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Traffic Signals

NEWS
June 14, 2001 | By Jere Downs INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Beginning next week, a huge crane swinging steel beams as long as football fields will occasionally muscle traffic off Interstate 95 as workers build new ramps to Philadelphia International Airport. Motorists should prepare for short detours from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. some nights between Mondays and Thursdays until Labor Day. Closing the highway is the only way to safely pluck and perch beams as heavy as 49 tons, officials said yesterday. Closing the road "is a last resort," Regional Federal Highway Administrator Carmine Fiscina said at a news conference.
NEWS
January 14, 2001 | By Brendan January, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It's getting dark on a recent snowy Friday afternoon. In a cramped room at Traffic Operations South in Mount Laurel, Mike Sickels studies a wall of video monitors. Gleaming strings of headlights and red taillights fill the screens, captured live by cameras mounted on 35- and 40-foot-tall poles. Brake lights glow at stoplights, ramps clog with cars moving onto the interstates, joining a river of motorists eager to get home. Sickels searches for any sign of an accident or slowdown.
NEWS
November 27, 2000 | By Margie Fishman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Five towns in eastern Montgomery County are pooling funds to install a $1.3 million system that promises to ease traffic flow on Route 611 by linking and retiming traffic lights at 40 intersections. Abington, Cheltenham, Jenkintown, Horsham and Upper Moreland will pay for an estimated $325,000 in engineering costs associated with the system, which will affect an 11-mile stretch of the road between Philadelphia and Warrington, Bucks County. Construction costs will be subsidized through federal funds awarded by the state Department of Transportation to the municipalities in the spring.
NEWS
November 26, 2000 | By Barbara Boyer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's so tempting. That traffic signal ahead just turned yellow, cars are backing up to enter the Vine Expressway, and you're late for dinner. Instead of stopping as the law requires, you blow through that just-turned-red light hoping to shave a few minutes off your commute. This time you get away, but in the future, breaking this law might not be so easy. If Councilman Frank Rizzo Jr. gets his way, the City of Brotherly Love will embrace Big Brother by installing surveillance cameras to catch red-light runners and those who block intersections.
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | By Michelle Jeffery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Upper Dublin Township officials have agreed to wait until next month to vote on a plan for $6.3 million in road improvements around the Fort Washington Office Park. The proposed transportation development district was the topic of a public hearing Tuesday night that will continue Oct. 17 to give property owners more time to digest the information, said William Gift, president of the Board of Commissioners. "We thought that was a fairly reasonable request. . . . There's no reason for us to ram something down their throats," Gift said in an interview yesterday.
NEWS
August 29, 2000 | By Melia Bowie, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ladies and gentlemen, start your engines. Or better yet, take the bus. The results of a $65,000 traffic study are in, and while congestion is not rampant, it is becoming a rush-hour nuisance, officials here say. Every day, more than 60,000 cars drive the township's main arteries - Route 202, Morris Road, Skippack Pike (Route 73) and Walton Road. Much of that use comes from commuter traffic, according to the study done by McMahon Associates Inc. of Fort Washington from March 1998 through July.
NEWS
August 25, 2000 | by Chris Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
James Maleno crossed North Broad Street at an angle yesterday afternoon, dodging the rush-hour traffic between Arch and Cherry streets on his way home. He was breaking the law - jaywalking - and shrugged when asked about last week's dust-up in Los Angeles, where police stopped and detained an aide to Mayor Street for crossing an intersection against a red light. "It's against the law," he said, standing on an island in the middle of the street. "I guess they were just upholding the law. In Philadelphia, it's ridiculous because everyone does it. " Mayor Street's war of words with the Los Angeles Police Department lasted six days and Philadelphians are left wondering - all this about jaywalking?
NEWS
August 6, 2000 | By Margie Fishman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It's 9:30 a.m. on a weekday and calm in this tiny town named after ledges of rock. At the intersection of Robbins Avenue and Huntingdon Pike, children play on a church lawn, and a trio of seniors take small steps on the opposite sidewalk. But just then, a United Parcel Service truck disrupts the serenity by speeding down Robbins, which has a 25 m.p.h. speed limit, trying to make a 10-second-long green light. The driver misses, and the interminable wait begins. Over the last five years, some of the locals say, traffic at the only major crossroad in Rockledge has become so horrendous that they refuse to leave their homes after 3:30 p.m. Others take refuge on winding back roads to avoid state Route 232, which offers a straight shot into Philadelphia and Abington Township.
NEWS
May 18, 2000 | by Scott Heimer, Daily News Staff Writer
The city's seen the light in South Philadelphia. And the light is green - as in money - not red, as in red ink. We're talking traffic lights here, and they're getting easier to see. And cheaper to keep operational. The big change is the switch from the incandescent bulb of the days of Tom Edison to the light-emitting diode (LED) of the era of the VCR, the computer, the small appliance, virtually anything electronic. LEDs are pinhead-sized lights. They cost a lot less to operate than the incandescent.
NEWS
May 11, 2000 | By Melia Bowie, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In the first revision of the township comprehensive plan since 1987, the Board of Supervisors has revealed its vision for a greener, more walkable community anchored by a shopping district that would act as a town hub. Residents, local officials and urban planners met earlier this week to discuss the future of the community, which is bordered by major thoroughfares. The big push will be to transform the township into a "unified community" connected by a Bethlehem Pike shopping district with shared parking and driveways.
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