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Traffic Signals

NEWS
December 17, 1989 | By Edward Ohlbaum, Special to The Inquirer
Traffic lights will be installed soon at three congested intersections in Buckingham, but a traffic signal for an intersection called the "most dangerous in the township" faces a delay. Supervisors Chairman George M. Collie said the first light was scheduled to go up at Edison-Furlong Road and Route 263. Two others will follow at Holicong and York Roads and at Route 413 and Mechanicsville Road, he said. Funds for the lights are in hand, and the board expects to advertise for bids in the next four to six weeks, Collie said.
NEWS
December 13, 2011
More than 100 traffic signals in Northeast Philadelphia are set for upgrades, thanks to a $10 million grant from the federal government, U.S. Rep. Allyson Y. Schwartz (D., Pa.) announced Monday. The money comes from the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The grant was awarded by the U.S. Department of Transportation. The traffic signals are along nearly 16 miles of roadway, with the majority on Bustleton, Castor, and Oxford Avenues. - Robert Moran
NEWS
August 7, 1988 | By Marilou Regan, Special to The Inquirer
Ridley Park says pedestrians often do not have enough time to cross Chester Pike at Hinkson Boulevard or Rodney Road. Borough officials say that when the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation recently completed the synchronization of signals along Chester Pike to improve traffic flow, it caused signals at the cross streets to remain green for fluctuating amounts of time. And they want PennDOT to do something to correct the problem. At the Borough Council's work session Wednesday night, borough manager Charles Neely presented copies of a letter that he sent to PennDOT's district engineer.
NEWS
May 20, 1990 | By Marjorie Keen, Special to The Inquirer
Valley Township supervisors have given a green light to a shopping center plan that will bring the first traffic lights to the township. In a 3-1 vote Thursday, the supervisors approved preliminary plans for the Airport Village shopping center. In return, the developer, Hough/Loew Associates of Exton, will give the township a half-acre triangle of land. The land will enable the township to straighten the intersection of Lincoln Highway and Airport Road. The board also amended the zoning ordinance to allow grocery and dairy stores in the center and to cut the number of required parking spaces.
NEWS
July 26, 1999 | By Denise-Marie Balona, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Local officials plan to spend almost $4 million on several municipal improvements in the next year, including a home for K-9 police officers, a new roller rink, and traffic signals. Township Manager Pat Halbe said the projects were part of the municipality's annual attempt to accommodate this quickly-growing community of about 39,000 residents. The Township Council last week introduced a bond ordinance that would fund the proposal, which includes a $200,000 down payment for the improvements.
NEWS
June 7, 1999 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As workers repair and modernize West Chester Pike, motorists will have to keep threading their way around barrels and cones all summer. Next spring will bring more of the same. Crews are seven weeks into an $8.8 million project of replacing worn concrete, rebuilding shoulders and installing "mountable" medians along the six-mile stretch between Boot Road in Newtown Township and Route 352 in Westtown, said spokesman Gene Blaum of the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. And they are poised to begin a nearly $1 million project by mid-June upgrading signals at nine pike intersections in Upper Darby from Victory Lane to Township Line Road.
NEWS
September 16, 1990 | By Ovetta Wiggins, Special to The Inquirer
The first phase of a study aimed at streamlining traffic on highways in Burlington County has been completed, with recommendations for additional traffic signals and revised speed limits on some roads. The state Division of Highway Traffic Safety awarded $3,802 to pay for the study in Burlington County. Six other counties and municipalities in the state were awarded money for similar studies. County traffic engineer Joseph Pavlik said that as a result of the study, some changes were expected to be made on some county roads.
NEWS
January 29, 1999 | By Mary Anne Janco and Deirdre Shaw, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation is gearing up for one of the biggest improvement projects on West Chester Pike in decades - a $22 million undertaking designed to enhance the traffic flow and safety on the 18.5-mile highway that runs from Upper Darby to West Chester. The six-part project is set to start in Upper Darby in March. It will modernize traffic signals at 68 intersections, install new curb and grass medians, and give Haverford, Upper Darby and West Chester state-of-the-art computer traffic signal systems to remotely operate and monitor their signals, according to PennDot.
NEWS
January 29, 1995 | By Christine Schiavo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Someday soon motorists will no longer have to put up with the pesky traffic pattern on Oxford Valley Road: Crawl for a while and then idle at a red light. A plan to link seven signals north of Business Route 1 is expected to unclog the consistently congested artery. The Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission recently listed the plan in the $6 billion Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement program (CMAQ), which makes it eligible for federal money. The program channels money to projects that reduce automobile emissions and contribute to cleaner air. "When there are many signals on one road, you're likely to have more delays," said Charles Dougherty, manager of the DVRPC's office of plans and programs.
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | By Galina Espinoza, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Under a capital improvement project underwritten in large part by the county freeholders, the township will get seven new or improved traffic signals in the next two months. There are also local and state plans for the reconstruction of several intersections, said Marge Greenberg, project administrator for the township's Department of Engineering. Most of the improvements were proposed about two years ago when major work on Route 70 began, she said. But the New Jersey Department of Transportation requires extensive data on things such as traffic volume and the number of accidents before approving intersection improvements.
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