herself. In fact, in 1985 she was eminently visible: performing at the first Newport Folk Festival in 16 summers, sharing the stage with a host of rock and country notables at the Farm Aid benefit in September (singing a riveting solo set and backing up John Cougar Mellencamp)
NEWS
November 23, 1989 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
It is my turn now: My aunt, the keeper of Thanksgiving, has passed the baton, or should I say the drumstick. She has declared this a permanent legacy. Soon, according to plan, my grandmother's dishes will be delivered by cousin-courier to my dining room. So will the extra chairs and the communal chafing dishes. The tradition will also be transplanted. But this morning, she has come over to personally deliver a piece of this inheritance. She is making stuffing with me. In one hand, she carries the family Thanksgiving "bible," a small blue book that bears witness to the recipes and shopping lists and seating plans of decades past.
SPORTS
April 4, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
It took John Jacobs, Isao Aoki, J.C. Snead and Gil Morgan a while to shake off the record-breaking chill in the air yesterday during the first round of the Tradition in Scottsdale, Ariz. When they did, they heated up the year's first Senior major. All were 1-under-par at the turn, and each birdied five of the last nine holes to finish at 6-under-par 66. Simon Hobday, with a later start, took a different route - he was 7-under by the 10th hole, then lost ground and had to birdie No. 18 for his 66 and a share of the five-way tie for the lead.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Would you like to buy some longevity? How about some beauty, or maybe a bit of luck? Vendors hawked them Saturday in Chinatown in the form of pussy willow, gladiolus, and bamboo, respectively, at a flower market in preparation for Sunday's Lunar New Year. Asian American residents were readying their homes according to time-honored rituals, including buying the traditional flowers for themselves and friends. Other celebrations for the Chinese New Year, as it's known, have been around for a while - a midnight parade, lion dances, and a daytime festival.
NEWS
September 18, 1988 | By Barbara E. Sorid, Special to The Inquirer
While greeting club members at the door, George Suleta, 76, reflected upon the old days when "baby sitters were unheard of" and children accompanied their parents nearly everywhere. The old days were Camden in the 1920s and what Suleta had in mind was a Slavic social club organized by his father for Yugoslavs newly arrived in the United States. Today, Suleta presides over a similar organization, the Jadran (pronounced Yah-dran) Social Club in Hainesport, and he said the young and old members coming through the door were there for the same reason - to celebrate their ethnic traditions.
NEWS
May 16, 1999 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In many ways, Thomas and Carolyn Swett are typical homeowners. Twenty years ago, they moved to the township and purchased an old dairy farm, complete with a tumbling-down milk-house ruin. But the "jungle" has been transformed, Carolyn Swett said. The couple's property, just outside Unionville, is now a private oasis filled with flower beds and rock gardens. And that urge to transform - converting an old barn foundation into a swimming pool or building an addition - is evident each year during the annual Bayard Taylor Memorial Library Home and Garden Day Tour.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 4, 2016
The line formed before dawn. The revelers wore Hawaiian shirts and top hats. They had come from near and far this mild winter's morning to the Grey Lodge Pub in Northeast Philly, driven by a shared devotion to a weather-prognosticating marmot. And to drinking really strong beer for breakfast. And to maybe even doing the limbo. Welcome to Philly's arguably most spirited - and possibly only - Groundhog Day celebration. For 14 years, the Grey Lodge has hosted a Groundhog Day bash defined by great company, flowing beer, and lots of activities that, well, do not find their roots in the 130-year-old tradition.
NEWS
January 28, 2016 | JERRY T. JORDAN
ONE OF the reasons I fight so hard for traditional public schools is simply that I believe in what they can be. I believe in their potential, just like I believe in the potential of every single student that walks through the doors each morning. And why do I believe? It's personal: I'm a proud graduate of Philadelphia's neighborhood schools. As an African-American male and a lifelong Philadelphia resident, my success was not because I "picked myself up by my bootstraps. " My schools were places of learning.
NEWS
January 24, 2016
Yannick Nézet-Séguin's fifth season as Philadelphia Orchestra music director might not immediately look that different from the previous four. In some ways, that's intentional. Nézet-Séguin has often talked about the advantage in creating a familylike circle of performers - such as Karen Cargill, who was memorably featured in this season's Messiah and who will be back in May 2017 for the Mahler Symphony No. 3 . Certain composers don't stay away long: Now that Nézet-Séguin has conducted all of Rachmaninoff's symphonies, guest conductor Stéphane Denève will cover the composer's piano/orchestral works over three separate concerts April 27-29, 2017.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2016
The American middle class is disappearing, and with it, the mall anchor store. As he pushed a shopping cart at T.J. Maxx the day after Christmas, Ahmet Kula made it clear he likes nice things but isn't willing to pay full price for them. "I like the prices and quality in here," the 45-year-old limo driver from Levittown said. "I like Macy's, too. But it's too expensive. " Then he whipped out two Sears credit cards he said he hadn't used in months, for the same reason. Kula represents that middle-of-the-road shopper, neither low-end nor high-end, who in recent years has become elusive for shopping malls - and is the reason why Macy's, Sears, and J.C. Penney are shutting stores.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
At 46, Duane Eubanks isn't getting any younger. That's a good thing, according to the Philadelphia-born trumpeter and composer. Duane is the youngest of the jazz men in the Eubanks family (guitarist Kevin, trombonist Robin), but he no longer feels like the baby of the bunch. "I must admit that the birthdays feel like they're coming faster and faster, but I'm OK with that," says Eubanks. "From what I know, it beats the alternative. " Eubanks is speaking from his Philly digs in advance of his pre-birthday shows at Chris' Jazz Café on Saturday.
NEWS
December 21, 2015 | By Warren Brown, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON POST
Rapid technological progress, accompanied by the increasing standardization of what once was sold as costly optional equipment, is upsetting the notion of traditional automotive luxury. I've written this before - much to the chagrin of many in the car industry, particularly executives who cling to the eroding but still profitable idea that "luxury" is reserved for those truly wealthy enough to afford it, or aspirant buyers willing to incur enormous debt to acquire it. I am hereby restating my argument and offering as proof Exhibit A - the 2016 Kia Optima SX Limited sedan.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, STAFF MUSIC CRITIC
Until recent seasons, Bach cantatas were absent from mainstream Philadelphia concerts. That was remedied by regular installments from Choral Arts Philadelphia and, more periodically, by the Bach Gamut Ensemble headed by Koji Otsuki and shepherded along by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society. The latter presented an evening of solo cantatas on Wednesday at St. Mark's Church. But traditions take time to build; Gamut is maybe halfway toward establishing a convincing personality in this repertoire.
NEWS
November 26, 2015 | By Dani Blum, Inquirer Staff Writer
With traditional carols, hula hoops and the hum of a propane torch against ice, the Fairmount Park Conservancy started the holiday season Tuesday with Christmas-themed performances at Rittenhouse Square. The event officially kick-started the Historic Houses of Fairmount Park's annual festivities. The park's Historic Houses are rural mansions from the 18th and 19th centuries, now converted into public museums. The tradition of decorating the houses for the holidays goes back 44 years.
NEWS
November 23, 2015 | By Jack Tomczuk, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pat Ercole remembers when her great-uncle Joe would visit the family home in Broomall, and give her five brothers haircuts. And when Joe O'Flynn was done with the boys, he would cut the girls' hair. Pixie bowl cuts that always left her and her three sisters in tears, Ercole said. Nevertheless, Uncle Joe, who himself sported a considerable puff of white hair, was "the most jovial little leprechaun," she said. Uncle Joe, who never married, would invite his nieces and nephews to his house on 20th and Cherry Streets every Thanksgiving to watch the parade, said Ercole, a 58-year-old physical therapist from Media.
FOOD
October 30, 2015 | Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat. Craig LaBan: Is anyone else bummed over the bad words about bacon, corned beef, hot dogs, and other processed meats issued by the World Health Organization, which on Tuesday warned that eating them regularly can seriously increase your risk of colon and stomach cancer? OK . . . it's not exactly a news flash that we should be moderating our intake of fatty cured meats (and red meats, too, which also got a disapproving glance from the WHO)
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