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Traffic Signals

NEWS
January 20, 1991 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Luis "911" Aviles, 21, of North Philadelphia, plunked down $150 early last fall for a leather jacket that caught his eye. The coat was hard to miss. It was dyed yellow, green and red, and on the back was a huge eight ball. "I got it because it was a new style, and I liked it because of the colors," said Aviles. The brightly colored "eight ball" that Aviles sports as if it were made of solid gold is the most popular of the new, vivid and sometimes pricey leather coats and jackets that have become the oh-so-fresh style.
NEWS
August 6, 2000 | By Margie Fishman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It's 9:30 a.m. on a weekday and calm in this tiny town named after ledges of rock. At the intersection of Robbins Avenue and Huntingdon Pike, children play on a church lawn, and a trio of seniors take small steps on the opposite sidewalk. But just then, a United Parcel Service truck disrupts the serenity by speeding down Robbins, which has a 25 m.p.h. speed limit, trying to make a 10-second-long green light. The driver misses, and the interminable wait begins. Over the last five years, some of the locals say, traffic at the only major crossroad in Rockledge has become so horrendous that they refuse to leave their homes after 3:30 p.m. Others take refuge on winding back roads to avoid state Route 232, which offers a straight shot into Philadelphia and Abington Township.
NEWS
May 5, 1986 | By Elizabeth Hallowell, Special to The Inquirer
Montgomery County officials have outlined six years' worth of road, bridge and intersection improvement projects to be financed by money collected under the recently enacted transportation fee. The fee, assessed on all new development, went into effect Jan. 1 and is expected to generate $2.5 million this year. The following are local projects planned for this year: Overlaying a one-mile strip of asphalt on Easton Road at the junction of Route 309 in Cheltenham Township.
NEWS
November 8, 2006
WHY DO the Roosevelt Boulevard pedestrians jaywalk and cross against the red light? Not everybody speeds and weaves in and out on the Boulevard. I've had to slam on the brakes many times while going the posted limit, with a green light. Some pedestrians believe they don't have to obey traffic signals, but the laws for drivers and pedestrians should be equally enforced. Howard Kieffer, Philadelphia
NEWS
May 22, 1992 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
It was a textbook case of government in action . . . sort of. In recent weeks, citizens have been beating on their Council members. They, in turn, raised holy hell yesterday with the Rendell administration. The issue? Traffic signals at about 800 locations throughout the city. The Streets Department has begun replacing traffic lights with four-way stop signs in the name of safety. City officials have detailed studies that purport to prove their point. Council members worked themselves into quite a froth, briefly considering a motion from Councilman David Cohen that would have forced the administration to get Council approval before removing any traffic lights.
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
To take the "stop" out of stop-and-go traffic, Philadelphia is spending about $90 million over three years to upgrade traffic signals and synchronize lights at more than 600 intersections along 21 major corridors in the city. The first streets to get the upgrades are Oregon Avenue, 29th Street, Verree Road, Belmont Avenue, Bustleton Avenue, Chestnut Street, Walnut Street, and Woodland Avenue, said Stephen Buckley, deputy commissioner for transportation at the Streets Department.
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ever since the Blue Route opened, many drivers have been missing the red at the Baltimore Pike interchange. And the number of collisions there has caused the township to refuse to accept ownership of the new traffic signals for fear of being sued by accident victims. Nether Providence Police have responded to more than 50 car accidents, including two fatals and several fender-benders, at the interchange since the interstate opened in December 1991. And time after time, the drivers responsible for the accidents claim they just didn't see the red lights on the traffic signals installed at the end of the four ramps to Interstate 476. Or else, they say, they saw the red lights too late.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2009 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's traffic lights are all about to go green. The city plans to replace 55,000 green - and yellow - energy-hogging incandescent traffic signals with efficient light-emitting diodes, or LEDs, said Andrew Stober, director of strategic initiatives in the mayor's Office of Transportation and Utilities. When the project is done in two years, every traffic light at the city's 2,800 signaled intersections will be equipped with the low-wattage LEDs. (The red lights were switched to LEDs about 10 years ago.)
NEWS
May 13, 1999 | By Denise-Marie Balona, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Major improvements to bridges in Evesham, Lumberton and Southampton and new traffic signals in Mount Laurel and Westampton are among the dozens of projects that would be funded by an $11 million bond ordinance the Burlington County Board of Freeholders introduced yesterday. County engineer Joseph G. Caruso introduced a list of road construction and improvement projects that the county should finish by next summer. The freeholders would contribute about $10.98 million toward the $14.18 million project, with about $3.2 million coming from the state toward road resurfacing.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | By Monica L. Williams, Special to The Inquirer
Rockledge Council members are trying to bring recycling to the borough. Council members reviewed a videotape on recycling after Monday night's business meeting. The seven-minute film, "Recycling is in Your Hands," was lent to the council by Lower Southampton Township officials. The film explains the forms of recyling and demonstrates procedures for recycling. "We're interested in convincing people that this is the right thing," said Councilwoman Patricia Goldberg, the public safety coordinator.
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