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Transit Fares

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BUSINESS
November 16, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
After losing the right to use the familiar TransitChek name for its commuter-benefits program, the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission on Wednesday unveiled a renamed program for Philadelphia-area commuters and employers. The program, which allows workers to deduct pretax dollars from their paychecks to purchase transit fares, will now be called RideECO. "The name is changing, but nothing administratively will change," said Stacy Bartels, manager of marketing and commuter services for DVRPC.
NEWS
June 1, 2003
This excerpt from the Pennsylvania Sunshine Act is presented for the benefit of the SEPTA board: "Secrecy in public affairs undermines the faith of the public in government and the public's effectiveness in fulfilling its role in a democratic society. " OK, the Sunshine Law may be the one Pennsylvania law that elected officials most love to break. But it is still the law. And it seems fairly clear. Government boards may meet behind closed doors only to discuss lawsuits against the agency, personnel matters or labor negotiations.
NEWS
March 27, 2010 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bus and train riders urged NJ Transit officials yesterday to scale back planned fare hikes and service cuts and to require motorists to share the pain through higher gas taxes. In a public hearing at Camden City Hall - one of 12 being held around the state this week - transit users said the proposed 25 percent increase in fares fell on those who could least afford it. "If you raise the fares too high, I don't know how I'll be able to keep my job," said Nancy Ingling, 49, of Lumberton.
NEWS
February 19, 2010 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Plans in New Jersey to cut service and drastically raise transit fares ran into sharp criticism at a legislative hearing yesterday, as the new boss of New Jersey Transit outlined Gov. Christie's plan to save money by reducing the state's transit subsidy. Lawmakers and transit advocates said bus and train passengers were being unfairly targeted while car and truck drivers were not being asked to share the financial pain. James Weinstein, executive director of NJ Transit, said that no decision had been made on how much to raise fares, but that the proposed hike would be "significant.
NEWS
March 31, 1989
It was no surprise that people were worked up at Tuesday's public hearing on SEPTA fare increases. It was surprising, however, that their outrage went beyond the predictable SEPTA-bashing and reflected a deeper understanding of the transit agency's financial plight. "No SEPTA fare increase," read one protest sign. "Casey has surplus money. Phila. riders don't. " Actually, there's no way that SEPTA can balance its budget without increasing fares. But what galls riders is that they are being asked to pay more, while the state, which is far from broke, balks at substantially increasing its commitment to SEPTA.
NEWS
March 22, 2010 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As New Jersey looks for ways to pay for highways and transit after the state's Transportation Trust Fund runs dry, it can expect to find pain at every turn. The possibilities, based on what other states have done, include higher taxes, new taxes, higher tolls, new tolls, and higher fees. Or maybe a combination of them all. The option that would raise the most money would be to no longer exempt motor fuels from New Jersey's sales tax, which would raise about $890 million a year.
NEWS
March 22, 2001
Just as there is no free lunch, there is no free ride. Riders of SEPTA's buses, trolleys and trains should keep that in mind as they react to this week's double dose of big news out of the regional transit agency: (1) There will be no strike in 2001, as there had been in 1998 and 1995, and myriad other times. (Hallelujah!) (2) Transit fares will go up. (Ouch!) The contract settlement reached between SEPTA and Transport Workers Union Local 234 will hike wages 10 percent-plus over three years.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1995 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
The folks who run the PATCO High-Speed Line that runs from Lindenwold, N.J., to Center City think it's time for a fare hike. There hasn't been one since 1983. PATCO riders pay less than passengers on comparable New Jersey Transit lines and a lot less than riders of SEPTA commuter trains. But New Jersey Gov. Christie Whitman thinks they pay enough. Stay tuned. At a meeting yesterday of the Delaware River Port Authority Board, Robert G. Schwab, PATCO's general manager, made a pitch for higher fares and parking- lot fees.
NEWS
January 23, 1986 | By Susan Caba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing above the Schuylkill Expressway for emphasis, Roger Tauss fired the first public salvo yesterday in this spring's contract negotiations between city bus drivers and SEPTA. Tauss, president of Transport Workers Union Local 234, blasted the transit agency for what he called an excessive rate of discipline, penurious pensions for bus drivers, and a budgetary process that puts too much money into the suburban commuter-rail system and not enough into Philadelphia's bus system.
NEWS
January 30, 1986 | By Susan Caba, Inquirer Staff Writer
The president of the Transport Workers' Union said the union would call for the breakup of SEPTA if a plan to cut transit fares by at least 10 cents in Philadelphia is rejected. Roger Tauss, president of TWU Local 234, which represents drivers and mechanics, presented a plan yesterday to shift $38.4 million in subsidies from the commuter rail system to the city transit division. He said the shift would provide for increased pension benefits for 5,000 TWU members and allow for a fare decrease.
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NEWS
April 4, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
New Jersey's transit agency is considering a fare hike to fill a revenue shortfall, its director told lawmakers Thursday. NJ Transit officials said they expected to propose a fare increase by the end of April, in light of a $60 million gap in next year's operating budget. Testifying before the Senate Budget Committee, executive director Veronique Hakim did not specify how much the agency might raise fares. But given the size of its last fare increase in 2010 - which averaged 22 percent - "any proposal we put on the table would have to be substantially less than that to be palatable," Hakim said.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
After losing the right to use the familiar TransitChek name for its commuter-benefits program, the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission on Wednesday unveiled a renamed program for Philadelphia-area commuters and employers. The program, which allows workers to deduct pretax dollars from their paychecks to purchase transit fares, will now be called RideECO. "The name is changing, but nothing administratively will change," said Stacy Bartels, manager of marketing and commuter services for DVRPC.
NEWS
March 27, 2010 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bus and train riders urged NJ Transit officials yesterday to scale back planned fare hikes and service cuts and to require motorists to share the pain through higher gas taxes. In a public hearing at Camden City Hall - one of 12 being held around the state this week - transit users said the proposed 25 percent increase in fares fell on those who could least afford it. "If you raise the fares too high, I don't know how I'll be able to keep my job," said Nancy Ingling, 49, of Lumberton.
NEWS
March 22, 2010 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As New Jersey looks for ways to pay for highways and transit after the state's Transportation Trust Fund runs dry, it can expect to find pain at every turn. The possibilities, based on what other states have done, include higher taxes, new taxes, higher tolls, new tolls, and higher fees. Or maybe a combination of them all. The option that would raise the most money would be to no longer exempt motor fuels from New Jersey's sales tax, which would raise about $890 million a year.
NEWS
March 6, 2010 | By Paul Nussbaum and Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Higher fares. Fewer trains. Longer waits for buses. That's the future for NJ Transit riders, as the agency yesterday announced 25 percent fare hikes and widespread service cuts to help address a $300 million budget shortfall. The measures, which could take effect May 1, would increase a one-zone bus ride to $1.70 from the current $1.35. The cost of a train ticket to New York City from the Hamilton station, near Trenton, would become $15, up from $12. What is now a $59 monthly bus pass would cost $74, and a monthly train pass that is currently $198 would be $248.
NEWS
February 28, 2010 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James Simpson, nominated to be New Jersey's transportation commissioner, faces a daunting list of challenges: a nearly bankrupt transportation fund, the worst roads in the nation, and higher bus and transit fares. Simpson, a former trucker who led the Federal Transit Administration in the second Bush administration, is scheduled for a confirmation hearing tomorrow before the state Senate's Judiciary Committee. He'll face tough questions about how to solve problems inherited from his predecessors, with his options limited by Gov. Christie's rejection of any increases in gas taxes or highway tolls.
NEWS
February 19, 2010 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Plans in New Jersey to cut service and drastically raise transit fares ran into sharp criticism at a legislative hearing yesterday, as the new boss of New Jersey Transit outlined Gov. Christie's plan to save money by reducing the state's transit subsidy. Lawmakers and transit advocates said bus and train passengers were being unfairly targeted while car and truck drivers were not being asked to share the financial pain. James Weinstein, executive director of NJ Transit, said that no decision had been made on how much to raise fares, but that the proposed hike would be "significant.
NEWS
November 26, 2007
PATCO riders soon will board their trains simply by waving a new high-tech fare card at a turnstile censor. As for SEPTA rail passengers, they're likely to keep wagging their fingers in anger over onboard ticket surcharges. Those charges stem, in part, from the fact that the region's biggest transit agency has long delayed its switch to a "smart card" fare. At least, SEPTA is offering riders a credit now if they buy a return-trip ticket. But the smart cards are better news for PATCO riders.
NEWS
June 1, 2003
This excerpt from the Pennsylvania Sunshine Act is presented for the benefit of the SEPTA board: "Secrecy in public affairs undermines the faith of the public in government and the public's effectiveness in fulfilling its role in a democratic society. " OK, the Sunshine Law may be the one Pennsylvania law that elected officials most love to break. But it is still the law. And it seems fairly clear. Government boards may meet behind closed doors only to discuss lawsuits against the agency, personnel matters or labor negotiations.
NEWS
January 7, 2002
Basic economics: You cannot run a business in which expenses consistently exceed income. Bookkeeping gymnastics may delay the reckoning, but eventually it comes. Without a doubt, New Jersey Transit has been underfunded and overextended. But officials have made bad matters worse by imprudently juggling finances since the 1990s. And, so, that day of reckoning has come. NJ Transit faces a $3.1 billion deficit over the next five years. That's why its board of directors will likely support a 10 percent average rate increase - the first since 1991 - at a meeting set for today in Newark.
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