CollectionsTrans Fats
IN THE NEWS

Trans Fats

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2002 | By ALTHEA ZANECOSKY For the Daily News
Last month in part of a lengthy report setting new eating and exercise goals, the National Academy of Sciences recommended that Americans reduce their consumption of a type of fat called trans fat. Trans fat has been linked to higher rates of heart disease and makes up about 4 percent of the fat in Americans' diets. That same week, McDonald's announced that it would be switching to a new cooking oil to lower the amount of harmful trans fat in its popular french fries. Some fast-food critics and nutrition experts applauded McDonald's for trying to improve the health of their customers.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2006 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three-quarters of Herr's products have never had trans fats. The other 25 percent of the Chester County company's products - such as cheese curls - have only negligible amounts, company president Ed Herr said yesterday. But that doesn't mean Herr Foods Inc. is sitting still. "With the attention it's getting, we're continuing to explore just getting rid of them altogether," Herr said. Since January, packaged-food companies have had to list trans fats - created when hydrogen is added to vegetable oils to make them more stable - on the nutrition-facts panel.
NEWS
September 16, 2002 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The nation's food industry is about to get an oil change. Makers of fast foods and packaged foods are looking for ways to reduce trans fats - oils that can boost consumers' "bad" cholesterol levels. And the federal government is readying regulations that will require nutrition labels to include the amount of trans fats. The movement to reduce the amount of trans fats picked up speed this month when McDonald's announced plans to cut the amount in its fried-food items. Its french fries will contain almost 50 percent less.
NEWS
November 9, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying it has determined that trans fats are not safe for use in food, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday announced steps that would virtually eliminate the heart-clogging ingredient, which many companies have already phased out of their food products. Americans' consumption of trans fats has declined sharply over the last two decades, but the independent Institute of Medicine has concluded there is no safe level, and no health benefits. "Further reduction of trans fat in the American diet could prevent an additional 20,000 heart attacks and 7,000 deaths from heart disease each year," said FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg.
NEWS
June 1, 2007 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dough isn't the only thing rising in Philadelphia's bakeries. Several bakers are fuming over the city's decision to ban trans fats, saying it's no small matter to tweak a cake or cookie recipe with a substitute ingredient, especially a recipe that dates back generations. "My grandfather passed away a couple of years ago, I'm glad he's not alive to witness this," said Mark Stock, a fourth-generation owner of Stock's Bakery in Port Richmond. Stock's pound cake, he says, isn't any old pound cake.
NEWS
September 3, 2007 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was the dawn of a new era of trans-fat-free foods in Philadelphia yesterday, and many diners were none too happy. Some were spitting mad. "This is exactly the sort of issue that the city should not be meddling in, what you put in your mouth," said Jim Reed, 52, a logistics manager, as he sat outside Rembrandt's restaurant in Fairmount, basking in the late-summer sun. "There are other issues that the City Council ought to be involved in...
NEWS
March 15, 2007 | By Jim Flanigan
When Philadelphia's City Council and Mayor Street agreed to begin banning artificial trans fats in restaurant food in September, they showed no brotherly love for the city's 3,000 restaurants. The law is likely to force restaurants into some bad choices, and will cause the city to overregulate some of its smallest businesses. If Council had taken the time to learn, it would know that artificial trans fats already are on their way out of restaurants. From farms to manufacturers, from distributors to restaurants, the entire food chain is involved in the effort.
NEWS
October 11, 2007 | By Jeff Shields, Inquirer Staff Writer
Artificial trans fats, the new dietary demon and subject of a ban in Philadelphia, found friends yesterday in generations of neighborhood bakers who convinced a City Council committee that it should keep their tradition alive. The Committee on Public Health yesterday endorsed a bill, sponsored by Councilwoman Joan Krajewski, that would exempt neighborhood bakeries from the citywide trans-fats ban, which was to begin for them in January. The full Council could vote on it in two weeks.
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Turns out it's possible to make a fast-food lunch a bit healthier even without skipping the fries. New York City now has hard evidence that its ban on trans fat in restaurant food made a meaningful dent in people's consumption of the artery clogger and wasn't just replaced with another bad fat. The findings published Tuesday have implications beyond heart health, suggesting another strategy to curb the nation's obesity epidemic fueled...
BUSINESS
October 31, 2006 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
KFC Corp., the home of Colonel Sanders' Kentucky-fried chicken, will start using oil without trans fatty acids in the United States after a lawsuit and health experts claimed its food raises the risk of heart disease. The Louisville, Ky., company said yesterday that it was phasing out trans fats in cooking its Original Recipe and Extra Crispy fried chicken, Potato Wedges and other menu items but has not found a good alternative yet for its biscuits. Health experts say trans fats raise levels of cholesterol, which clogs arteries and contributes to heart disease.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 1, 2014
IN THESE DAYS of growing income inequality, the rich get richer and the poor get . . . diabetes. And heart disease. And cancer. A recent study of the eating habits of 29,124 Americans by the Harvard School of Public Health verified a widening "food gap" between the poor and everyone else. While people at higher income levels are eating more healthy foods than they were 12 years ago, low-income Americans are lagging even farther behind. Poor eating habits, and the obesity that often results, are strongly tied to a host of chronic (and expensive to treat)
NEWS
November 9, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying it has determined that trans fats are not safe for use in food, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday announced steps that would virtually eliminate the heart-clogging ingredient, which many companies have already phased out of their food products. Americans' consumption of trans fats has declined sharply over the last two decades, but the independent Institute of Medicine has concluded there is no safe level, and no health benefits. "Further reduction of trans fat in the American diet could prevent an additional 20,000 heart attacks and 7,000 deaths from heart disease each year," said FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg.
FOOD
March 15, 2013 | By Alison Ladman, Associated Press
This classic Irish quick bread - no rising time needed - lends itself to numerous creative variations. Traditional recipes often call for nothing but flour, salt, baking soda and buttermilk or yogurt. Currants are a common addition, but that's just the start. Any number of seeds, nuts, chopped dried fruit, and even chocolate can be added. For our take on soda bread, we decided to have a little of everything. We started with a rich take on the classic recipe, studding it with currants and caraway seeds.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer, mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
You think you know what a heart-healthy diet looks like: Lots of vegetables. Lots of fruit. Lots of color and fiber. Less sodium. Very little saturated fat. Even less trans fat. But you also know something else: Heart-healthy eating is much easier said than done. Here, five local experts show us a dozen ways to simplify your everyday eating, to put you and your heart on the path to a long, lovely life together. Portion control Counting calories is hard. Limiting portions is easier.
NEWS
December 17, 2012 | By Beth Wallace, For The Inquirer
In my quest to make pediatric nutrition less confusing for parents, I know you sometimes want to cut through all of the mumbo-jumbo and know what not to feed your family. So, in a very fun experiment, I asked 20 well-respected child-nutrition experts what foods they refuse to give their own children, ranging from 18 months to 20 years old. Here are the top 10 foods they won't serve: 1. Sugar-sweetened beverages. This was the overwhelming No. 1 on every list and it includes soda, juice drinks, iced tea, lemonade, and powdered drink mixes.
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | By Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
ATLANTA - Finally some good news about cholesterol and children: A big government study shows that in the last decade, the proportion of children who have high cholesterol has fallen. The results are surprising, given that the childhood obesity rate did not budge. How can that be? Some experts think that while most children might not be eating less or exercising more, they may be getting fewer trans fats. That's because the artery-clogging ingredient has been removed or reduced in many processed or fried foods.
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Turns out it's possible to make a fast-food lunch a bit healthier even without skipping the fries. New York City now has hard evidence that its ban on trans fat in restaurant food made a meaningful dent in people's consumption of the artery clogger and wasn't just replaced with another bad fat. The findings published Tuesday have implications beyond heart health, suggesting another strategy to curb the nation's obesity epidemic fueled...
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Peter Ubel
New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's brave and provocative new plan to prohibit sales of large soft drinks would seem to promote public health at minimal cost to residents. It looks like the kind of tough regulatory action the nation needs to combat an obesity epidemic that could make this generation of schoolchildren the first in centuries to have a shorter average life span than their parents.   As a physician who has written extensively about the unconscious forces that cause people to overeat, I believe governments should pursue bold initiatives to fight obesity.
NEWS
May 3, 2012 | By J.M. Hirsch ASSOCIATED PRESS
It's a beet, minus the root. Chard is a relative of the beet, but puts its energy into producing tender leaves and crunchy stalks instead of its root. Generally, any flavor that works well with spinach will partner with chard: butter, lemon, cream, garlic, shallots and vinaigrette. Try it in this easy quiche. Rainbow Chard, Bacon and Brie Quiche Makes 6 servings 1 prepared uncooked pie crust 8 ounces bacon, cut into small chunks 1 small yellow onion, diced 6 cups chopped rainbow chard (about ?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2011 | By Maria Zankey, mankeym@phillynews.com 215-854-5444
DON'T FEEL too guilty as you crack open that coconut-cream Easter egg, though you might want to save half for later. After nearly two decades of being considered "forbidden" in a healthy diet, coconut and products made with it are being viewed in a new light by some scientists, health nuts and chefs. Coconut - be it oil, meat, water or milk - has gone from being a cholesterol criminal to an antiviral, antimicrobial and antifungal "super food. " Monica Glass, dessert chef at 10 Arts Bistro & Lounge by Eric Ripert in the Ritz-Carlton, said she inadvertently stumbled upon coconut oil as a potential cooking fat when Googling cholesterol-friendly recipes about two years ago. "Coconut oil was showing up in a lot of gluten-free recipes," the West Chester native said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|