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Transplants

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NEWS
July 24, 1986 | By LEON TAYLOR, Daily News Staff Writer
Local health planners voted yesterday to disapprove a proposal to convert part of the nearly abandoned Pennhurst Center in Chester County into a 600-bed state-run nursing home for veterans. The board of directors of Health Systems Agency of Southeastern Pennsylvania Inc. also voted down a bid by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia to perform heart, liver and small intestine transplants. Such transplants already are being performed at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children. The Health Systems Agency includes representatives of medical and consumer organizations who make recommendations on health care in the area.
NEWS
July 12, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An existing drug dramatically reduced the most serious complications of bone marrow transplants, University of Pennsylvania researchers are reporting Thursday. The finding could someday point the way toward an entirely new method of preventing the body from "rejecting" transplanted organs of all kinds in the future, experts said. The work demonstrates a possible new approach to transplants of donated bone marrow, said Joseph Antin, a professor of medicine at Harvard, who was not involved with the study.
NEWS
July 13, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
An existing drug dramatically reduced the most serious complications of bone marrow transplants, University of Pennsylvania researchers are reporting Thursday. The finding could someday point the way toward an entirely new method of preventing the body from "rejecting" transplanted organs of all kinds in the future, experts said. The work demonstrates a possible new approach to transplants of donated bone marrow, said Joseph Antin, a professor of medicine at Harvard, who was not involved with the study.
NEWS
September 19, 2012 | By Karl Ritter, Associated Press
STOCKHOLM, Sweden - Two Swedish women are hoping to get pregnant after undergoing what doctors are calling the world's first mother-to-daughter uterus transplants. Specialists at the University of Goteborg said they performed the surgery over the weekend without complications but added that they won't consider it successful unless the women give birth to healthy children. "That's the best proof," said Michael Olausson, one of the surgeons. One of the unidentified women had her uterus removed many years ago because of cervical cancer, while the other was born without a womb.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
John E. Healey Jr., 66, a former Philadelphia physician who became a pioneer in liver transplants, died Monday at his residence in Bal Harbour, Fla. A recipient of numerous medical awards, Dr. Healey was head of experimental surgery at Houston's M.D. Anderson Hospital, where he directed the liver transplant experiments. He had been assistant director for planning at the Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami School of Medicine, medical director at the M.D. Anderson Hospital Rehabilitation Center and a consultant with the Houston Sports Association at the Astrodome and professor of anatomy at the University of Texas.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
It was fall 1993, and Henri Gutner's kidneys were continuing to fail. He was always tired, his complexion was green, and he was sleeping as much as 20 hours a day. "I had him maybe six hours a day when he was capable of doing anything," recalls his wife, Jeri. With his kidney function down to 8 percent, Gutner, then 43, was told he was facing dialysis and the inevitable disruption it would bring to his - and his wife's - life. "I said, 'There's no way I'm sending my young husband to dialysis,' " said Jeri Gutner, who is five years younger.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
PITTSBURGH - The national organization that manages organ transplants rejected making emergency rule changes yesterday for children younger than 12 who are waiting on lungs, but created a special appeal and review system to hear such cases. The executive committee of the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network held a teleconference, and many members voiced serious ethical and medical concerns about a recent federal judge's ruling. The meeting was prompted by the cases of 10-year-old Sarah Murnaghan of Newtown Square and 11-year-old Javier Acosta, two terminally ill children who are awaiting transplants at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 15, 2000 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
George J.M. Abouna of Radnor, a pioneer in organ transplants, recently was named a winner of the Albert Schweitzer gold medal for his lifetime contributions to medicine. The Polish Academy of Medicine awards the medal annually. Abouna, assistant director of transplant research at Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia, invented an artificial liver-support system for patients with liver failure, helping them stay alive until they receive transplants. The surgeon also is known for his work in salvaging kidneys that previously went unused for various reasons, such as the age or health of the donor.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2015 | By Sally McCabe, For The Inquirer
Get ready for the spring bugs.  High on everybody's watch list: the dreaded azalea scale. This looks like mealybugs, and sometimes like very tiny gray turtles. They don't move around much, but spend their time well-protected under waxy covers, sucking the juice from the branches and making the stems sticky with honeydew, which in turn encourages mold to grow, which is ultimately what kills the plant. But the young will be moving out from under cover in the next few weeks, and will be vulnerable to sprays of insecticidal soap.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2015 | By Sally McCabe, For The Inquirer
Get ready for the spring bugs.  High on everybody's watch list: the dreaded azalea scale. This looks like mealybugs, and sometimes like very tiny gray turtles. They don't move around much, but spend their time well-protected under waxy covers, sucking the juice from the branches and making the stems sticky with honeydew, which in turn encourages mold to grow, which is ultimately what kills the plant. But the young will be moving out from under cover in the next few weeks, and will be vulnerable to sprays of insecticidal soap.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2015 | By Sally McCabe, Inquirer Columnist
Clean out your old seed packets. Some seeds lose potency quickly (corn and spinach,) while others last for thousands of years (ask the dead pharaohs!). You want to get rid of anything older than five years; do this test to see whether others are still viable: Take 10 seeds from a pack, wrap them in a squeezed-out wet paper towel, and put them in a plastic bag, someplace warm but not hot. (We once made school kids wear them as necklaces, and they sprouted in a week; mine, of course, came up in three days!
NEWS
April 2, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jimmy Powell gave up. He had lived at the Gift of Life house in Philadelphia for 15 months, waiting for a lung-liver double transplant. The Alabama man arrived in Philadelphia with so much hope. The subject of an Inquirer story last year, he loved cooking barbecue for fellow residents. But waiting wore him out. He went home last fall. He's still on the transplant list, even though he's now 900 miles away. His University of Pennsylvania doctor made a rare exception for him. Powell's situation underscores a cruel reality - with so few donors, waits can be long.
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Scott Snyder hopes to thank the person whose pancreas and kidney have helped him stay alive for the last decade. "This is where I'll start to lose it," he says softly, pausing to regain his composure. "I think about my donor every day. " Snyder, 61, underwent double-organ transplant surgery at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden on Jan. 28, 2005. Since then, he has welcomed two grandchildren, retired after 30 years of teaching industrial arts at Eastern Regional High School, and partially restored the 19th-century Lindenwold home where we sit down to talk.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2015 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
In June, Jenny Rose Carey left Temple University-Ambler, where she had headed up the arboretum for almost a decade and taught horticulture for two years before that. She was eager to travel and write a book about early-20th-century gardens in Philadelphia, one of her many interests. And for a while, she did both, writing and visiting family in England (she's from Kent), and exploring the flora of the American West. Then, in December, surprising news: Carey would become the new director of Meadowbrook Farm in Abington Township, which J. Liddon Pennock Jr. bequeathed to the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society upon his death in 2003.
NEWS
December 1, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Rebecca Voltmer watches her classmates run through a dress rehearsal of You Can't Take It With You , the 1937 Pulitzer Prize-winning comedy. It's hell week - theater-speak for the days before opening night - and the Abington Senior High School cast is amped. Rebecca stands a curtain fold from being on stage, blond hair sliding over her shoulders, arms hugging her gray sweatshirt, smiling at a funny line. And then longing captures her face. She so wants to be out there, bathed in the footlights, exchanging lines with the other actors.
REAL_ESTATE
September 28, 2014 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
As you enter Gene and Bonnie Schwartz's 28th-floor condominium at the Murano, first impressions that the building's entrance and halls seem sparse and bare fade away - as intended by developer Peter Shaw, who wanted individual units to outshine the common areas. Instantly, a visitor to the Schwartz home is swept away by a 20-foot span of windows. In one corner, a large brass-and-wood telescope peers out on a view embracing Philadelphia International Airport and Citizens Bank Park and 30th Street Station, and everything between.
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Gale Scott, For The Inquirer
When Donald Johnson checked out of Hahnemann University Hospital on June 27, he and his family thought he was coming home to die. Johnson, 63, a Warminster resident and director of a municipal authority, had end-stage fatty liver disease and his kidneys had failed. He needed two organ transplants and had even considered going to Florida to increase his chances of getting help. He had good reason to be afraid. At the time, he was one of nearly 2,500 patients on liver transplant waiting lists in federal Region 2, which includes Pennsylvania and South Jersey.
NEWS
August 29, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two men connected to a Bucks County church were doing well after kidney transplant surgery at a Camden hospital Tuesday, according to a hospital spokeswoman. Rob Chifokoyo, 30, and Michael Wortell, 22, were in good condition Wednesday, said Carol Lynn Daley, director of marketing at Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital. Wortell, a member of Doylestown's Covenant Church, donated a kidney to Chifokoyo, a Zimbabwean mission partner of the church. A CaringBridge web page maintained by Chifokoyo's wife was updated Wednesday afternoon, saying that Wortell was able to walk and eat a meal during the day and that Chifokoyo would hopefully move from the intensive care unit into a regular room overnight.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
THE LIFE of a reporter can be pretty tough sometimes. For example, you try taking notes while participating in a swim meet. KYW Newsradio's Jim Melwert knows how hard it is firsthand. Last week, with a little help from the Gift of Life program, Melwert was in Houston reporting on and participating in the Transplant Games of America, an Olympics-style event for people who have donated or received an organ. In 2006, Melwert stepped in to give his aunt Jean DelMuto , who had polycystic kidney disease, one of his kidneys.
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