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Transylvania

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NEWS
July 3, 2008 | By Lauren Meade FOR THE INQUIRER
What would her life be like without a cell phone, Facebook, or hot running water? Conestoga High School student Sarah Guyer soon will find out when she heads to rural Transylvania for summer vacation. The 17-year-old knows exactly two words of Hungarian, the predominant language of the region: eper (strawberry) and nem (no). Though her vocabulary likely won't take her far, Guyer plans to surmount the language barrier during her stay with a host family by playing Pictionary.
TRAVEL
November 16, 2015 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
TRANSYLVANIA, Romania - The two-lane road through the Carpathian Mountains twisted under a canopy of pines, but we were no longer climbing. The hairpin turn sloped gently downward, while occasional breaks in the forest offered glimpses of a wide, verdant valley with a castle clinging to a hill in the distance. Welcome to Transylvania. This plateau, settled by the Saxons in the Middle Ages, was once part of the mighty Austro-Hungarian Empire. The region became part of Romania in the aftermath of World War I, yet retains much of its Teutonic heritage.
TRAVEL
January 7, 2013 | By Alison Mutler, Associated Press
SASCHIZ, Romania - On the last day of Queen Elizabeth's Diamond Jubilee celebrations, Prince Charles joined his mother at Buckingham Palace and waved to the crowds in a ceremony watched by millions around the globe. The next day, the 63-year-old heir to the British throne was a world away, in the heart of Transylvania, a tranquil haven he calls "the jewel in Romania's crown," soaking up rural scenes that look like pages from the Grimms' fairy tales. Here, in the small 13th-century town of Saschiz, life has all but stood still.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2007 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
INTERESTED in sinking your teeth into speculative real estate? An heir of Romania's former royals put "Dracula's Castle" in Transylvania up for sale yesterday. The Bran Castle, perched on a cliff in central Romania, is a top tourist attraction because of its ties to Prince Vlad the Impaler, whose cruelty inspired Bram Stoker's 1897 novel, "Dracula. " Legend has it that Vlad, who made Guantanamo seem like preschool, spent one night in the 1400s at the castle. Oh, but what a night.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2010
GIMME FIVE There's actually a pretty good "Frankenstein" update in theaters today, called "Splice. " Certainly better than "Wolfman," the fifth recent attempt by Universal to raid its old horror vault. 1. "Wolfman" (2010). Benicio Del Toro returns to ancestral home, where he meets a vampire. 2. "The Mummy Returns" (2001). Brendan Fraser and Rachel Weisz try to save the world when Imhotep awakens. 3. "Van Helsing" (2004) Hugh Jackman goes to Transylvania looking for Count Dracula.
NEWS
May 14, 2007
DESPITE ALL the verbal cheerleading about this city, the reality is that it will always be in decline because of a cultural legacy of neglect of its citizenry and parochialism, both of which have left Philadelphia with low human capital. In other words, you are stuck with a disproportionate number of uneducated citizens, with much of the city's leadership included. Administratively, Philly is more like Transylvania in its vampiric thirst for sucking money from its residents via fines, fees and taxes, promising in return only an eternal life of incompetence in the delivery of basic services.
NEWS
July 17, 2010
Vonetta McGee, 65, a film and television actress originally known for blaxploitation pictures such as Blacula , Hammer , and Shaft in Africa , died July 9 of cardiac arrest in Berkeley, Calif., where she lived. In Blacula (1972), Ms. McGee portrayed the love interest of Mamuwalde (William Marshall), an African prince who, after an ill-fated trip to Transylvania centuries earlier, reemerges in modern Los Angeles as a member of the thirsty undead. In Hammer (1972)
NEWS
October 29, 1992 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The holiday season began early in Wynnewood Sunday as nearly 250 guests attended the Shipley Shops of Distinction, a benefit for the Shipley School in Bryn Mawr. At the event, in Clothier Hall at SS. Sahag and Mesrob Armenian Church, nearly two dozen merchants displayed wares and gift items. Joan Frazier of Bryn Mawr and Betsy Rorer of Villanova co-chaired the event, which continued through yesterday. Joan Chappell, Radnor, and Delia Stroud, Haverford, served as vice co-chairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1989 | By Dick Polman, Inquirer Staff Writer
What was that line Lenny Bruce had about a thin, pretty woman? Something about how a thin, pretty woman looked like "a hockey stick with hair on it"? He should only have lived long enough to see Geena Davis play her first scene in Tootsie. It was (for men, anyway) one of the more memorable film debuts. There have been others, of course - Michael Keaton bopping into the morgue with "Jumpin' Jack Flash" on his lips in Night Shift, Dustin Hoffman staring into a fish tank in The Graduate - but few have entered the world of cinema so successfully in their underwear.
NEWS
October 31, 2006 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was Jonathan Maberry's Scottish grandmother who put vampires into his life. And the Warrington writer is gruesomely grateful. Citadel Press recently published his Vampire Universe: The Dark World of Supernatural Beings That Haunt Us, Hunt Us, and Hunger for Us. His first book about the big, bad bats, Vampire Slayers' Field Guide to the Undead, was published in 2003 by Strider Nolan. Maberry's mother's mother was born in the 1880s near Edinburgh and raised in Alsace-Lorraine.
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TRAVEL
November 16, 2015 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
TRANSYLVANIA, Romania - The two-lane road through the Carpathian Mountains twisted under a canopy of pines, but we were no longer climbing. The hairpin turn sloped gently downward, while occasional breaks in the forest offered glimpses of a wide, verdant valley with a castle clinging to a hill in the distance. Welcome to Transylvania. This plateau, settled by the Saxons in the Middle Ages, was once part of the mighty Austro-Hungarian Empire. The region became part of Romania in the aftermath of World War I, yet retains much of its Teutonic heritage.
TRAVEL
January 7, 2013 | By Alison Mutler, Associated Press
SASCHIZ, Romania - On the last day of Queen Elizabeth's Diamond Jubilee celebrations, Prince Charles joined his mother at Buckingham Palace and waved to the crowds in a ceremony watched by millions around the globe. The next day, the 63-year-old heir to the British throne was a world away, in the heart of Transylvania, a tranquil haven he calls "the jewel in Romania's crown," soaking up rural scenes that look like pages from the Grimms' fairy tales. Here, in the small 13th-century town of Saschiz, life has all but stood still.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | BY ROGER MOORE, MCT News Service
WELCOME TO the "Hotel Transylvania," where you can check out any time you like, but you will never laugh. With apologies to The Eagles, "almost never. " Sony Animation got into the Adam Sandler business this time out. The "Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs" folks must never have seen "Eight Crazy Nights," Sandler's first effort at turning his "gift" for funny voices into a cartoon. It's a good-looking, laugh-starved farce that puts Dracula (Sandler) in charge of a hotel for monsters - "Human-free since 1895" - and makes him an overprotective single father with a teenage daughter (Selena Gomez)
NEWS
July 17, 2010
Vonetta McGee, 65, a film and television actress originally known for blaxploitation pictures such as Blacula , Hammer , and Shaft in Africa , died July 9 of cardiac arrest in Berkeley, Calif., where she lived. In Blacula (1972), Ms. McGee portrayed the love interest of Mamuwalde (William Marshall), an African prince who, after an ill-fated trip to Transylvania centuries earlier, reemerges in modern Los Angeles as a member of the thirsty undead. In Hammer (1972)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2010
GIMME FIVE There's actually a pretty good "Frankenstein" update in theaters today, called "Splice. " Certainly better than "Wolfman," the fifth recent attempt by Universal to raid its old horror vault. 1. "Wolfman" (2010). Benicio Del Toro returns to ancestral home, where he meets a vampire. 2. "The Mummy Returns" (2001). Brendan Fraser and Rachel Weisz try to save the world when Imhotep awakens. 3. "Van Helsing" (2004) Hugh Jackman goes to Transylvania looking for Count Dracula.
NEWS
July 3, 2008 | By Lauren Meade FOR THE INQUIRER
What would her life be like without a cell phone, Facebook, or hot running water? Conestoga High School student Sarah Guyer soon will find out when she heads to rural Transylvania for summer vacation. The 17-year-old knows exactly two words of Hungarian, the predominant language of the region: eper (strawberry) and nem (no). Though her vocabulary likely won't take her far, Guyer plans to surmount the language barrier during her stay with a host family by playing Pictionary.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2007 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
INTERESTED in sinking your teeth into speculative real estate? An heir of Romania's former royals put "Dracula's Castle" in Transylvania up for sale yesterday. The Bran Castle, perched on a cliff in central Romania, is a top tourist attraction because of its ties to Prince Vlad the Impaler, whose cruelty inspired Bram Stoker's 1897 novel, "Dracula. " Legend has it that Vlad, who made Guantanamo seem like preschool, spent one night in the 1400s at the castle. Oh, but what a night.
NEWS
May 14, 2007
DESPITE ALL the verbal cheerleading about this city, the reality is that it will always be in decline because of a cultural legacy of neglect of its citizenry and parochialism, both of which have left Philadelphia with low human capital. In other words, you are stuck with a disproportionate number of uneducated citizens, with much of the city's leadership included. Administratively, Philly is more like Transylvania in its vampiric thirst for sucking money from its residents via fines, fees and taxes, promising in return only an eternal life of incompetence in the delivery of basic services.
NEWS
October 31, 2006 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was Jonathan Maberry's Scottish grandmother who put vampires into his life. And the Warrington writer is gruesomely grateful. Citadel Press recently published his Vampire Universe: The Dark World of Supernatural Beings That Haunt Us, Hunt Us, and Hunger for Us. His first book about the big, bad bats, Vampire Slayers' Field Guide to the Undead, was published in 2003 by Strider Nolan. Maberry's mother's mother was born in the 1880s near Edinburgh and raised in Alsace-Lorraine.
NEWS
March 28, 2004 | By Matthew Schofield INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Before Toma Petre's relatives pulled his body from the grave, ripped out his heart, burned it to ashes, mixed it with water and drank it, he hadn't been in the news much. That's often the way here with vampires. Quiet lives, active deaths. Villagers here aren't up in arms about the undead - they're pretty common - but they are outraged that the police are involved in a simple vampire slaying. After all, vampire slaying is an accepted, though hidden, bit of national heritage, even if it is illegal.
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