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Train Station

BUSINESS
November 14, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first new SEPTA train station to open in 20 years will begin operation this weekend. The 9th Street Station in Lansdale will add a stop to the Doylestown Line, SEPTA officials said Thursday. Lansdale's existing station will continue to operate, they said, and all trains on the line will stop at the new station at 141 West 9th Street. The existing Lansdale Station is undergoing construction to its parking facilities and free parking will be offered at the new station until construction is complete.
NEWS
October 23, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - The latest effort by Ardmore homeowners to block a controversial mixed-use development off Lancaster Avenue was greeted skeptically in Commonwealth Court on Wednesday. After a nearly three-hour hearing, Judge Dan Pellegrini allowed the developer, Dranoff Properties, to intervene as a party to the lawsuit and agreed to an expedited hearing for the defendants' objections. The Save Ardmore Coalition has asked the court to block the commonwealth from issuing $10.5 million in Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program funds for the eight-story residential and retail tower that would replace Lower Merion's Cricket Avenue parking lot. The coalition alleges it would be a misappropriation of funds because the legislature in 2007 approved $15 million in grants for "costs related to the redevelopment of the Ardmore train station.
NEWS
July 21, 2015
FOR MORE THAN 45 years, Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey has dedicated his life to improving the quality of life for people in three major cities. He has received multiple awards for community service and has garnered the respect of the president of the United States, as well as the respect of his peers around the world. In that time, the commissioner has demonstrated a willingness to make the tough, and sometimes unpopular, decisions surrounding matters that affect this city and the police department.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - In the grand halls of Union Station, you can get everything but a train. From Appalachian Spring to Victoria's Secret, 55 retail shops offer shoes, handbags, ties, chocolate, wine, perfume, cigars, watches, and clothes. Thirty-five restaurants and food stands will serve you plank-roasted salmon on a white tablecloth or a burrito in a brown paper bag. The many commercial lures - and the majesty of the monumental 1907 Beaux Arts building with its vaulted, coffered ceilings and classical statuary - have made Union Station a bigger draw than the Lincoln Memorial or the Smithsonian Institution: 37 million people pass under its arches each year.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sen. Bob Casey urged Amtrak to spruce up 30th Street Station to welcome visitors for the papal visit this fall and the Democratic National Convention in 2016. The Pennsylvania Democrat said Wednesday he wanted more retail and dining options and nicer restrooms. No new federal money is likely to be available to speed up improvements, Casey acknowledged in a news conference at the station, but he said he hoped private funding could fill the bill. He had no estimates on costs, specifics on renovations, or possible private contributors.
NEWS
November 10, 2014 | By Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
I was strolling along Bernauer Strasse during a foggy night typical of Berlin. The low-lying mist shrouded the streetlamps, casting sepia shadows on the neighborhood. The hues were reminiscent of old newsreels from August 1963, when this street became a last-gasp escape route for those seeking to flee over the Berlin Wall, a structure that was erected overnight in its initial crude form of concrete blocks and barbed wire. It encircled West Berlin to keep East Germans from escaping to the lone outpost of freedom behind the Iron Curtain.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Plans for expanded parking, higher platforms, improved waiting areas, and other upgrades at train stations along the 104-mile Keystone Corridor will move forward within the next few years, a Pennsylvania transportation representative said Friday. Five of the 12 train stations on the Keystone Corridor, which stretches from Harrisburg to Philadelphia, are in Chester County. "A lot of these stations, nothing has been done with them since my grandfather came home from World War II," said Jennie Granger, director of aviation at the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
A controversial redevelopment in downtown Ardmore is back on track after the state restored $10.5 million in grants that were previously pulled from the project. Carl Dranoff, president of Dranoff Properties, said the funding was critical for a high-rise apartment and retail complex across from the Ardmore train station. "Up until Friday, we didn't have a project," he said. "We kept plowing ahead during the whole 2014, advancing our plans and approvals on the hope that we would be ready to begin should we receive the grant.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
THE BOOKS are mostly moved, the new store is open for business and the torch has been passed. Mount Airy's beloved Walk a Crooked Mile Books has a new owner, a new space and a whole new chapter ahead. It also has a new name: Mt. Airy Read & Eat, a welcoming spot at 7141 Germantown Ave. The independent bookstore, formerly located inside the historic Mount Airy train station, was supposed to close this month. Devoted patrons weren't happy about that. It wasn't a decision longtime owner Greg Williams came to easily.
NEWS
August 1, 2014
IF YOU MOVED to Philadelphia during the last, say, 20 years, you speak a different language than the rest of us who are natives and have been here a while. I include myself in the latter group because, sure, I was 6 weeks old when my parents moved back north from Baltimore, but 42 days does not devotion make. We wax poetic (or "paoh-edd-ig") about East River Drive. We remember that the other side with the great view of Boathouse Row used to be called West River Drive, proving for posterity that Quakers are much better at educating folk than surprising them.
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