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Traffic Congestion

NEWS
January 15, 1989 | By Charlotte Kidd, Special to The Inquirer
Betty Green, Willow Grove Chamber of Commerce executive director, said she was reading a newspaper article on an anticipated shift in federal funding from highway projects to plans geared to easing suburban traffic congestion when things became clear. She realized why the Montgomery-Bucks Transportation Management Association project - an effort she spearheaded months ago - was getting state and federal attention. Under the model program, employers, land developers, and county and municipal government officials could create their own solutions to traffic problems, she said.
NEWS
July 13, 1989 | By Joe Fite, Special to The Inquirer
Back in 1970, the traffic congestion in Montgomery Township where Horsham Road meets Routes 309 and 202 - Five Points - already was a problem. Township officials planned at that time to create a spur beginning on Horsham Road east of the Montgomeryville Mart, connecting with Montgomery Avenue, crossing Route 202 and finally joining with McLaughlin Road, which would empty traffic onto Route 309 north of Five Points. Nineteen years later, traffic congestion at Five Points is a nightmare.
NEWS
October 6, 1988 | By Douglas A. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Burlington County's planning staff, envisioning an explosion in traffic that could overwhelm the county's 497-mile highway system by the year 2010, yesterday gave freeholders a draft of a plan to keep the cars rolling. "The amount of development (in the county) is increasing so quickly that it's difficult for the transportation system to keep up with it," said the draft of the Burlington County Highway Master Plan, which will undergo public hearings before it is adopted. "Without any improvements, or planning for the future, these roads will become overloaded very quickly and have a negative effect on the economy and development of the county," the report said.
NEWS
March 12, 2008
Even though Philadelphia recently won national recognition as a walkable town, the city's downtown crosswalks may be truly safe only once a year: when dozens of police officers show up to direct traffic at intersections during the week-long Philadelphia Flower Show. With the flower show just passed, pedestrians face another year of crossing at their own risk. So it's welcome to see a new study of downtown traffic congestion make the compelling case for city officials to take a fresh, coordinated look at bringing more order to Center City streets.
NEWS
February 21, 2005
EARNI YOUNG'S article "Betting on improved urban casino" was instructive and timely. Facilities for casino gambling, if properly conceived, will likely be a net asset to the growing entertainment and dining industry in Philadelphia. According to Ms. Young, the powers that be seemed to have decided to locate one of these operations at Reed Street on the waterfront. While properly focusing on the importance of facility and site design, Ms. Young's assessment makes no mention of real concerns over local traffic congestion and what is being done to address them.
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | By Adam L. Cataldo INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Camden County freeholders are proposing a 2001 budget that would maintain the county's current tax rate for another year. The budget, introduced yesterday, proposes spending $259.2 million, an increase of $12.2 million over last year. The property-tax rate would remain 86 cents per $100 of assessed value for a third year. Most of the additional money for the budget would come from the state, county spokesman Ken Shuttleworth said. In a statement, Freeholder Director Jeffrey L. Nash said: "We are proud to be able to offer our residents a budget that holds the line on county taxes while continuing to provide quality-of-life programs and projects.
NEWS
July 20, 2002 | By Thom Guarnieri INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pinelands Commission is reviewing the environmental impact of widening a 50-mile stretch of the Garden State Parkway. The plans for the widening, which are only preliminary, would add a northbound and a southbound lane between Somers Point and Toms River. Dennis Ingoglia, spokesman for the state Highway Authority, which operates the toll road, said the project was not funded at this point. "We are looking at permitting and design issues now," he said. The project could cost as much as $300 million if all 50 miles were widened, he said.
NEWS
August 25, 1998 | By Lewis Kamb, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Opponents of a highway project along the Delaware River yesterday lost a final appeal to block construction on their claim that a permit needed for the project had been illegally approved. The New Jersey Supreme Court ruled 6-1 to uphold a Superior Court decision from Thursday that refused to block construction on the Route 29 expansion project, which has roused controversy on both sides of the river. Construction is scheduled to begin this week, said John Dourgarian, a spokesman for the New Jersey Department of Transportation.
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dismantling of an abandoned railroad bridge in Upper Merion Township is scheduled to begin today to allow the widening of Route 23 at the entrance of the new Schuylkill Printing Plant of Philadelphia Newspapers Inc., publisher of The Inquirer and Daily News. Traffic will be rerouted around the bridge on temporary pavement while removal of the bridge continues for the next three weeks. The bridge was once used by the old Upper Merion & Plymouth Railroad, which mainly served the old Alan Wood Steel Co. Removal of the bridge will permit a northbound acceleration lane and a southbound turn lane at the plant entrance.
NEWS
March 6, 2008 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Calling it a problem ripe for solution, officials of the Center City District yesterday issued a report with short- and long-term recommendations for decreasing traffic congestion in downtown Philadelphia. Two decades of revitalizing Center City as a place to live and as a magnet for tourism, entertainment and dining has generated a competition among motorists, pedestrians, bicyclists and commercial delivery trucks that has pushed parts of Philadelphia's 17th-Century street grid past its limits, said Paul R. Levy, the Center City District president.
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