CollectionsTransplants
IN THE NEWS

Transplants

NEWS
February 24, 2000
The word cloning immediately brings on a wave of emotionality. And if one speaks of human cloning, emotionality threatens to outstrip all bounds.. . . A somewhat different discussion concerns the possibility of someday producing tissues, organ parts and entire human organs.. . . [S]ome assert that this would be possible only through the production of individuals who would serve as "reservoirs" for organs, tissues or other transplants. . ..The fact is that this isn't true. Biologists are learning to produce animal tissues and organs from stem cells.
NEWS
October 9, 1994 | By Philip Pullella, REUTERS
Occasionally, an isolated event forces Italians to pull off the fast lane of life in their rich and beautiful but sometimes violent country and search their national soul. So it was with the killing of Nicholas Green, a 7-year-old boy from Bodega Bay, Calif., shot by bandits as his family drove along a desolate stretch of highway in Italy's southern Calabria region. It was not so much Nicholas' tragic death that jarred Italians, many of whom have come to accept violence as part of daily life.
NEWS
June 2, 1989 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
INFERTILITY TREATMENT. There's a new surgical technique that could help childless couples in which the man is infertile. The procedure involves extracting eggs from a woman and making a microscopic incision to help the immobile or malformed sperm enter. Tried at 12 infertility clinics worldwide, the only documented success has occurred at Reproductive Biology Associates of Atlanta, a private company working with the Emory University Medical School Center for Infertility. ANEMIA DRUG.
NEWS
August 17, 2011 | By Helen H. Shen, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Anne Peniazek decided to donate a kidney at age 65, the Narberth woman had bigger hopes than helping just one person. She and her surgeon James Lim of Lankenau Medical Center wanted to start a movement. Instead of arranging a typical kidney donation, Lim helped her start an open-ended kidney-donation chain, one of a small number in the United States. In December, Peniazek's kidney was given to Geoff Bowman of Philadelphia, who at age 32 had already had three transplants.
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | by Shaun D. Mullen, Daily News Staff Writer
A nation is held in thrall as the end of the O.J. Simpson trial finally draws near. But here in southwestern Colorado, where Sleeping Ute Mesa stands guard over the Montezuma Valley, the saga of Orenthal James Simpson seems to be less an attraction or distraction - and even more sordid - for reasons perhaps not easily understood by media-saturated East Coasters. Out here where the deer and the antelope still play and the mountains are picture-postcard perfect, at least until you get close enough to see the real- estate signs, there is a world weariness about O.J. and other headline- grabbing current events.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2008 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the midst of its campaign to convert into a for-profit company, Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey is threatening to cut two Pennsylvania hospital powerhouses out of its treatment networks. Horizon has notified subscribers that it is terminating contracts with Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania Health System when they expire in, respectively, November and December. Roughly 28,000 subscribers use those facilities. Horizon said subscribers would be charged out-of-network fees for using Children's and its facilities in New Jersey after March 11. Penn's three hospitals - Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Hospital and Penn Presbyterian Medical Center - would be out-of-network after April 11. The showdown is the latest in a series of disputes between insurers and hospitals or large physician groups over the last few months.
SPORTS
November 14, 2012
IT NEVER HAS been like this. We've all had our problems with Andy Reid's coaching over the years, have all wailed about his aversion to running the football and the time-management blunders and the red-zone stagnation and the smarter-than-you playcalling that too often blew up in his face. We've seen his teams start slow before, stumble in midseason, fall apart in the fourth quarter the way this group did in Sunday's 38-23 loss to Dallas. But there was always an adjustment, always a recoil and a second strike, always a December that looked so different from September it seemed that he, his coaches and his players had all undergone brain transplants.
NEWS
May 11, 2012 | Ronnie Polaneczky
IT WAS ONE of those letters that made me throw my hands in the air. "Please help my son get a kidney," the woman wrote in shaky script. "I am elderly, and he takes care of me. He has bad kidney disease and is getting sicker. He needs a kidney. " So, she asked: Could I find one for him? I was about to call and tell her that some things are beyond the powers of even the most sympathetic reporter, but then a letter landed on my desk. It was from an inmate in a Pennsylvania prison, and he had a request.
NEWS
July 30, 1996 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A radical but unproven new operation for heart failure, devised by a surgeon at a rural hospital in Brazil, has caught the attention of surgeons in Philadelphia and around the country who are eagerly beginning to test the technique on their patients. The operation, which involves cutting out a chunk of living heart muscle, was once considered so absurd that it didn't even merit discussion at medical conferences. "It sounded too good to be true," said Patrick McCarthy, a cardiac surgeon at the Cleveland Clinic, "in that here was this so-called miraculous operation being done in the jungle to cure people with end-stage heart failure so that they won't need transplants anymore.
NEWS
November 8, 1996
A PAINFUL LOOK AT WOMEN AND CHILDREN IN POVERTY I devoured each installment of the series on Passyunk Homes (Inquirer, Oct. 27-31), so relieved that someone had rendered a painful and realistic picture of the heartbreak and despair of women and children entangled in poverty. As a social worker for many years, I have met many folks like those in your series and have seen firsthand the incredible obstacles and difficulties they must endure just to survive. This constant and unrelenting struggle is tough on the adults, and absolutely devastating on the children.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|