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Trap Door

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FOOD
March 17, 2011
This smartly simple innovation allows the richness of a French press full-immersion brew, but with the clarity of a paper-filtered drip. A tricky stopper on the bottom holds the brew inside the chamber until it's done steeping, then releases a stream of java like a trap door when it's set atop a cup, a standard paper filter holding the murky sediment behind. - Craig LaBan Clever Dripper, $18, Spruce Street Espresso, 1101 Spruce St., 267-285-6464.       Pour like a pro This beehive-shaped stainless Buono kettle from Hario is essential gear for the hipster barista, with a long and slender spout that allows for slow, precision streaming onto fresh ground coffee in your drip filter (no doubt, a trendy Hario V60)
NEWS
January 11, 2001 | By Steve Esack, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A man who authorities say trolled Chester city streets looking for prostitutes was charged yesterday with killing one of them in his apartment last summer, then wrapping her body in plastic and hiding it in the basement. Michael Davies, 43, of the 400 block of Pusey Avenue, was arraigned on first-degree murder charges in the disappearance and death of Marla Opher, 34, whose body was found July 15 in a tiny closet beneath the basement stairs of his building. "A number of facts were put together [during the investigation]
NEWS
December 8, 1991 | By Kathi Kauffman, Special to The Inquirer
The Bryn Mawr Fire Company is hoping to sell its fire station, a building that dates back to 1906, when the company operated with one horse-drawn fire pump. Larry Kelly, president, said the fire company had outgrown its building at Lancaster and North Merion Avenues and hoped to use the proceeds from a sale to build a new station nearby. He said he would ask Lower Merion Township officials at a meeting Tuesday to donate the land for the station. The company has already contacted at least one potential buyer for the old building, developer Steve Bajus of S.W. Bajus Ltd. "They called me and asked to come up and look at the station," said Bajus, who counts the Wayne Hotel and the Radnor Hotel among his projects and is known for his renovations of older, historically significant buildings.
NEWS
July 31, 2003 | By Mark Fazlollah INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia police yesterday announced a series of firearms confiscations under the department's new Gun Recovery Reward Information Program (GRRIP), aimed at reducing the number of illegal weapons in the city. Chief Inspector William Blackburn Jr. said officers seized a semiautomatic AR-15 assault rifle - the civilian version of the army's M-16 - a shotgun and a handgun in a raid earlier in the day in the 1300 block of South 51st Street. During a search of the house, investigators also found five ounces of crack cocaine and a police radio that had been reported lost in 1998.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1993 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Gerard J. Schubert, the affable founder and producing artistic director of the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival, remarked not long ago that he'd elected to stage Macbeth this season because he had never seen the play done to his satisfaction. The observation struck a chord, for neither had I. This morning, I'm sorry to say, I still haven't. The Macbeth that Schubert has set on the stage of the Labuda Center at Allentown College is an intelligently conceived production, one that intriguingly contrasts the religious and pagan currents that interweave through the play.
LIVING
August 31, 1999 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
The playground is the new domain of pop. Following the hysterical success that greeted the Spice Girls, the Backstreet Boys and 'N Sync, Britney Spears' debut . . . Baby One More Time has just been certified as having sold five million copies. After eight years of the greatest economic expansion in U.S. history, it turns out baby-sitters have all the money. Actually, judging from the crowd at Spears' concert Sunday night at the Tower Theater, it's not the sitters, it's the sittees.
NEWS
September 16, 1997 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
While you were at the beach, the Academy of Music was undergoing $4 million worth of major surgery, followed by a facelift, a tummy tuck and cosmetic enhancements. Since midnight on June 2, just after the final performance of the Pennsylvania Ballet's "Sleeping Beauty," around-the-clock shifts have labored to meet today's 10:30 a.m. deadline - a Philadelphia Orchestra rehearsal for tonight's gala opening concert, followed by Thursday's regular 98th season opener. The construction represents the middle year of a five-year, $40 million project to transform the Grand Old Lady of Locust Street from an 1857 opera house with antique facilities (like a curtain operated by rope pulls)
NEWS
September 30, 1992 | By Mac Daniel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Tuna fish, pet rabbits and keen wits outsmarted Mac the bobcat, who was recaptured late Monday by his Lower Providence owner after escaping the confines of his suburban home and romping in the wilds of Montgomery County for the last month. "He was smart," his owner, Joe Guarino, said yesterday. "He was very smart. " Mac, all 35 pounds of him, escaped Sept. 3 after he tried to nab a moth hovering outside Guarino's screen door. During a leap, the bobcat hit the door latch, paused for a minute, and scampered into freedom, leaving Guarino to search for about a month.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1991 | By Nancy Goldner and Jules Cohn, Special to The Inquirer
A few days ago at the Academy of Music, the bustle by the stage door was inescapable. A seven-headed mouse passed along Locust Street and into the academy's side door. A retinue of candy canes and other sweets followed. And all the necessary gear for any self-respecting toy soldier. The stage crew for the Pennsylvania Ballet was bringing in props and costumes for the ballet's production of The Nutcracker, which opens Friday. A peek toward the stage revealed that the Christmas tree was already inside, standing tall, proud and amazingly serene while the crew attached bows and other ornaments to its boughs.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 24, 2012 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer
DAVID CROCKETT had been driving from Overbrook to work in Trenton two summers ago when he decided to cut the cost of his daily commute by using SEPTA. "Everyone was telling me, 'If you took the train, it would be cheaper,' " said Crockett, who works in real-estate development and construction management. On Sept. 1, 2010, perhaps his third day of riding SEPTA, Crockett said, he was exiting the R7 train in Trenton when one of the spring-loaded trapdoors that cover the train's stairwells popped open, cutting him on the right leg, where he still has a scar.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2011 | By Dante Anthony Fuoco, Inquirer Staff Writer
At first, it seems an impractical, maybe impossible, feat for a musical: Land a helicopter on stage at the story's climax and, with two actors safely secured, make it fly away 40 seconds later. Oh - and do it in America's oldest theater, where old-school sandbags and ropes still make up the bulk of backstage technology. But show after show, the cast and crew of the Walnut Street Theatre's production of Miss Saigon have done precisely that. It's not just the visual splendor of the helicopter's flight that grabs the audience during the poignant "evacuation scene," in which American soldier Chris (Eric Kunze)
FOOD
March 17, 2011
This smartly simple innovation allows the richness of a French press full-immersion brew, but with the clarity of a paper-filtered drip. A tricky stopper on the bottom holds the brew inside the chamber until it's done steeping, then releases a stream of java like a trap door when it's set atop a cup, a standard paper filter holding the murky sediment behind. - Craig LaBan Clever Dripper, $18, Spruce Street Espresso, 1101 Spruce St., 267-285-6464.       Pour like a pro This beehive-shaped stainless Buono kettle from Hario is essential gear for the hipster barista, with a long and slender spout that allows for slow, precision streaming onto fresh ground coffee in your drip filter (no doubt, a trendy Hario V60)
REAL_ESTATE
March 8, 2009 | By Paula H. Goff FOR THE INQUIRER
It was 2005, the height of the real estate market (remember when?), and the Cape Cod in Blue Bell was being shown for just one day. Lisa and Paul Lonie, who had been looking for a non-tract house with a water feature, had but 20 minutes to make a bid. Drawn to the 2-acre property by its well-tended landscaping and a large pond with a Monet-style bridge, they took the plunge. "And I went, 'Oh my God, what are we doing?' " Lisa Lonie recalled. With two of their three children out of the house, they would be trading their six-bedroom Victorian in East Mount Airy and its postage-stamp yard for a tight three-bedroom built in 1964 using plans purchased from Better Homes and Gardens.
NEWS
July 31, 2003 | By Mark Fazlollah INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia police yesterday announced a series of firearms confiscations under the department's new Gun Recovery Reward Information Program (GRRIP), aimed at reducing the number of illegal weapons in the city. Chief Inspector William Blackburn Jr. said officers seized a semiautomatic AR-15 assault rifle - the civilian version of the army's M-16 - a shotgun and a handgun in a raid earlier in the day in the 1300 block of South 51st Street. During a search of the house, investigators also found five ounces of crack cocaine and a police radio that had been reported lost in 1998.
NEWS
January 11, 2001 | By Steve Esack, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A man who authorities say trolled Chester city streets looking for prostitutes was charged yesterday with killing one of them in his apartment last summer, then wrapping her body in plastic and hiding it in the basement. Michael Davies, 43, of the 400 block of Pusey Avenue, was arraigned on first-degree murder charges in the disappearance and death of Marla Opher, 34, whose body was found July 15 in a tiny closet beneath the basement stairs of his building. "A number of facts were put together [during the investigation]
LIVING
August 31, 2000 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
The playground is the new domain of pop. Following the hysterical success that greeted the Spice Girls, the Backstreet Boys and 'N Sync, Britney Spears' debut . . . Baby One More Time has just been certified as having sold five million copies. After eight years of the greatest economic expansion in U.S. history, it turns out baby-sitters have all the money. Actually, judging from the crowd at Spears' concert Sunday night at the Tower Theater, it's not the sitters, it's the sittees.
NEWS
September 16, 1997 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
While you were at the beach, the Academy of Music was undergoing $4 million worth of major surgery, followed by a facelift, a tummy tuck and cosmetic enhancements. Since midnight on June 2, just after the final performance of the Pennsylvania Ballet's "Sleeping Beauty," around-the-clock shifts have labored to meet today's 10:30 a.m. deadline - a Philadelphia Orchestra rehearsal for tonight's gala opening concert, followed by Thursday's regular 98th season opener. The construction represents the middle year of a five-year, $40 million project to transform the Grand Old Lady of Locust Street from an 1857 opera house with antique facilities (like a curtain operated by rope pulls)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1995 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
It's safe to say that Sophocles, who wrote Oedipus at Colonus as a kind of valedictory and summing-up near the end of his 90-year life, would be quite baffled by the stomping, shouting resurrection musical that Lee Breuer and Bob Telson made of his play in 1983. Yet it's also a good bet that if the old Greek had seen The Gospel at Colonus, which is what Breuer and Telson called their version of Oedipus' sanctuary and ultimate death, it probably wouldn't have offended his notion of what good theater ought to be. Theater, Sophocles might have said, should stir the blood of the populace with stories of great events, stories that plumb the deepest mysteries of human existence.
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