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June 17, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two newlyweds who were injured in the crash of Amtrak Train 188 on May 12 are the latest to sue the rail line and engineer Brandon Bostian in federal district court in Philadelphia, alleging that reckless operation of the train caused its derailment. Declan MacFarland, 34, and Kathryn Varnum, 33, were on their way to New York from Varnum's parents' home in northern Virginia when the train derailed. MacFarland had scheduled a job interview for the following day, and Varnum, an employee of a public relations firm, had intended to confer with a client.
NEWS
December 11, 1986 | By LEON TAYLOR and TOM OPDYKE, Daily News Staff Writers
Benjamin Robbins was holding an ice bag to his bleeding nose, his shirt and hands stained with blood, as he tried to come to grips with the fact that it finally had happened to him. After 17 years of riding the commuter rail lines, Robbins, 62, had been in a train crash. He was one of 42 persons hurt at 5:28 p.m. yesterday when an Airport High Speed Line train slammed into the rear of a four-car Chestnut Hill West (R-8) train as it was loading passengers on Track 3 at Suburban Station.
NEWS
May 26, 1989 | By Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police have arrested three Southwest Philadelphia juveniles and are looking for a fourth for questioning in the collision Wednesday of a SEPTA Airport Line train and a runaway Conrail coal car. The SEPTA engineer and 20 passengers were injured and were treated at several hospitals. Arrested Wednesday night were Timothy Rollerson, 14, of the 2200 block of South 56th Street; Spencer Tinsley, 13, of the 2400 block of South 57th Street, and Willie Jackson, 15, of the 5400 block of Harley Terrace.
NEWS
December 12, 1986 | By Susan Caba, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA officials are trying to determine whether a new wheel-lubricating device contributed to Wednesday's rush-hour collision of two trains at Suburban Station. "It's early to be pinpointing causes," said John Tucker, head of the transit authority's Regional Rail Division, "but the flange lubricator is one of the things we're looking at. " The one-car airport train that crashed into the rear of a loaded Chestnut Hill West train Wednesday had been equipped just a day or two before with devices to lubricate the steel wheels automatically, Tucker said.
NEWS
January 8, 1987 | By Theresa Sullivan Barger, Special to The Inquirer
Esther B. Burkhart once turned down a receptionist's position at Chestnut Hill College because she wanted a job where she could see and talk to people of all ages. The 71-year-old Erdenheim woman frequently shared her time with others and "always had a smile on her face," friends and family members said. Burkhart was one of 15 people who died in Sunday's Amtrak passenger train crash in Maryland. She was returning home from a visit with her daughter, Carolee Palmai, of Crofton, Md. "She loved people," said Mary S. Helmetag, of Mount Airy, Burkhart's friend of 45 years.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Michael Warren, Associated Press
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - One commuter train slammed into another that had stopped between stations during the morning commute Thursday in suburban Buenos Aires, killing three passengers and injuring more than 300 on a line that has been under government control since a crash last year killed 51 people. The state-run train agency dismissed possible brake failure as a cause and suggested that the conductor was at fault. Satellite images show the train had braked normally at the previous station, and then rolled past four functioning warning signals without stopping before crash, the agency said.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | Breaking News Desk
Fifty-two Paulsboro residents filed a lawsuit against Conrail and its parent companies today, seeking compensation and medical surveillance after freight cars fell into Mantua Creek Nov. 30. One of the cars released toxic vinyl chloride into the atmosphere and caused many in the town to evacuate. The plaintiffs have suffered from chest pains and coughing fits as a result of their exposure to the hazardous chemical, and they fear they may contract more serious illnesses in the future, according to the suit.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAC-MEGANTIC, Quebec - Canadian authorities said yesterday that they have opened a criminal investigation into the fiery wreck of a runaway oil train in this small town as the death toll climbed to 15, with dozens more bodies feared buried in the burned-out ruins. Quebec police Inspector Michel Forget said investigators have "discovered elements" that have led to a criminal probe. He gave no details but ruled out terrorism. The death toll rose with the discovery of two more bodies yesterday.
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | By David Crary, Associated Press
LAC-MEGANTIC, Quebec - Canadian officials told distraught families Wednesday that 30 people still missing after the fiery crash of a runaway oil train are presumed dead. Along with 20 bodies found, that would put the death toll from Saturday's derailment and explosions in this lakeside town at 50. Hours before that somber meeting, the head of the U.S. railway company whose train crashed made his first visit to Lac-Megantic since the disaster, amid jeers from residents and criticism from politicians, including the Quebec premier.
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BUSINESS
June 17, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two newlyweds who were injured in the crash of Amtrak Train 188 on May 12 are the latest to sue the rail line and engineer Brandon Bostian in federal district court in Philadelphia, alleging that reckless operation of the train caused its derailment. Declan MacFarland, 34, and Kathryn Varnum, 33, were on their way to New York from Varnum's parents' home in northern Virginia when the train derailed. MacFarland had scheduled a job interview for the following day, and Varnum, an employee of a public relations firm, had intended to confer with a client.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
PASTOR JOEY FURJANIC didn't have time to shower the morning we met. He'd only slept a few hours, and even if his phone wasn't constantly buzzing with calls and texts from parishioners and reporters, he still wouldn't have gotten much rest. His mind was racing from the night before. He and his wife Lauren were relaxing in their Port Richmond home on May 12 with a few friends when sometime around 10 p.m. his phone started going off with texts from family and friends asking him about a train crash.
NEWS
May 27, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
When rescue workers arrived at the site of a Sept. 12, 2008, crash of a passenger rail train in Chatsworth, Calif., they encountered a scene of devastation and despair. The train, operated by a texting engineer, had run a red light on its route north of downtown Los Angeles and collided with a Union Pacific freight train twice its size, killing 25 and injuring more than 100 passengers. Bodies and limbs were strewn around the crash site. It was one of the worst rail disasters in U.S. history, but, like victims of the deadly May 12 Amtrak derailment in Philadelphia's Port Richmond neighborhood, the injured passengers soon learned Congress would limit total damages to $200 million.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE AMTRAK engineer driving Train 188 when it crashed last week in Frankford, killing eight and injuring more than 200, used his cellphone the day of the deadly derailment, the National Transportation Safety Board announced yesterday. But investigators haven't yet determined whether engineer Brandon Bostian made calls, sent texts and otherwise used his data plan while he was at the train's controls. Bostian, who was injured in the May 12 nighttime disaster, has told investigators he doesn't remember anything in the minutes before or during the crash.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | BECKY BATCHA
FOLLOWING A house fire, a hurricane, a catastrophic train wreck, volunteers and staff from the Red Cross materialize - seemingly out of thin air - to help victims back on their feet. "We address all those human needs that restore your dignity to you," says judge Renee Cardwell Hughes, CEO at the American Red Cross of Eastern Pennsylvania. Within hours after Tuesday night's Amtrak derailment, her people had manned two help centers for passengers and their worried families, one at 30th Street Station and another at Webster Elementary on Frankford Avenue.
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Aubrey Whelan, Michael Boren, and Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writers
In the seconds before Amtrak train No. 188 derailed at Frankford Junction, the train's speed surged from 70 m.p.h. to 102 m.p.h. - more than twice the speed limit on the dangerous curve, the National Transportation Safety Board announced Thursday. Just before the crash, with the train traveling at 106 m.p.h., the train's engineer, Brandon Bostian, hit his emergency brakes, NTSB officials said. But it was too late. Two days after the deadliest train crash on the Northeast Corridor in three decades, the revelations on the train's acceleration - while providing the most detailed account yet of the moments before the derailment - raised new questions about the 32-year-old engineer's actions.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
THE EARLY EVIDENCE suggests that speed, not decrepit infrastructure, was to blame for the horrific Amtrak train crash that killed seven people and injured hundreds more in Frankford on Tuesday. But the deadly incident naturally gave new life to longstanding concerns about the sorry state of America's aging, outdated rail system. The timing couldn't be worse. The Republican-led House Appropriations Committee voted yesterday to advance a bill that would cut Amtrak's funding by $260 million, to $1.14 billion, the Washington Post reported.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
THE QUESTION hanging in the air above the the twisted husks of train compartments in Frankford is simple: Could the horrific derailment that claimed seven lives on Tuesday have been prevented? Preliminary evidence seems to point in one direction: yes. The answer lies in technology that might sound foreign to anyone other than rail industry insiders. In the wake of a Metrolink train crash in California that killed 25 people, Congress passed the Rail Safety Improvement Act of 2008, which called for Positive Train Control technology to be installed on rail lines nationwide by the end of 2015.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | BY BARBARA LAKER & STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writers lakerb@phillynews.com, 215-854-5933
CAMOY HONEGAN was on the verge of nothingness a month ago. No home. No money. No way to finish college. "I would have had to quit," she told the Daily News yesterday. "I couldn't focus. I was at my breaking point. " Then Honegan's advisor at Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn told her she should talk to Derrick Griffith, dean of student affairs and enrollment management there. She did. And Griffith, or "Griff" as friends called him, picked up the phone and worked his magic.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
SEVENTY-TWO years ago, the wreck of the Pennsylvania Railroad's Congressional Limited prompted headlines including the words "Disastrous," "Horror," "Heroism. " Eighty people were killed and 292 injured in what Philadelphia newspapers of the day called "the worst train accident since 1918. " It happened at 6:08 p.m. Monday, Sept. 6, 1943, as many people were returning from Washington, D.C., to New York on a train that didn't stop in Philadelphia. But near Frankford Junction, as the train slowed to 56 mph, according to the engine's recording device, an axle on Coach No. 7 overheated and broke.
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