CollectionsTransit System
IN THE NEWS

Transit System

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 18, 1988
SEPTA's new general manager, Louis J. Gambaccini, has made an expensive but responsible decision not to fight handicapped riders in their quest for access to the subway system. Mr. Gambaccini ended SEPTA's losing fight to avoid putting elevators in major subway stations and agreed to an initial $1.9 million investment in elevators for the Olney station on the Broad Street line. "It's the right thing to do," he said. "And besides, under the law we really don't have any recourse.
NEWS
August 17, 2000
Imagine the terror Drexel University student Shagoftah Rahman felt when - sitting alone on a Market-Frankford El platform near 30th Street Station - she was stabbed in the neck by a man wielding a 13-inch butcher knife. "He didn't say a word," said the chemical engineering major, miraculously alive to tell her horror tale. "He jabbed that thing into my neck and was cutting away . . . He didn't want money. He just wanted to cut my neck. " One of the most chilling facts about the incident on Monday was the time it occurred: At 1 p.m. Coming less than a month after Amtrak police shot to death a deranged man waving a metal chair at 30th Street Station's main concourse, the incident may well raise new fears among commuters that the station - long a magnet for the homeless and/or mentally ill - is a mortally dangerous place.
NEWS
January 23, 1992 | by Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writer
SEPTA says its cops are done playing Mr. Nice Guy to commuting cigarette smokers. You know who you are. The rail cops might have given you a warning within the last 30 days, telling you that smoking is now so verboten that SEPTA wants to make sure everybody knows the consequences before the real citations come out: a top fine of $300 and 10 days in jail. So don't be surprised if you get a nasty greeting when you light a butt at an elevated station. Or a bus terminal. Or an underground subway station.
NEWS
December 3, 1990
We gave a call last week to Robert Kiley, who just resigned after seven years as head of New York City's Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Mr. Kiley successfully put together a 10-year, $16 billion plan to save mass transit in New York, so we figured he might have some insight in how to rescue Philadelphia's transit system, which is badly in need of a large infusion of money for rebuilding. (Remember, mass transit is that rare government problem that can be solved by throwing money at it.)
NEWS
December 10, 1990 | By NEIL PETERSON
As executive director of the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission, I'd like to share a secret with the citizens of the Philadelphia area: Your public transportation system, SEPTA, is the envy of transit managers around the country. The network that is in place serves a metropolitan area of five counties and more than five million people in a way that the rest of us dream about. I am aware of the serious problems SEPTA faces, and I am aware that many would like more service or better service or different service.
NEWS
July 24, 2006 | By Martin D. Hull
The Philadelphia region's densely developed, human-scale communities strung out along public transportation lines are the very model of smart growth that many regions wish they could replicate. It makes us one of the country's most desirable places to live. The success of this growth pattern, however, relies on a first-class public transportation system. And one of the last vestiges of our region's old defeatist attitude is still strongly ingrained in our approach to transportation.
NEWS
January 9, 1987
Extending the transit system to the far Northeast up the Boulevard could be quite simply done, in a much shorter time and at half the cost. There would be no need for a messy excavation. Let's do what the Japanese and Europeans have done: Build an economical, above-ground monorail system. H. Harry Silverman Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 14, 2008
Local anti-crime activists and I have been coordinating crime reduction programs with city and SEPTA police officials for more than 33 years, targeting many of the youth-related and other crime problems that plague SEPTA throughout the transit system. It was a true tragedy that occurred at 13th and Market, but not at all uncommon in neighborhoods of color and poverty who experience this type of crime daily. I and other activists have patrolled the SEPTA train system daily for more than 33 years, and over those many years have seen much improvement by city and SEPTA police officials with regards to crime reduction on the transit system.
NEWS
May 22, 2004 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Transit officials have proposed banning photography on New York City's subways and buses to deter terrorist surveillance of the nation's largest mass-transit system. Mayor Michael Bloomberg says he opposes a ban. City officials have paid increasing attention to transit security after the March 11 commuter-train bombings in Spain and ahead of this summer's Republican National Convention in New York. The city transit system has more than seven million daily riders. New York City Transit, the division of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority that runs the subways, the buses and the Staten Island Railway, said the proposed ban on photography and videotaping would not apply to journalists with valid ID cards or to people who obtained written permission.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 30, 2015
When will SEPTA Key be available?   According to the transit agency, the card will be available as a replacement for weekly and monthly passes by the end of March, but will not have full functionality until the end of the summer. What will it do?   It will pay for rides on the subway, buses, and trolleys. It will take the place of every fare type on the city's transit system, except Regional Rail. It can be used as a single-ride card and can be replenished at kiosks and online, or, with some personalized versions of the card, can be linked directly to a bank account and draw from that automatically.
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
WHEN RONALD Bryant retired from the Philadelphia Police Department after 28 years, he didn't want to be a greeter at Walmart or be stacking boxes at a grocery store. He wanted to do what he knows best: protect and serve. Last month Bryant, 55, joined the SEPTA Transit Police as a member of the department's second batch of "lateral transfers" - trained law-enforcement officials who swap gigs at other departments for a chance to watch over the city's mass-transit system - that the agency is trying to recruit.
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writers
SEPTA's efforts to block city bus ads proclaiming "Jew Hatred: It's in the Quran" violate free-speech protections and should be halted, a federal judge has found. In a case that grappled with basic First Amendment issues over disparaging advertising, District Judge Mitchell S. Goldberg ruled Wednesday that SEPTA had inconsistently run public-issue ads from other organizations, and cleared the way for a private group's ad that seeks to end U.S. aid to Islamic countries using a provocative headline and a photograph of Adolf Hitler meeting with an Arab leader.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
MICHAEL, a Frankford teen, is a poster boy for all the wrong reasons. Last year, Michael - a pseudonym, because most of his offenses were committed as a juvenile - was cited 15 times in six months for hopping onto a SEPTA train without paying, law-enforcement sources said. It got so bad, one SEPTA Transit Police officer told the Daily News , that the cashiers at his most frequently visited stations began to recognize him and would tip off police before he even approached their windows.
NEWS
June 15, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a growing prospect of a SEPTA Regional Rail strike, commuters and employers are scrambling to make other plans for getting to work. About 60,000 people in the region make 126,000 train trips a day, on average. Many of those riders are likely to take cars onto already crowded rush-hour highways or squeeze aboard packed buses and subways. Some major Center City employers are encouraging employees to work flexible hours or from home, if their jobs permit. Carpooling, employer shuttle buses from distant parking lots, and temporary work from remote office branches are other stopgap plans.
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SEPTA's largest labor union has called for early negotiations to reduce the prospects for a transit strike next year. Transport Workers Local 234, which represents 5,100 bus drivers, subway and trolley operators and mechanics, sent a letter to SEPTA management requesting an exchange of contract proposals by June and face-to-face bargaining by August. The TWU's current contract expires March 14, 2014. The union went on strike in Nov., 2009, shutting down bus, subway and trolley service for six days.
NEWS
February 27, 2013
SEPTA won the 2012 transit Oscar - the American Public Transportation Association (APTA) award for Outstanding Public Transportation System in a major metropolitan area. APTA cited these accomplishments: * $191 million in federal-stimulus-funded projects - $71.2 million for rehabbing 16 transit and railroad stations (including Spring Garden and Girard stations), $61.1 million for repairing/rebuilding tracks and bridges, $23.7 million for communications and signal systems and $20.5 million for new hybrid buses.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
"HONESTLY, I have no sense of time," admitted Wendy Smith Born, gears turning in an attempt to pinpoint precisely when her Metropolitan Bakery began working with upstart Point Breeze coffee roasters GreenStreet. Though the years might blend together slightly, there's no disputing how long she and James Barrett have been at it. Two decades have passed since the bread bakers opened at 19th and Manning Streets in Center City. And on Monday, they debuted the adjoining Metropolitan Café, an addition that, despite its modern trappings, has been on the to-do list for 20 years.
NEWS
November 23, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
SEPTA MIGHT BE a vast and complicated transit operation, but it was John LaForce's playground. "For a transportation system as technically huge and complex as SEPTA, John was the one guy who knew how virtually everything worked - down to the last screw and circuit-breaker," said Richard C. Maloney, SEPTA's director of public affairs. "He had a photographic memory of the entire SEPTA infrastructure for the last 50 years - literally. " No wonder. John started working for Philadelphia's transit system in January 1954, when it was run by the Philadelphia Transportation Co. He started as a streetcar operator, and over the years drove buses, subways and trolleys, and became a specialist in signals, chief engineer of power and deputy chief engineering officer, his last title.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|