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Traffic Signals

NEWS
April 17, 2009 | By Kia Gregory INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On Easter afternoon, Sharon Boyd was standing on her front lawn in West Mount Airy, smiling at her husband and son as they moved new 10-foot columns onto their once-enclosed porch. After nearly two years of dealing with insurance adjusters, lawyers, building inspectors, and contractors, the Boyds were finally rebuilding the porch - wrecked when a speeding SUV rammed into a traffic pole on Lincoln Drive, launched into the air, and crash-landed inside it. As Boyd eyed the traffic, her dog, Peaches, in her arms, she thought, "Not again.
NEWS
June 20, 2008
HAVING been homeless, I can tell you it's bad, but it could be worse. People make homeless men seem like they're not men, but they are - with different problems. All homeless men aren't on drugs, a few are lawyers, doctors, even ex-military. Being homeless has its ups and downs. Some homeless men were put on the street because they had a fight with wives or family, some are just out of prison. I was homeless at age 20. I burned my bridges, slept on a park bench for three days having nowhere to go. Yes, I was the same person who, when a homeless man asked me for a dollar, laughed at him. Then the tables turned.
NEWS
September 14, 2007
I COMPLETELY agree with Michael Smerconish and his trials and tribulations with the traffic signals on Roosevelt Boulevard. I traveled the same route for many years, though not at 3:45 a.m. At that hour, my solution would be to carefully go through the intersection, after checking to make sure there was no traffic (or police!). I face a situation on Henry Avenue at Wise Mill Road. This intersection cries out for a traffic-actuated light, not a timed one. I pass by many times daily, and get stopped by the red light about 85 percent of the time.
NEWS
September 6, 2007 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
ON A RECENT morning, I nearly blew a gasket during my commute. Drive time for me is 3:45 a.m., and on this day, I needed to drive the length of Roosevelt Boulevard from the Bucks County line all the way to City Line. I was driving an F-150, and clutching a cup of Dunkin' Donuts' finest. Big Daddy was talking about the Phils, and I was right on time. Until I hit the lights. From the top of the Northeast to Oxford Circle, I hit every red light - despite using every conceivable strategy to see green.
NEWS
August 6, 2007 | By Jeremy Rogoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
From his window in the office tower overlooking Conshohocken, investment banker R.J. Kelly has a stellar view of what for commuters is the town's most famed feature - the bridge across the Schuylkill linking the borough with I-76 and the Blue Route. During any given rush hour, the fastest way to traverse the span is to walk. Driving can take 15 minutes to travel the 1,848 feet. By foot it's five minutes. "It's really messy. That thing's backed up from light to light," said Kelly, who commutes in every day from Bristol, Bucks County, and across the bridge that links Conshohocken with West Conshohocken.
NEWS
November 8, 2006
WHY DO the Roosevelt Boulevard pedestrians jaywalk and cross against the red light? Not everybody speeds and weaves in and out on the Boulevard. I've had to slam on the brakes many times while going the posted limit, with a green light. Some pedestrians believe they don't have to obey traffic signals, but the laws for drivers and pedestrians should be equally enforced. Howard Kieffer, Philadelphia
NEWS
October 25, 2006
ROOSEVELT Boulevard, an outdated, poorly designed stretch of highway with some of the deadliest intersections in America, must be fixed. But the answer as to "how?" has long been elusive. Far too long, in fact. The Roosevelt Boulevard Safety Task Force, a panel of experts organized by PennDOT and the city, was organized in response to a 2002 Daily News series about the highway. As a result, the pedestrian crosswalks have been revamped, crossing signs have been erected and red-light cameras have been installed at intersections.
NEWS
August 15, 2006
Re: "A new voice of authority is heard," July 13: Pennsylvania Council of the Blind wishes to thank Renee Kirby, the mayor's Commission on People with Disabilities, Temple University, and the Philadelphia Streets Department for addressing an ongoing safety issue for the visually impaired. With the construction of the audible traffic signals (ATS) at selected intersections, such as Broad and Spring Garden Streets, visually impaired individuals will be able to cross a busy street with the same confidence of a totally sighted person.
NEWS
August 23, 2005 | By Fran Gerstein
Recently, I read about two teenage drivers - a 15-year-old without a proper license in Philadelphia and a 17-year-old in Monroe Township - who were involved in fatal auto accidents. Those incidents made me wonder whether we, as parents of teenagers, take enough responsibility when allowing our children to drive. I am the mother of two young drivers, a 20-year-old who got his license three years ago and a 16-year-old who hopes to pass her test soon. Based on the 100 hours I spent teaching them how to parallel park, turn right on red (unless prohibited)
NEWS
April 20, 2005 | By Larry Fish INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ever since the first roads were built, crossroads have been economic activity zones, and Plymouth and Whitemarsh Townships have boomed, in part, because of the Mid-County Interchange between the Pennsylvania Turnpike and the Blue Route. But as any local commuter knows, traffic on the area's main roads - especially Germantown and Ridge Pikes - can easily turn into a crawl, even under normal conditions. "We have more interchanges than any other county in the state," said Leo D. Bagley, Montgomery County's chief of transportation planning.
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