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NEWS
April 25, 2001
Physicians busted for allegedly distributing OxyContin without prescription - even though the pills can be lethal - should be called OxyMorons.
NEWS
November 6, 2003
IRECENTLY attended a panel at Haverford College titled "Three Women, Three Faiths, One Shared Vision," sponsored by Partners for Peace. One woman was a Palestinian Christian, one was an Israeli Jew, the third was a Palestinian Muslim. They are touring the country speaking out about the Palestinian-Israeli situation. There wasn't anything said that I hadn't read about before, but to meet people who live with this crisis makes it very personal. It was very, very sad to hear what they had to say. It made my heart weep.
NEWS
February 16, 1986
What Common Pleas Court Judge Bernard J. Avellino lacks in character, perhaps he can make up for in class by stepping down from the bench. If he would do so, I would then believe he is a man of his own speedy conviction. And, perhaps, more telling in all of this would be a comparison between a "coyote ugly" person who chews his way free to a "judge" who has set his own trap. This points out, more vividly than anything, the tragedy of politicized judicial selection. H. R. Collins Devon.
NEWS
October 15, 2001
IT'S BEEN a month since this tragedy has visited us. What have we learned? That fear can replace happiness, anger can replace peace. I recently chatted with a person of the Moslem faith. As a Christian, I was having a hard time dealing with this. He pointed out some of the reasons why it happened. First, most Islamic countries are poor and highly uneducated. Regimes like the Taliban, feed off the fear of the people. Also, believe it or not, some of these problems stem from the days of Isaac and Ismail, a fight between brothers that happened over 8,000 years ago. Are we not all God's children?
NEWS
August 25, 1987 | By JOSEPH GRACE, Daily News Staff Writer
Sicily Minor, 9, remembers walking through the picturesque Wissahickon Valley on a sunny Sunday in Fairmount Park when tragedy struck. Sicily was with Margaret Robertson, 37, when Robertson's 2-year-old son, Nolan Robertson Deal, fell through a partially open sewer and was swept away in a rushing stream of sewage water. The boy is still missing. "We were walking through the park," Sicily said last night. "It was around 4 o'clock. He got out of his wagon and ran through the grass.
NEWS
October 27, 1999
Again, a plane tumbles from the sky with a famous person among those aboard. Again, thoughts about celebrity and mortality that seem at once powerful and trite are busily shared across the nation's electronic town square. Golfer Payne Stewart's celebrity wasn't of nearly the same wattage as John F. Kennedy Jr.'s, but in his knickers and tam, he cut quite a figure in his sport's verdant, coddled world. His swing made purists' heart flutter. His story of rediscovering God and family, thus softening edges that had made him enemies, was tailor-made for an age in love with redemption.
NEWS
August 2, 2001
We all hurt when someone we love dies, especially when it happens tragically. We should look at this unfortunate accident to young Kyle Harris and ask ourselves: What can I do to prevent other ocurrences of this nature? Who's to blame? We are, when we don't drive home the importance of safety. Some dangers we can foresee; some we can't. Geraldine Woodson Philadelphia Only time will open the eyes of the public to the reality that although it's partly Kyle's fault for entering that motorman's cab, it's also SEPTA's fault for leaving the door unlocked and not having transit police patroling.
NEWS
October 9, 2006
RE THE anonymous caller to Jill Porter who left the message that the way to stop gun violence is to "make every male black teenager take target practice. " I am a 41-year-old married white father who grew up in Northeast Philadelphia, and live in Queen Village. I am grateful that I have never been poor and was raised in a two-parent household by a mother and father who loved me and my sister. Technically, I have nothing in common with most of the perps and victims involved in gun violence.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Laura Finamore, Jim Gaines, Abid Gilani, Robert Gildersleeve, Derrick E. Griffith, Rachel Jacobs, Giuseppe Piras, Justin Zemser. As each name was read, a bell rang out and white dove of peace was released into the afternoon sky. Dozens of first responders, volunteers, neighbors as well as city, state, and federal officials gathered Sunday near the site of Tuesday's Amtrak derailment for a service of remembrance and reflection for those who...
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, DANA DiFILIPPO, REGINA MEDINA, DAVID GAMBACORTA & WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writers bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
A LONG, GRAY day of digging through the twisted-metal jigsaw-puzzle wreckage of Amtrak Train 188 in an industrial no man's land in Frankford yielded the first but hardly the last answer to what caused the worst Northeast Corridor rail accident in nearly three decades: Speed killed. Robert Sumwalt, of the National Transportation Safety Board, said at a news conference that data showed the train had hit 106 mph - more than double the 50 mph speed limit for the sharp left curve at Frankford Junction - right as the engineer hit the emergency brake, to no avail, in the derailment at 9:21 p.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
May 15, 2015
TUESDAY night I went through a crash course in what really matters, in humanity, in mortality. I was watching the news reports about the Amtrak derailment, and amid my secondhand anguish for injured strangers I thanked God - literally thanked him out loud - for the fact that my immigration hearing in Baltimore had been canceled. Had it not been, I might have been sitting in one of those mangled cars. But relief quickly and seamlessly turned into fear, as I realized that a person I hold deep and dearly in my heart travels regularly on that route, commuting between her homes in Philly and New York.
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
If not for the horrible coincidence, there wouldn't be much in common between the girls' lacrosse programs from Cherokee and Shawnee. Other than proximity and history and rivalry and familiarity and everything else that binds together athletes and coaches from sister schools in the same sport in the same district, that is. But all that stuff was cast in a different light when these teenagers and their coaches paused to consider the deepest connection...
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
  It's hard to think of many stories that open with such a monstrously sobering, almost unbearable sense of impending doom as Bloodline , Netflix's latest original production. The series wastes no time telling us that it will be a tragedy, a horrible, deeply affecting story about the destruction of a family, and a compelling lesson in fatalism. Netflix will post all 13 first-season episodes on Friday. An intricately drawn and superbly cast portrait of a family in crisis that evokes Raymond Carver and James Dickey, Bloodline has the feel, the imaginative reach and aesthetic depth and resonance of a novel.
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
They were just kids, Haddon Township High School friends in the springtime of their lives. Boys and girls hanging out in houses, driving Jersey roads, pulling pranks. Laughing. But in July 2006, the laughter was cut short. One of the friends, 16-year-old junior and field hockey player Ann Marie Lynch, died in a jet ski accident off Ocean City. "That was my first experience with mortality," said Tom Turcich, one of the pack, now 25. For months, he walked around in a fog of grief. Until one day in class, he saw the movie Dead Poets Society and had his own carpe diem moment.
NEWS
March 9, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The filmmakers ask Richard Norcross to pull over at the house where he was shot five times - the house where his younger brother and another law enforcement officer were gunned down 20 years ago. "It's a very eerie feeling," says Norcross, who was a Haddon Heights police detective when Leslie Nelson's bloody rampage made national headlines. Glancing at the innocuous two-story dwelling on Sylvan Drive where his life changed forever on April 20, 1995, Norcross adds, "There are no good memories here.
NEWS
February 24, 2015 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - For those who witnessed his historic public suicide, the ghost of the late treasurer R. Budd Dwyer still haunts the Capitol. When news broke late last month that Rob McCord would step down as treasurer and plead guilty to federal criminal charges, it stopped some Harrisburg veterans in their tracks. They had flashbacks to the snowy day in January 1987 when Dwyer, a Crawford County teacher and former lawmaker who had risen to statewide office, stunned the state and the nation with his horrifying final act. Some could not grasp that McCord, who admitted last week that he shook down contractors for campaign contributions, committed his crimes while occupying the same office where Dwyer - convicted of similar crimes - put a .357 Magnum in his mouth and pulled the trigger as reporters yelled at him to stop and cameras rolled.
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
'It's man against nature, as well as man against man," Kevin Macdonald says about Black Sea , his submarine thriller set in the darkest waters off the Crimean coast. In the film, which opened in theaters Friday, Jude Law plays a bruising, brooding Scot, a marine salvage expert laid off from the job he has held for years. He throws in with a small group of fired coworkers, joined by a crew of Russian misfits, to search for a Nazi U-boat that has spent the last 70 years collecting silt on the ocean floor.
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
The cell reception at her West Chester home had been spotty. So after watching her three oldest children get onto the school bus at the end of her driveway, Jackie Collas dialed Verizon and asked about boosting the signal. It had been a harsh winter, and she worried about being able to reach 911 in an emergency. After hanging up on that morning last February, she went to check on Curren, her 2-year-old. She found him trapped and motionless beneath his overturned, five-drawer dresser.
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