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Traffic Lanes

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NEWS
April 29, 1996 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For many Bucks County residents driving to Center City this morning, it may seem like old times - give or take 10 or 15 minutes. For the first time since last month's tire fire that severely damaged a stretch of Interstate 95, they'll be able to stay in the southbound lanes all the way to Center City. During the weekend, all I-95 traffic between Allegheny Avenue and Bridge Street was switched from the northbound to the southbound lanes, with two lanes of traffic in each direction.
NEWS
August 21, 2000 | TOM KELLY IV/ FOR THE DAILY NEWS ASSOCIATED PRESS
The King of Prussia Inn, which dates to the early 18th century, moves to its new home in King of Prussia. Workers (at right) begin the slow crawl away from the inn's original location between traffic lanes of Route 202 near Gulph Road. Workers watch (below left) as the 600-ton inn moves over a Route 202 bridge, which had to be shored up to bear the heavy load. Throngs of spectators (below right) watch as Peco Energy linemen raise electric cables to clear the roof of the inn. The move was only 2,400 feet, but the Expert House Movers and International Chimney firm stopped short of its destination yesterday.
NEWS
October 9, 2011 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Market Street and JFK Boulevard, there is so little that catches the eye that some pedestrians have been known to seek out patterns in the black, dried-out chewing gum that dots the sidewalks. And good luck riding a bike there; if you can dodge the fast-moving traffic, you just might crash into a double-parked car. Now imagine those streets as graciously landscaped boulevards, friendlier to bicyclists and pedestrians, but with plenty of room for cars. The city will take a small step toward that vision Saturday by reducing the lanes from four to three on parts of those thoroughfares.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | Daily News staff report
A two-week trial to reduce automobile traffic lanes from four to three on Market Street and JFK Boulevard, between 15th and 20th streets, to allow for bicycle lanes, did not hamper either parking nor loading and deliveries, the Mayor's Office of Transportation and Utilities said yesterday. "The trial has demonstrated that it's worth continuing to explore options for transforming Market Street and JFK west of City Hall into truly complete streets: streets that well serve pedestrians, buses, cars, delivery vehicles and bikes," said Rina Cutler, the deputy mayor for Transportation and Utilities.
NEWS
June 1, 1991 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MYRNA LUDWIG
RESCUERS CARRY a motorist to a stretcher after an accident last night on the West River Drive near the Strawberry Mansion Bridge. Police said the unidentified driver lost control of his car about 7:30 p.m., crossed four traffic lanes, pedestrian paths and the grassy shore before plunging into the Schuylkill. Three passers-by - William Cook Jr., Douglas Watson and Brian Lawson - pulled him out. He was taken to Hahnemann University Hospital with a head injury.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
When traffic lanes were eliminated on Spruce and Pine Streets from river to river in Center City five years ago to make room for bicycle lanes, it took more than just long strips of white paint to ensure a happy marriage between motorists and cyclists. An expensive and years-long project to uproot the city's 1940s-era traffic signals in the central area and replace them with digital ones that can be operated remotely made it possible. Through computer commands, officials were able to synchronize the lights so vehicular traffic could flow smoothly enough in one lane to allow bicyclists safe passage along the other.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | By Steve Edgcumbe, Special to The Inquirer
The East Whiteland Township Planning Commission has recommended approval of a plan by Windon Developers of Bala Cynwyd to build a shopping center on a 13- acre tract on Route 30 in Frazer. The plan for Westgate Plaza calls for a strip of 15 retail stores, including a pharmacy and restaurant, according to Windon Developers spokesman Tom Freethy. The plan also includes three free-standing stores in front of the shopping center, including a bank and fast-food restaurant, Freethy said.
NEWS
March 10, 1994 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
The $2.4 million decorative lighting system of the Benjamin Franklin Bridge is yet another victim of the dreaded winter of 1994. The lights have been out since the great ice storms of January and probably won't return for another month. "Huge chunks of ice fell off the towers - about 230 feet - and smashed about 30 fixtures," said C. Carlton Reed, spokesman for the Delaware River Port Authority. "We just felt it wouldn't look right to put the lights on without having all the lamps working.
NEWS
July 14, 1986 | By KEVIN HANEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Schuylkill Expressway drivers will be forced to endure another season of construction delays next year in the Vine Street interchange area, according to PennDOT officials. PennDOT district engineer Robert L. Rowland said today that the contractor working in that area this year is 10 weeks behind schedule on the job. That, said Rowland, means the contractor will be returning to the interchange area next year to finish the job. The contractor, a joint venture of Morrison-Knudsen Corp.
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NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
When traffic lanes were eliminated on Spruce and Pine Streets from river to river in Center City five years ago to make room for bicycle lanes, it took more than just long strips of white paint to ensure a happy marriage between motorists and cyclists. An expensive and years-long project to uproot the city's 1940s-era traffic signals in the central area and replace them with digital ones that can be operated remotely made it possible. Through computer commands, officials were able to synchronize the lights so vehicular traffic could flow smoothly enough in one lane to allow bicyclists safe passage along the other.
NEWS
April 9, 2012
WHEN A STATE trooper knocked on the door of an Altoona home in response to a drunken-driving complaint, he was greeted by a scantily clad woman offering him two yellow roses. The woman, who was wearing only a green top and underwear, told Trooper Thomas Laskey that she had been entertaining a "cop fantasy," authorities said. Laskey was not impressed. He told Monica M. Barnhart, 40, that he didn't want any flowers and ordered her to get dressed and come with him. The trooper said he suspected that what led the woman to drop her pants and pick up the flowers was overindulgence in what was causing her to reek of alcohol.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | Daily News staff report
A two-week trial to reduce automobile traffic lanes from four to three on Market Street and JFK Boulevard, between 15th and 20th streets, to allow for bicycle lanes, did not hamper either parking nor loading and deliveries, the Mayor's Office of Transportation and Utilities said yesterday. "The trial has demonstrated that it's worth continuing to explore options for transforming Market Street and JFK west of City Hall into truly complete streets: streets that well serve pedestrians, buses, cars, delivery vehicles and bikes," said Rina Cutler, the deputy mayor for Transportation and Utilities.
NEWS
October 9, 2011 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Market Street and JFK Boulevard, there is so little that catches the eye that some pedestrians have been known to seek out patterns in the black, dried-out chewing gum that dots the sidewalks. And good luck riding a bike there; if you can dodge the fast-moving traffic, you just might crash into a double-parked car. Now imagine those streets as graciously landscaped boulevards, friendlier to bicyclists and pedestrians, but with plenty of room for cars. The city will take a small step toward that vision Saturday by reducing the lanes from four to three on parts of those thoroughfares.
NEWS
May 4, 2011
ON FRIDAY THE city broke the seal on the most closely guarded secret since the Manhattan Project when it revealed where Center City bike lanes will be added - southbound 10th between Spring Garden and Lombard, and northbound 13th between South and Spring Garden. Already clogged, after one of the two traffic lanes is surrendered to bikes, those arteries will look like those of someone who eats fettuccine Alfredo for breakfast, fried chicken for lunch and supersized Big Macs for dinner.
NEWS
May 24, 2010
I WAS HAPPY as a chipmunk on a log to read that in recent months bicycle-riding on Spruce and Pine had nearly doubled and riding on the sidewalk had dropped by up to 70 percent on those two streets. I felt a weird thrill when I read that in a letter to the editor from Sarah Clark Stuart, campaign director of the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia. The stats for bike-riding almost doubling came from a study last year made by coalition volunteers, counting bicycles at four intersections on Pine and Spruce.
NEWS
October 4, 2008
When the Benjamin Franklin Parkway was modeled on the Champs-?lys?es a century ago, Philadelphians stumbled over one critically important detail: They failed to include the sidewalk cafes. Until this week. On Monday, the first year-round cafe on the Parkway opened on a triangular slice of Fairmount Park land at 16th Street near JFK Plaza's LOVE Park. At a festive ceremony amid cascades of red balloons, state and city officials joined civic leaders to herald this slice of Paris.
NEWS
July 19, 2008
It was a hair-raising adventure for many of the folks on foot who carefully made their way to the center lanes of Benjamin Franklin Parkway for Thursday's public announcement of a welcome $17.1 million plan to upgrade the boulevard. Cars whizzed along the outer lanes as usual, making some pedestrians' journey a potential life-and-death moment. Gov. Rendell and Mayor Nutter needed no better illustration of why the Parkway needs to be more pedestrian-friendly. Their announcement was welcome to those who have waged a years-long effort to wrest back the Parkway from car and truck traffic.
NEWS
November 20, 2003 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As high gusts of wind swirled through downtown yesterday, a 40-foot-high wooden scaffold collapsed in Center City, injuring three workers who were on it. The trio were repairing the fa?ade at the top of a building at 929 Arch Street in Chinatown when the scaffolding, draped with a blue tarp, suddenly tilted and gave way about 1:30 p.m. The structure fell across Arch Street, landing on top of three occupied cars in both traffic lanes as well...
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