CollectionsTransit Police
IN THE NEWS

Transit Police

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
April 26, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SEPTA's board of directors approved a new contract Thursday for the agency's transit police. The police union, which staged a nine-day strike last month, ratified the contract April 5. Under the agreement, each of the 210 members of the Fraternal Order of Transit Police will receive a $1,250 bonus immediately and a 12 percent increase in pay over four years. The agreement also includes small increases in longevity pay and clothing allowances, and doubles the death benefit to $500,000 for any officer killed in the line of duty.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | By Allison Steele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SEPTA transit police officers were back at the bargaining table late Thursday afternoon, a few hours after the union's strike passed the 24-hour mark. Union spokesman Anthony Ingargiola confirmed the meeting was taking place, but would not say where. As of 5:30 p.m., there was no word of any developments. Earlier Thursday, SEPTA spokeswoman Jerri Williams had expressed hope that the two sides would reopen negotiations. "We're sitting at the negotiation table, waiting," she said.
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | By Dan Moberger, Inquirer Staff Writer
Subway and bus riders said they were glad to see the return of SEPTA's transit police Saturday after a nine-day strike. Negotiators for SEPTA and the Fraternal Order of Transit Police reached a tentative agreement Friday night, and officers returned to work at midnight. Katie Del Russo, 18, of South Philadelphia, uses the subway and SEPTA buses fairly often. "When I come down here and I see the cops, it makes me feel better," she said while waiting for a Broad Street subway train to the Flyers game Saturday.
NEWS
June 7, 2008 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SEPTA transit police moved a step closer to a strike yesterday as the agency rejected its police union's request for binding arbitration to end a long-running contract dispute. Transit police are calling for an emergency membership meeting today, and a strike is possible within a week to 10 days, police said. If transit police strike, SEPTA will rely on private security guards and Philadelphia police officers to protect riders, agency officials said. The approximately 200 police officers who patrol the Broad Street and Market-Frankford Lines want the same pay as officers in the Philadelphia Police Department, who start at about $39,000 a year.
NEWS
January 8, 1998 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As an officer with the University of Pennsylvania's police force, Catherine Natsu Lanning has made arrests, run for blocks chasing down suspects, and won commendations for her work patrolling high-crime sections of the West Philadelphia campus. She was valedictorian in her class at Montgomery County Community College's police academy and passed Pennsylvania's academic and physical requirements for state and local police officers. But she couldn't make the grade in 1993 when she applied for a job with SEPTA's transit police force because she failed to run 1.5 miles in less than 12 minutes.
NEWS
March 31, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Striking transit police began returning to their SEPTA posts Friday night after reaching a tentative settlement to end their nine-day strike earlier in the evening. Details of the settlement were not immediately disclosed, but the police can expect an 11.5 percent salary increase over five years and a $1,250 bonus upon ratification, based on the pattern contract approved by other SEPTA unions. The sticking point in the strike had been a 35-cent-an-hour difference in "certification" pay between the union's demand and SEPTA's offer.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
I JUST SHOT a man. I may have shot him three times, I can't remember. Everything happened so fast. The call came in as a "domestic," one of the most dangerous calls for law-enforcement officers, and by the looks of this one, I get why. The woman who called police is in a panic. The man is stumbling in and out of the kitchen with a bottle of booze. Everyone's talking at once. I'm confused. "He just got out of jail. He's been drinking. He's already hit me, and he has a gun," she says.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
AS THEIR STRIKE began its second full day Thursday afternoon, SEPTA's 219 unionized transit police, who had rallied heartily at City Hall Station the previous night, were invisible there. No pickets. No presence. But behind the scenes, intermediaries for SEPTA and the striking Fraternal Order of Transit Police worked to get both sides back to the bargaining table. By Thursday night, they had succeeded. All day long, a hastily assembled force of armed, uniformed SEPTA transit police supervisors, city cops and unarmed private security guards kept the peace on the bustling City Hall concourse and station platforms.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
A woman was attacked and slashed with a box cutter Wednesday morning while walking into a El stop in Frankford, SEPTA officials said. Transit police were still searching for the suspect in the case Wednesday afternoon, said SEPTA Police Chief Thomas Nestel III. The attack happened at 9:27 a.m., officials said, when a woman tried to enter the Margaret-Orthodox station of the Market-Frankford Line and got into an argument with a man inside the station....
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
I JUST SHOT a man. I may have shot him three times, I can't remember. Everything happened so fast. The call came in as a "domestic," one of the most dangerous calls for law-enforcement officers, and by the looks of this one, I get why. The woman who called police is in a panic. The man is stumbling in and out of the kitchen with a bottle of booze. Everyone's talking at once. I'm confused. "He just got out of jail. He's been drinking. He's already hit me, and he has a gun," she says.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
SARAH-ASHLEY Andrews spread peace yesterday in the form of water bottles and Tastykake Krimpets. She, along with about a dozen volunteers, staged a "takeover" of the corner of 15th and Market streets, handing out the complimentary refreshments to passers-by as they ducked into the nearby SEPTA concourse. "We want to promote peace, to show these people positive role models," said Andrews, the founder of Dare 2 Hope, a grass-roots organization that promotes suicide prevention and awareness.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
A TREMBLING VOICE on a cellphone video can be heard pleading, "Let me get out of this, man," as he is pummeled with fists on a moving cable car Friday night. "Slide out, yo - they callin' the cops," a voice says on the video. That's when the trolley comes to a stop and everybody exits. SEPTA police are investigating the cause of - and perpetrators behind - a vicious brawl involving as many as eight teens on a westbound trolley in Parkside that had departed Center City about 11:30 p.m. Two of the teens were stomped, kicked, punched and pounded as stunned passengers looked on. In the video, filmed by an onlooker, two teens shield their faces from flying fists while voices in the background are laughing and jeering at the spectacle.
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
THIS KID really wanted to get home from school. A 16-year-old boy went ballistic Monday afternoon at the Erie-Torresdale stop of SEPTA's Market-Frankford El, fighting with the agency's Transit Police, threatening to punch a cashier and then hopping onto the roof of a moving train. "This was bizarre behavior, something we've never seen before," Transit Police Inspector Steven Harold said yesterday. "Obviously, this juvenile has mental issues, and is extremely lucky that he didn't hurt someone or himself.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IF YOU see a SEPTA Transit Police officer in the next few days, be sure to smile - you may be on camera. This week, the force is beginning a trial run of body-mounted cameras on its officers, an initiative officials have had their eyes on for months. "It improves public trust," SEPTA Transit Police Chief Thomas Nestel said. "If people know police have cameras on uniform, they have more faith that officers are acting properly. " Nestel's a self-admitted fan of technology - he boasts more than 2,000 Twitter followers - and says the cameras can be a valuable tool for the force.
NEWS
May 9, 2014
Introduced by an article in the Atlantic more than three decades ago and embraced in New York a few years later, the "broken windows" theory isn't cutting-edge criminology. But the SEPTA police force's much more recent adoption of the approach is as auspicious as it is belated. The theory holds that tolerance of minor crimes such as vandalism contributes to more general and serious disorder. Cracking down on petty violations should therefore pay public-safety dividends that go beyond the nuisances themselves.
NEWS
November 16, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA transit police released dramatic video footage Thursday of a man exiting a bus and pulling a gun on another rider. Police say they have located the gunman. Their challenge now is finding his victim. Transit Police Chief Thomas Nestel says there is likely enough evidence to charge the gunman with assault and related offenses. But he believes the victim's statement could help strengthen the case. "This is our last-ditch attempt at locating him," Nestel said Thursday. The incident occurred about 10:30 a.m. on Sept.
NEWS
November 5, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom Nestel, the top cop at SEPTA, is a natural on Twitter. "Rider complained about loud radio player on Rt66 each night. Tonight, undercover Transit Police pulled the cord on bus DJ," he tweeted on Oct. 23, adding the hash tag #silenceisgolden. It's that dash of snark that makes some of his Twitter updates sparkle. "Spiderman 'forgot' to pay at 46th St. He's paying now. . .#cheesesandwich. Can't outrun the radio and the cameras :-)" Nestel tweeted two days later, adding a photo of the offender's Spider-Man-style hoodie.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|