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Transplants

NEWS
April 3, 1992 | Compiled from Daily News wire service reports
SENATE VOTES TO LIFT BAN ON FETAL TISSUE RESEARCH The Senate yesterday lifted a federal moratorium on fetal tissue transplant research, with a majority that could override a threatened presidential veto. A bill covering the issue was approved, 87-10, and sent to a conference committee. The House passed a similar measure last July. The Reagan and Bush administrations imposed the moratorium on grounds that using the tissue of aborted fetuses for human transplants would cause an increase in the number of abortions in this country.
NEWS
November 24, 1994 | By Robert Zausner, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Gov. Casey, who has lived a year and half with a transplanted heart and liver, is likely to make one of his final acts in office the signing of legislation that would encourage organ donation in the state. The House and Senate unanimously passed the measure as part of a marathon session Tuesday. Casey is due to sign it next week. "This legislation is about people, about families, about hopes and dreams and those of us fortunate enough to receive a second chance in life," said Casey, who underwent life-saving transplant surgery on June 14, 1993.
NEWS
November 4, 1988 | Marc Schogol and including reports from the Health Gazette and Inquirer wire services
ALCOHOL I. Liver transplants for alcoholics with cirrhosis may help such patients stay off drink, largely because of the trauma of the operation. Of 35 alcoholics who received transplants after cirrhosis had damaged their livers, only two returned to heavy drinking, doctors at the University of Pittsburgh report in the Journal of the American Medical Association. They claim such results weaken the objection that giving an alcoholic a liver transplant is a futile gesture and a waste of an organ.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2015 | By Sally McCabe, Inquirer Columnist
Clean out your old seed packets. Some seeds lose potency quickly (corn and spinach,) while others last for thousands of years (ask the dead pharaohs!). You want to get rid of anything older than five years; do this test to see whether others are still viable: Take 10 seeds from a pack, wrap them in a squeezed-out wet paper towel, and put them in a plastic bag, someplace warm but not hot. (We once made school kids wear them as necklaces, and they sprouted in a week; mine, of course, came up in three days!
NEWS
January 8, 2004 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Charlie Easton, 13, is an eighth grader who practices karate, and you wouldn't know from looking at him that six years ago he was dying. Despite two grueling rounds of chemotherapy, the Monmouth County boy was suffering a second relapse of leukemia. "Things were not looking very good," said his father, Charles. "But at least we knew we had a course of action. " That course was for doctors in Minnesota to transplant blood from his newborn brother's umbilical cord into Charlie.
NEWS
February 24, 2000
The word cloning immediately brings on a wave of emotionality. And if one speaks of human cloning, emotionality threatens to outstrip all bounds.. . . A somewhat different discussion concerns the possibility of someday producing tissues, organ parts and entire human organs.. . . [S]ome assert that this would be possible only through the production of individuals who would serve as "reservoirs" for organs, tissues or other transplants. . ..The fact is that this isn't true. Biologists are learning to produce animal tissues and organs from stem cells.
NEWS
October 9, 1994 | By Philip Pullella, REUTERS
Occasionally, an isolated event forces Italians to pull off the fast lane of life in their rich and beautiful but sometimes violent country and search their national soul. So it was with the killing of Nicholas Green, a 7-year-old boy from Bodega Bay, Calif., shot by bandits as his family drove along a desolate stretch of highway in Italy's southern Calabria region. It was not so much Nicholas' tragic death that jarred Italians, many of whom have come to accept violence as part of daily life.
NEWS
August 16, 2011 | By Helen H. Shen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Anne Peniazek decided to donate a kidney at age 65, the Narberth woman had bigger hopes than helping just one person. She and her surgeon James Lim of Lankenau Medical Center wanted to start a movement. Instead of arranging a typical kidney donation, Lim helped her start an open-ended kidney-donation chain, one of a small number in the United States. In December, Peniazek's kidney was given to Geoff Bowman of Philadelphia, who at age 32 had already had three transplants.
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