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Train Station

NEWS
July 23, 2012 | By Tracie Mauriello, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
GETTYSBURG - Tourists trickle through the Gettysburg Train Station's burgundy door, some to escape the heat, others to pick up battlefield maps. Only a few come to trace Lincoln's path through here to deliver the two-minute speech that defined the Civil War and began to reunify a nation. When Walter Powell walks through, his eyes don't register the racks of picked-over tourism brochures or the weary travelers resting achy feet on 150-year-old benches. Rather, he sees what the station could be: a bustling railroad museum that gives visitors a fuller picture of the Civil War and draws tourists to downtown businesses.
NEWS
July 6, 2012
A shooting near the North Philadelphia train station Thursday morning left a teenager dead, authorities said. A boy in his late teens was shot in the chest shortly before noon on the 1400 block of West Glenwood Avenue at Broad Street underneath the overpass, police said. The victim was taken to Temple University Hospital, where he was pronounced dead about 12:25 p.m. His identity was not available Thursday night. - Sam Wood
NEWS
July 6, 2012 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A shooting near the North Philadelphia train station has left one teen dead and caused trains to temporarily bypass the station. A boy in his late teens was shot in the chest shortly before noon on the 1400 block of West Glenwood Avenue at Broad Street underneath the overpass, police said. The victim was taken to Temple University Hospital where he was pronounced dead at 12:23 p.m. Trains on SEPTA's Trenton Line were bypassing the station until further notice due to a police investigation, SEPTA officials said.
NEWS
June 1, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
A woman whose body was dumped in a wooded area near train tracks in East Germantown on Monday had been strangled, Philadelphia police said Thursday. She was identified as Candace Holmes, 27, of the 6700 block of North 17th Street in West Oak Lane. A passerby spotted the body wrapped and tied in bed sheets about 5:30 p.m. Monday in a wooded section on Rufe Street near Collum Street, a short walk from SEPTA's Wister train station. The woman had nothing on her feet but was dressed.
NEWS
May 13, 2012 | By Laura Chanoux, FOR THE INQUIRER
In July 2010, my boyfriend Eric and I were five days into our first trip together. After two days in Marseille, France, we planned to take a train to Nice. From there, we'd fly to Rome. When we got to the train station, Eric asked a conductor (in French!) which train went to Nice. We boarded, settled into comfortable seats, and pulled out our books for the trip. As we pulled away from the platform, the conductor began announcing the stops. After a minute, I realized the cities were going the wrong direction.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
It's not the image nor the label one often associates with dedicated doctors. But on Sunday afternoon, "Rockin' Docs" will be rockin' out at the Electric Factory, complete with special effects and pretty impressive music sets offered by five bands. The unusual element: Most of the rockers are area physicians. For Drs. Jeremy Jaffe and Ken Einhorn, founders of Rockin' Docs for Diabetes Cure, this second annual event has deep personal significance. Their event's purpose is to raise both awareness and funds for Type 1 (juvenile diabetes)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
He is 80 years old now, but Paul Beller still remembers his interrupted childhood in Vienna. He remembers the good times, when his father and grandfather owned a plywood business and he went to school with the other neighborhood children. And then everything changed in 1938, when the Nazis marched into his city. "They took the business away from my father and I wasn't allowed to go to school with non-Jewish children," said Beller, a retired federal employee who now lives in Monroe Township, Gloucester County.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
NJ Transit's modern train station in Hamilton, just north of Trenton, is a favorite with commuters, with lots of parking and easy access to I-295. The station is also a favorite among death-seekers. Five people in two years have been killed by trains there, all apparent suicides. Amtrak trains, which don't stop at Hamilton, speed by the station at up to 135 m.p.h. on their way to and from New York City. In each of the five Hamilton deaths, the victims stood or jumped in front of Amtrak trains.
NEWS
January 22, 2012 | By Ali Kotarumalos, Associated Press
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Indonesia has gone to imaginative extremes to try to stop commuters from illegally riding the roofs of trains - hosing down the scofflaws with red paint, threatening them with dogs, and appealing for help from religious leaders. Now the authorities have an intimidating and possibly even deadly new tactic: suspending rows of grapefruit-size concrete balls to rake over the top of trains as they pull out of stations, or when they go through rail crossings. Authorities hope the balls - which could deliver serious blows to the head - will be enough to deter defiant roof riders.
NEWS
December 29, 2011
PHILADELPHIA Tasco DROPs the bomb City Councilwoman Marian Tasco will retire tomorrow, collect a $478,057 pension payment, then return to work Monday after she is sworn in to serve her seventh term. Francis Bielli, executive director of the city's Board of Pensions and Retirement, said that he was recently notified of when Tasco, who is enrolled in the controversial Deferred Retirement Option Plan (DROP), would retire. Tasco did not respond to requests for comment.
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