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Transportation Security Administration

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BUSINESS
May 1, 2003 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The Transportation Security Administration announced plans yesterday to eliminate 3,000 more airport screening jobs by the end of September, to comply with congressional demands to limit staffing and save money. The cuts, coupled with 3,000 others announced in March, amount to about 11 percent of the screeners employed. None of the reductions would occur at Philadelphia International Airport. The moves, which will save an estimated $280 million, will not diminish security, though it is possible they could add some time to the screening process, said Transportation Security Administration director James Loy. A 10-minute-wait limit is still the goal, he said.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
With Thanksgiving around the corner and nearly 25 million travelers expected to take to the skies for the holiday, the Transportation Security Administration is asking fliers to check their pockets, luggage, and handbags before arriving at airport security checkpoints. No grenades - real or fake. No drills or saws. No knives or blades. No toy guns or ammunition. No pepper spray or hammers. No baseball bats or hockey sticks. Leave the brass knuckles at home. Knitting needles are OK; a corkscrew with a blade is not. The ban on small knives and other sharp objects on planes has been a reality for travelers since after the Sept.
NEWS
February 24, 2004 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Starting today, passengers at Philadelphia International Airport must display airline boarding passes and photo identification before going through security checkpoints, the Transportation Security Administration announced yesterday. Previously, passengers were not required to get a boarding pass before the security checkpoints, but did need a government-issued photo ID to get on a flight. Photo IDs, typically a driver's license or passport, are required of all passengers 18 or older.
NEWS
August 7, 2012
NEWARK, N.J. - A terminal at Newark Liberty International Airport was briefly shut down Sunday after officials discovered that a passenger had passed through a security checkpoint without being properly screened. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which operates the airport, said the breach occurred in Terminal C around 10 a.m., causing a lockdown there that lasted about two hours. Operations at the airport's two other terminals were not affected. The breach caused numerous flight delays and required the rescreening of all passengers in the terminal.
NEWS
March 30, 2013
NEWARK, N.J. - Twenty-six baggage screeners at Newark Liberty Airport were fired or suspended recently as part of an investigation into lax security procedures, the Transportation Security Administration said Friday. Three screeners were fired and 23 others were suspended at the conclusion of disciplinary proceedings this week. Seventeen of those suspended had initially been targeted for firing. That brought the total number of firings to four and the total suspensions to 32 since the TSA announced the investigation in October.
NEWS
June 18, 2002 | By Frederick Cusick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Port of Philadelphia and Delaware River organizations yesterday were awarded $1.25 million from the federal government to improve their defenses against terrorism. The money, which is part of $92 million in security-related awards announced by the U.S. Department of Transportation yesterday, includes: $850,000 to the Delaware River Maritime Enterprise Council Inc. for a project related to cargo container tracking at the port. $250,000 to the Maritime Exchange for the Delaware River and Bay Inc. for a project related to port access control to the region's marine terminals.
NEWS
February 11, 2004 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia International Airport's security chief has been fired, as expected, two months after he was put on paid leave over concerns that he improperly hired his son-in-law. James B. Golden Jr. "failed to adhere" to hiring policies and "exercised poor judgment," the federal Transportation Security Administration said in a statement released yesterday. On Monday, Golden, 53, said the agency told him he was being fired for hiring his son-in-law as a supervisor managing the night-shift security screeners.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Airports across the country have sued to block a new Transportation Security Administration directive that requires them, starting Jan. 1, to begin guarding exit security doors as passengers leave flights and head for baggage claims. The agency, created in the aftermath of the September 2001 terrorist attacks, said the change will save $88.1 million a year. The TSA wants its workers to focus on screening passengers and baggage, and said exit-lane monitoring is an airport function.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2007 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leave the kitchen sink at home. The Transportation Security Administration - which actually seized a kitchen sink a passenger once tried to bring on an airplane - is renewing its call for summer travelers to learn before arriving at an airport what is allowed past checkpoints. Your fellow passengers will thank you, TSA officials say, because, if you don't know the rules, it can slow down the security lines for everyone. TSA screeners have seen an uptick this month in passengers who apparently fly infrequently and haven't heard that most liquids, aerosols and gels, and a long list of other items, are banned from commercial airline flights, TSA spokeswoman Amy Kudwa said.
NEWS
January 2, 2004 | By Cynthia Burton INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New Year's Day travelers didn't seem concerned that Philadelphia's airport security chief had been suspended for a string of alleged security lapses, despite the nation's state of high alert. Security appeared tight at Philadelphia International Airport yesterday. Bags and tickets were checked. Drivers were warned as they arrived that their cars could be searched. But passengers and those waiting for them, were, well, kind of relaxed. "I'm not really worried," Lilly Schofield, of Bridport, Vt., said as she sat comfortably on a green leather couch with a friend.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 1, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
If the Department of Homeland Security shuts down at midnight because of lack of budget funding, the majority of employees working for the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) will still come to work. Screening officers at security checkpoints at Philadelphia International Airport will remain on the job, said TSA spokesman Michael McCarthy. "As a counterterrorism organization, our dedicated and professional workforce will - in the event of a shutdown - continue to secure our nation's transportation systems, without pay, just as they did during the government shutdown of 2013," said TSA acting administrator Melvin Carraway.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
With Thanksgiving around the corner and nearly 25 million travelers expected to take to the skies for the holiday, the Transportation Security Administration is asking fliers to check their pockets, luggage, and handbags before arriving at airport security checkpoints. No grenades - real or fake. No drills or saws. No knives or blades. No toy guns or ammunition. No pepper spray or hammers. No baseball bats or hockey sticks. Leave the brass knuckles at home. Knitting needles are OK; a corkscrew with a blade is not. The ban on small knives and other sharp objects on planes has been a reality for travelers since after the Sept.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Travelers may soon pay more for a plane ticket because the Transportation Security Administration is raising the passenger security fee at U.S. airports. Fliers currently pay $2.50 for each leg of a connecting flight, capped at $5 per one-way trip. Starting July 21, the fee will jump to a flat $5.60 per one-way trip. The $5 cap on one-way travel will disappear. Congress approved the higher fees as part of the bipartisan budget act approved in December. The money will go to the general fund of the U.S. Treasury to be used to offset TSA costs for providing aviation security and to reduce the federal deficit.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia International Airport had about 593 canceled arriving and departing flights as of Tuesday afternoon. Airport spokeswoman Victoria Lupica said at 3:30 p.m. there were "very few people" in the terminals. She said one runway was open, and the airport was operational. "Crews are working tirelessly to keep all paved surfaces clear," Lupica said. Airport officials had a conference call with airlines, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
BUSINESS
December 7, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Airports across the country have sued to block a new Transportation Security Administration directive that requires them, starting Jan. 1, to begin guarding exit security doors as passengers leave flights and head for baggage claims. The agency, created in the aftermath of the September 2001 terrorist attacks, said the change will save $88.1 million a year. The TSA wants its workers to focus on screening passengers and baggage, and said exit-lane monitoring is an airport function.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Transportation Security Administration said Monday that the public should "not anticipate a change in airport security" after the shootings at Los Angeles International Airport last week. "However, passengers may see an increased presence of local law-enforcement officers" across the country, the agency said. "Security measures will be both seen and unseen. " Friday's slaying of Gerardo Hernandez, the first TSA employee killed in the line of duty, was not unlike mass shootings at a Colorado movie theater, a Connecticut elementary school, or the Sept.
NEWS
May 1, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Rep. Mike Fitzpatrick (R., Bucks) announced Monday that he would cosponsor a bipartisan bill proposing mandatory secondary cockpit barriers on commercial airliners. Fitzpatrick said in a statement that the barriers would serve as a "fail-safe ... to prevent airliners from being used as weapons of terror. " The Federal Aviation Administration mandated reinforced cockpit doors after the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, but Fitzpatrick said flight crew members often open those doors briefly during flights - for bathroom breaks or to get meals, for example - making the cockpit potentially vulnerable to attack.
NEWS
March 30, 2013
NEWARK, N.J. - Twenty-six baggage screeners at Newark Liberty Airport were fired or suspended recently as part of an investigation into lax security procedures, the Transportation Security Administration said Friday. Three screeners were fired and 23 others were suspended at the conclusion of disciplinary proceedings this week. Seventeen of those suspended had initially been targeted for firing. That brought the total number of firings to four and the total suspensions to 32 since the TSA announced the investigation in October.
NEWS
March 14, 2013
It's easy to dump on the Transportation Security Administration, the toddler-searching, Gatorade-confiscating, "junk"-touching agency American travelers love to hate. So when it managed last week to generate such alarming headlines as "TSA to allow knives on planes," it's not surprising that an uproar ensued. But the trouble is not so much the TSA's new policies on permissible carry-on items. It's the old, ill-conceived policies from which the agency is awkwardly attempting to extricate itself.
NEWS
September 13, 2012 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Select passengers traveling from Philadelphia International Airport will get to keep their shoes and belts on and laptops in their carry-ons when they go through security, beginning immediately. The program will be available locally to qualifying US Airways Group Inc. travelers and frequent fliers on Delta, United, American, and Alaska airlines who go through security screening at the airport's Terminal C security checkpoint. The good news: Approved passengers will be able to zip through security with less hassle, beginning Wednesday.
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