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NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sarah Murnaghan, the 10-year-old Newtown Square girl dying of cystic fibrosis, survived six hours of surgery Wednesday to receive lungs from an adult donor - a transplant made possible by her family's fight to change lung-allocation rules. "We are thrilled to share that Sarah is out of surgery," her mother, Janet Ruddock Murnaghan, posted on Facebook. "Her doctors are very pleased with both her progress during the procedure and her prognosis for recovery. " Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, where Sarah has been in intensive care for weeks, told the family at 10:30 p.m. Tuesday viable adult lungs were available, according to Sarah's aunt, Sharon Ruddock.
NEWS
June 12, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
After weeks of pleas from the family of 10-year-old Sarah Murnaghan of Newtown Square, the organization that sets national organ-transplant policy voted late Monday to temporarily improve children's access to adolescent and adult donor lungs, despite criticizing a federal judge for doing the same thing for her. The executive committee of the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network met to consider whether children under 12 were being treated...
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
PITTSBURGH - The national organization that manages organ transplants rejected making emergency rule changes yesterday for children younger than 12 who are waiting on lungs, but created a special appeal and review system to hear such cases. The executive committee of the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network held a teleconference, and many members voiced serious ethical and medical concerns about a recent federal judge's ruling. The meeting was prompted by the cases of 10-year-old Sarah Murnaghan of Newtown Square and 11-year-old Javier Acosta, two terminally ill children who are awaiting transplants at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
FOOD
June 7, 2013 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
I pulled into the muddy lot between the train tracks and the old sandwich shack, and John Bucci Jr. was waiting. It was after hours at John's Roast Pork in South Philadelphia, but his clean white apron was pulled taut around his waist. And as the garlicky smell of roasting picnic hams rubbed in rosemary wafted from the luncheonette to greet me, Bucci pumped his fists skyward and broke into a victory dance. "You're back!" he said. But the shocker here was that John Bucci Jr. was back - and glowing healthy against tall odds.
NEWS
June 6, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying that three other children at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia are just as sick, Kathleen Sebelius reiterated Tuesday that she would not personally intervene to help a local 10-year-old whose desperate family wants organ-allocation rules changed to give her a better shot at a lung transplant. A spokesman for the secretary of Health and Human Services said Sebelius was at a budget hearing Tuesday on Capitol Hill when Pennsylvania lawmakers asked about Sarah Murnaghan of Newtown Square.
NEWS
June 4, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
RELATIVES OF A 10-year-old girl, who they say has been denied a life-saving lung transplant because of her age, are appealing to the public in hopes of finding a donor to save their child. "There's unfortunately no options left," said Sharon Ruddock, the aunt of Sarah Murnaghan, who has end-stage cystic fibrosis and has been unable to leave Children's Hospital of Philadelphia for three months, needing a ventilator to breathe. The child is a top candidate for an organ from a pediatric donor but few are available, and family members say that under existing policy, a lung from an adult donor would be offered first to all adults in the region, even those more stable and with less severe conditions.
NEWS
April 12, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A gunshot victim whose kidneys, pancreas, heart and liver were transplanted into four recipients transmitted an uncommon parasite to several of them, health officials reported Thursday, suggesting that new screening guidelines may be needed. The infection apparently involved patients at Temple University Hospital and Geisinger Medical Center in central Pennsylvania. The parasite, Strongyloides stercoralis , is found mainly in and around the tropics, and no national guidelines recommend screening donors, according to the investigation by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | BY DON SAPATKIN, Inquirer Staff Writer
IT WAS 1985, Ernie Schiff had just gotten a new heart - his was the fifth such transplant in Philadelphia - and his wife wanted to know what was next. "The coordinator handed me a big book," said Anne Schiff, now 82. "I didn't understand anything about the book. I said, 'You know, I think we should start a group.' And I said, 'Let's call it Second Chance.' Because that's exactly what it was. " Twenty-eight years and nearly 2,500 heart transplants later, Second Chance quietly continues its same dual mission: support for patients who want to know what will happen to them and fundraising to help them afford it. It has expanded from Temple University Hospital, then the local pioneer, to the three other general hospitals in Philly that now do heart transplants - Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Hahnemann University Hospital.
SPORTS
February 6, 2013 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writer silaryt@phillynews.com
WHILE IT never came to kicking and screaming, Tony Nayan did not go quietly. The last thing a shy, reserved kid wants to hear from his mother is that he'll have to switch high schools, especially when a change in cities is also part of the unappreciated package. Though Nayan, a 5-10, 145-pound senior wing guard for Northeast's basketball team, sports no accent, he spent his childhood in Bahston and still misses former friends and coaches. He's still kinda quiet, too. Guess what?
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Michael E. Ruane, Washington Post
A former soldier who became a quadruple amputee after surviving an explosion in Iraq three years ago has undergone a rare double arm transplant at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. Brendan Marrocco, 26, of Staten Island, N.Y., who underwent the marathon surgery last month, was the first service member from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to survive the loss of four limbs, officials have said. He lost both legs above the knee, his left arm below the elbow, and his right arm above the elbow when the military vehicle he was driving was blown up by a powerful roadside bomb on Easter 2009.
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