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NEWS
May 11, 2012 | Ronnie Polaneczky
IT WAS ONE of those letters that made me throw my hands in the air. "Please help my son get a kidney," the woman wrote in shaky script. "I am elderly, and he takes care of me. He has bad kidney disease and is getting sicker. He needs a kidney. " So, she asked: Could I find one for him? I was about to call and tell her that some things are beyond the powers of even the most sympathetic reporter, but then a letter landed on my desk. It was from an inmate in a Pennsylvania prison, and he had a request.
NEWS
July 21, 1999 | By Mary Otto, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The system that is used to distribute America's precious supply of donated organs should be reformed to increase the chances they will reach patients with the most urgent needs, the prestigious Institute of Medicine said yesterday. In a study calculated to resolve a running controversy over distribution of scarce organs, the institute said it would be fairer and more effective if organizations that harvest organs for smaller populations would set up sharing networks so they could reach wider pools of donors and recipients.
NEWS
April 3, 1992 | Compiled from Daily News wire service reports
SENATE VOTES TO LIFT BAN ON FETAL TISSUE RESEARCH The Senate yesterday lifted a federal moratorium on fetal tissue transplant research, with a majority that could override a threatened presidential veto. A bill covering the issue was approved, 87-10, and sent to a conference committee. The House passed a similar measure last July. The Reagan and Bush administrations imposed the moratorium on grounds that using the tissue of aborted fetuses for human transplants would cause an increase in the number of abortions in this country.
NEWS
November 24, 1994 | By Robert Zausner, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Gov. Casey, who has lived a year and half with a transplanted heart and liver, is likely to make one of his final acts in office the signing of legislation that would encourage organ donation in the state. The House and Senate unanimously passed the measure as part of a marathon session Tuesday. Casey is due to sign it next week. "This legislation is about people, about families, about hopes and dreams and those of us fortunate enough to receive a second chance in life," said Casey, who underwent life-saving transplant surgery on June 14, 1993.
NEWS
November 4, 1988 | Marc Schogol and including reports from the Health Gazette and Inquirer wire services
ALCOHOL I. Liver transplants for alcoholics with cirrhosis may help such patients stay off drink, largely because of the trauma of the operation. Of 35 alcoholics who received transplants after cirrhosis had damaged their livers, only two returned to heavy drinking, doctors at the University of Pittsburgh report in the Journal of the American Medical Association. They claim such results weaken the objection that giving an alcoholic a liver transplant is a futile gesture and a waste of an organ.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2015 | By Sally McCabe, Inquirer Columnist
Clean out your old seed packets. Some seeds lose potency quickly (corn and spinach,) while others last for thousands of years (ask the dead pharaohs!). You want to get rid of anything older than five years; do this test to see whether others are still viable: Take 10 seeds from a pack, wrap them in a squeezed-out wet paper towel, and put them in a plastic bag, someplace warm but not hot. (We once made school kids wear them as necklaces, and they sprouted in a week; mine, of course, came up in three days!
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2016
Plant the last of your summer crops. Last call for tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, and sweet potato plants; and cucumber, squash, melons, and beans from seed. Here's how to plant midsummer: For transplants, soak the pot thoroughly in a bucket of water until no bubbles rise; dig a hole, fill hole with the rest of the water, and plant the plant. Water well to settle soil. For seeds, hoe a trench an inch or two deep, and fill it with water; give seeds the proper spacing in single or wide rows, and cover with soil three times as deep as the seeds are wide.
NEWS
January 8, 2004 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Charlie Easton, 13, is an eighth grader who practices karate, and you wouldn't know from looking at him that six years ago he was dying. Despite two grueling rounds of chemotherapy, the Monmouth County boy was suffering a second relapse of leukemia. "Things were not looking very good," said his father, Charles. "But at least we knew we had a course of action. " That course was for doctors in Minnesota to transplant blood from his newborn brother's umbilical cord into Charlie.
NEWS
February 24, 2000
The word cloning immediately brings on a wave of emotionality. And if one speaks of human cloning, emotionality threatens to outstrip all bounds.. . . A somewhat different discussion concerns the possibility of someday producing tissues, organ parts and entire human organs.. . . [S]ome assert that this would be possible only through the production of individuals who would serve as "reservoirs" for organs, tissues or other transplants. . ..The fact is that this isn't true. Biologists are learning to produce animal tissues and organs from stem cells.
NEWS
October 9, 1994 | By Philip Pullella, REUTERS
Occasionally, an isolated event forces Italians to pull off the fast lane of life in their rich and beautiful but sometimes violent country and search their national soul. So it was with the killing of Nicholas Green, a 7-year-old boy from Bodega Bay, Calif., shot by bandits as his family drove along a desolate stretch of highway in Italy's southern Calabria region. It was not so much Nicholas' tragic death that jarred Italians, many of whom have come to accept violence as part of daily life.
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