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NEWS
February 21, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
Jefferson Health announced Friday that it was taking the unusual step of voluntarily suspending heart transplant procedures for six to nine months while it begins a "significant redesign" of the program. "Every facet of healthcare delivery in our country is changing, and transplant care is no exception," Anne Docimo, chief medical officer of Jefferson Health, said in a statement. Asked why expansion would require a suspension, spokeswoman Jacqueline Kozloski said, "we are taking a timeout.
NEWS
July 24, 1986 | By LEON TAYLOR, Daily News Staff Writer
Local health planners voted yesterday to disapprove a proposal to convert part of the nearly abandoned Pennhurst Center in Chester County into a 600-bed state-run nursing home for veterans. The board of directors of Health Systems Agency of Southeastern Pennsylvania Inc. also voted down a bid by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia to perform heart, liver and small intestine transplants. Such transplants already are being performed at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children. The Health Systems Agency includes representatives of medical and consumer organizations who make recommendations on health care in the area.
NEWS
July 12, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An existing drug dramatically reduced the most serious complications of bone marrow transplants, University of Pennsylvania researchers are reporting Thursday. The finding could someday point the way toward an entirely new method of preventing the body from "rejecting" transplanted organs of all kinds in the future, experts said. The work demonstrates a possible new approach to transplants of donated bone marrow, said Joseph Antin, a professor of medicine at Harvard, who was not involved with the study.
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Hahnemann University Hospital last week became the second transplant center in the nation to receive permission to use organs from HIV-positive donors. The organs would be given only to patients who also are HIV-positive and have agreed to accept them. The transplants will be part of research that will carefully monitor both the transplant and the potentially deadly disease. Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore announced last month that it would be the first to offer HIV-positive organs to HIV-positive patients on its waiting list.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
It was fall 1993, and Henri Gutner's kidneys were continuing to fail. He was always tired, his complexion was green, and he was sleeping as much as 20 hours a day. "I had him maybe six hours a day when he was capable of doing anything," recalls his wife, Jeri. With his kidney function down to 8 percent, Gutner, then 43, was told he was facing dialysis and the inevitable disruption it would bring to his - and his wife's - life. "I said, 'There's no way I'm sending my young husband to dialysis,' " said Jeri Gutner, who is five years younger.
NEWS
July 13, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
An existing drug dramatically reduced the most serious complications of bone marrow transplants, University of Pennsylvania researchers are reporting Thursday. The finding could someday point the way toward an entirely new method of preventing the body from "rejecting" transplanted organs of all kinds in the future, experts said. The work demonstrates a possible new approach to transplants of donated bone marrow, said Joseph Antin, a professor of medicine at Harvard, who was not involved with the study.
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Surgeons at Johns Hopkins Medicine are planning to conduct experimental penis transplants in the hope of restoring urinary and sexual function to 60 wounded servicemen. Doctors at the Baltimore institution have been practicing on cadavers to prepare for their first patient, said a medical school spokeswoman. If the first round of transplants is successful, the procedure might be made available to men who have had cancer, and in gender reassignment surgery. Johns Hopkins has been approved to conduct transplants only on injured servicemen, said spokeswoman Taylor Graham.
NEWS
September 19, 2012 | By Karl Ritter, Associated Press
STOCKHOLM, Sweden - Two Swedish women are hoping to get pregnant after undergoing what doctors are calling the world's first mother-to-daughter uterus transplants. Specialists at the University of Goteborg said they performed the surgery over the weekend without complications but added that they won't consider it successful unless the women give birth to healthy children. "That's the best proof," said Michael Olausson, one of the surgeons. One of the unidentified women had her uterus removed many years ago because of cervical cancer, while the other was born without a womb.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
John E. Healey Jr., 66, a former Philadelphia physician who became a pioneer in liver transplants, died Monday at his residence in Bal Harbour, Fla. A recipient of numerous medical awards, Dr. Healey was head of experimental surgery at Houston's M.D. Anderson Hospital, where he directed the liver transplant experiments. He had been assistant director for planning at the Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami School of Medicine, medical director at the M.D. Anderson Hospital Rehabilitation Center and a consultant with the Houston Sports Association at the Astrodome and professor of anatomy at the University of Texas.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2016
Plant the last of your summer crops. Last call for tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, and sweet potato plants; and cucumber, squash, melons, and beans from seed. Here's how to plant midsummer: For transplants, soak the pot thoroughly in a bucket of water until no bubbles rise; dig a hole, fill hole with the rest of the water, and plant the plant. Water well to settle soil. For seeds, hoe a trench an inch or two deep, and fill it with water; give seeds the proper spacing in single or wide rows, and cover with soil three times as deep as the seeds are wide.
NEWS
June 5, 2016 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Erika Totten doesn't really remember the car crash. She recalls leaving her friend's house in Pennsylvania with her 2-year-old twins in the back of the car and heading back to her home in North Hanover, N.J. She vaguely remembers feeling a little confused, and a little lost. But the next thing she knew, she had run the car into a ditch, the police and ambulance arrived, and she was on her way to the hospital. No one was hurt. But the accident wasn't really a surprise. Totten had developed Type 1 diabetes at 21 after a severe case of mononucleosis that might have wiped out her insulin-producing beta cells.
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Surgeons at Johns Hopkins Medicine are planning to conduct experimental penis transplants in the hope of restoring urinary and sexual function to 60 wounded servicemen. Doctors at the Baltimore institution have been practicing on cadavers to prepare for their first patient, said a medical school spokeswoman. If the first round of transplants is successful, the procedure might be made available to men who have had cancer, and in gender reassignment surgery. Johns Hopkins has been approved to conduct transplants only on injured servicemen, said spokeswoman Taylor Graham.
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Hahnemann University Hospital last week became the second transplant center in the nation to receive permission to use organs from HIV-positive donors. The organs would be given only to patients who also are HIV-positive and have agreed to accept them. The transplants will be part of research that will carefully monitor both the transplant and the potentially deadly disease. Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore announced last month that it would be the first to offer HIV-positive organs to HIV-positive patients on its waiting list.
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
THIS IS ABOUT Bobby Rydell and a little girl, and the liver that binds them. And a lesson we too often forget. Let this be a small reminder. Assiah Phinisee has her eyes fixed on her video game and her ears on the conversation I'm having with her mom - you know, in case the pint-size cutie needs to clarify an important point or two. "I'm 7 1/2," she soon interjects, pausing for dramatic effect. "And I take my half really seriously. " Her mom, Rasheena, is sitting next to her and talking about the children's book she and Assiah have written, called I Am a Flower Pot Made for a Plant.
NEWS
February 21, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
Jefferson Health announced Friday that it was taking the unusual step of voluntarily suspending heart transplant procedures for six to nine months while it begins a "significant redesign" of the program. "Every facet of healthcare delivery in our country is changing, and transplant care is no exception," Anne Docimo, chief medical officer of Jefferson Health, said in a statement. Asked why expansion would require a suspension, spokeswoman Jacqueline Kozloski said, "we are taking a timeout.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Fox Chase Cancer Center has agreed to establish a bone-marrow transplant program with Universal Hospital in the United Arab Emirates, the two groups said Thursday. The new program will aim to provide care locally and regionally and include physician exchange programs, they said. Fox Chase, part of Temple University Health System, last week started seeing patients at a new outptient center for bone-marrow transplant patients at Jeanes Hospital. hbrubaker@phillynews.com 215-854-4651 @InqBrubaker
BUSINESS
January 19, 2016
Barbara Wadsworth , Main Line Health senior vice president and chief nursing officer, has been named to the governing board of the Gift of Life Donor Program. Since 1974, Gift of Life has coordinated more than 37,000 lifesaving organ transplants and more than 550,000 tissue transplants, and serves as the link between donors and patients awaiting transplants. The Center City Proprietors Association, a nonprofit member organization for small businesses, has elected the following officers: Linda Karp, president of Karp Marketing, president; Joe Wolf, owner of Lupine Retail Consulting, vice president; Eric Marzluf, a partner at Caesar Rivise P.C., secretary; and Suzette Mahoney, owner of the restaurant R2L, treasurer.
NEWS
December 3, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN NOBLE Khayee Lee saw the comely young woman in a Chinese market at 22nd and Lehigh, he knew she was the woman for him. There was just one problem. Noble was afflicted with crippling shyness. But love conquers all, as the saying goes, and love conquered Noble's shyness. "I got up my courage and spoke to her," he said. "She was so happy and smiling. I felt comfortable right away talking to her. " Noble had no way of knowing that the young woman, Alexis Sloan, had gained a kind of notoriety by being one of the five people who received the organs of a boxer, Francisco "Paco" Rodriguez, who died of head injuries in 2009 at age 25 after a bout at the Blue Horizon.
NEWS
November 8, 2015 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
Quinette Keys' large family rallied behind her when she learned she had cancer, but it wasn't at all clear they'd be able to save her. Diagnosed with acute lymphocytic leukemia in 2007, the Hamilton Square, N.J., woman waited anxiously as the staff at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital tested her relatives as possible matches for a life-saving stem cell transplant. Six brothers and even her fraternal twin sister all were ruled out. None had immune system protein markers close enough to those of the retired career Army soldier.
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