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NEWS
February 20, 2009
I'M appalled that we may have to pay to have our trash picked up. People will now dump their trash anywhere they can. Do you really think people in neighborhoods like North Philly are going to pay to have their trash picked up when they don't even pay their utilities, or will they have it picked up for free because they are considered low-income? Would this be fair to people who get up and go to work every day? Deborah Bennett, Philadelphia
NEWS
July 22, 2004
AFTER trash/recycling day, our neighborhoods are left with litter and mess all over the place because careless sanitation crews throw bags and cans everywhere. I urge residents to take a digital photo of the individuals and trucks in question and report these violations to csstreets@phila.gov and managing.director@phila.gov. It's time sanitation crews did their jobs properly. Nikola Sizgorich Philadelphia
NEWS
March 23, 2007
AS A RESIDENT of this city for 54 years, I am totally disgusted with the filth on our highways, byways and residential streets. There is trash and filth everywhere you look. Where is the civic pride that was once a part of our culture? It is no wonder that it has gone by the wayside, as so many moral issues have. I have seen young children, teenagers and adults discard potato-chip bags, plastic soda bottles, candy wrappers, etc., right on the ground. This happens even when there is a litter basket but a few feet away.
NEWS
April 9, 1990 | By Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
James Gaskins swiftly tosses one swollen garbage sack after another from the curb into a yellow city compactor truck. "Yo, that's it," yells his partner as the two men heft trash-filled boxes along McKean Street in South Philadelphia. Newspapers and food packages, glass and plastic bottles, throw rugs and fragments of furniture - all land in the maw of the Streets Department truck. "This is what we get all day," Gaskins shrugs. The waste from the homes on McKean Street and the rest of the city is buried by the truckload at a Bucks County landfill.
NEWS
February 13, 1987
Just a note on trash. Two things would help: Get rid of junk mail and develop a trash bag with a nontoxic substance that repels animals. John Houghton Camden.
NEWS
November 15, 1987 | By Mary Lou Jerrell, Special to The Inquirer
The Merchantville Borough Council has approved a $3,800 expenditure to remove trash and debris from a vacant house on Clinton Avenue. The trash is to be removed in preparation for selling the house so it can be placed back on the tax books. The borough has owned the house since 1972, according to Mayor John F. Morrissey. Borough officials said they expect to remove 300 cubic yards of trash by the end of the month. About 50 yards are expected to be recyclable newspapers and heavy metal such as pipes.
NEWS
June 7, 1986 | By BOB WARNER and LEON TAYLOR, Daily News Staff Writers
As frustrated residents were hurling their Hefty bags into the street, Mayor Goode said yesterday that city trash collections will continue to be "chaotic and unpredictable" until Philadelphia builds a mass-burning trash plant at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. "Until we find a predictable disposal mechanism, we will have erratic and chaotic, crisis-oriented trash collection because we don't have a predictable place to put the trash," Goode told reporters. ". . . I apologize to the citizens for what is happening, but there is no way that we can solve this problem until we find some way inside this city to dispose of our trash.
NEWS
May 20, 1994 | BY ABE GOODHART
The other day as I was putting out trash and garbage it occurred to me that I was becoming an habitual criminal. Trouble is, I don't know where to turn myself in for breaking at least two trash and garbage laws each week. One law says recyclables such as paper, glass and metal cans must be placed in or next to a metal container holding up to 20 gallons. No plastic is allowed. These items are scheduled for collection on a specified day every other week. For my Northeast neighborhood, that day is Monday.
NEWS
September 10, 1986 | By DAVE RACHER, Daily News Staff Writer
A 49-year-old private trash hauler was sentenced yesterday to an 11 1/2- to 23-month prison term for paying about $20,000 in bribes to city Streets Department employees to allow illegal dumping at city facilities. Anthony Galiano, 49, of Franklin Street near Tasker, who previously pleaded guilty to a bribery charge, also was placed on four years' probation and ordered to make restitution to the city of $30,000 by Common Pleas Judge William Porter. Assistant District Attorney David Michelman said Galiano was one of 14 private haulers and 18 city workers arrested following a grand jury investigation of the payoff scheme, which operated between 1980 and 1985.
NEWS
July 15, 1990 | By Aliah D. Wright, Special to The Inquirer
In late June, Joan Kaplan of Bustleton noticed that her trash was being picked up two to three days late. "At first, I thought they changed the trash day," she said. Her trash was not the only one left sitting for days. Councilwoman Joan L. Krajewski, who represents the Sixth District, has received 15 to 20 complaints a day at her office. "I'm hearing from my neighbors and all of Mayfair," she said. "Our trash day here is Friday. Sometimes, it doesn't get collected until late Saturday night or early Sunday.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 14, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE LITTLE PATCH of woods off 59th Street near Cobbs Creek is a place where people drink beer, have sex in the dirt and dump their trash. Dozens of tall cans of cheap beer, a few condom wrappers and old, wet clothes were scattered there yesterday afternoon, right near a line of police tape that stretched from tree to tree. The blanket that Nyia Parler allegedly used to cover her quadriplegic son before she abandoned him there last week was gone. The Bible she allegedly left on his chest, perhaps hoping a higher power could sort it all out, was gone, too. Parler, 41, of Baltimore Avenue near Alden Street in West Philly, left her son, Daequan Norman, in those woods about a quarter-mile from her home last Monday morning, police said.
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two bills proposed to City Council on Thursday would result in scads of new trash and recycling receptacles being placed across Philadelphia in an effort to curb the city's litter problem. Under the first bill, any business that sells packaged or prepared foods for takeout would have to put both a trash and recycling bin within 10 feet of the front door. The second bill would make landlords of buildings with six or more units provide a communal trash and recycling receptacle for tenants.
NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By Aaron Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Khalif Tinley stays in his lane on the basketball court. The 6-foot-1 senior for Imhotep Charter isn't flashy, and he typically doesn't score much, but you'd be hard pressed to find someone who works harder. Friday night at Archbishop Carroll, Tinley did the dirty work and helped the Panthers beat Berks Catholic, 74-43, in the first round of the PIAA Class AAA tournament. "I just play defense," Tinley said. "I don't get outside of myself. I just stay in my little area of the game.
SPORTS
January 26, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
After Tuesday night's State of the Union address, the first American president with a fadeaway jumper was accused of trash-talking. Those critics might be on to something. Unable to put away rival Republicans, President Obama appears lately to have resorted to a sports standby, getting into his opponents' faces and heads. After Republicans mockingly applauded his reference to a final campaign, the president's "I won twice" zinger was a retort any sports fan could appreciate. All that was missing was a "sucka!"
BUSINESS
December 28, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Independence Blue Cross on Friday disclosed a data breach affecting 12,500 of its more than 2.5 million members. Unlike most high-profile cases of personal data loss, such as the one at Target stores last year affecting 70 million people, the IBC case did not involve computers. The incident happened in October, when maintenance workers threw out four boxes of member records that were supposed to be moved from one floor to another at IBC's offices, the company said Friday in a legal notice.
SPORTS
December 11, 2014 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
WHILE REPORTERS were asking Eagles quarterback Mark Sanchez yesterday about Seattle defensive end Michael Bennett's saying that Philadelphia police should look into Sanchez "trying to impersonate a good quarterback," after Sunday's game, a jersey sat draped over a box in the overflow from LeSean McCoy's NovaCare locker stall. It was Seattle cornerback Richard Sherman's white No. 25, and across the blue numeral 5, Sherman had scrawled a message in silver Sharpie, congratulating McCoy for becoming the franchise's all-time leading rusher.
NEWS
November 1, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thirty-five years ago, when John Doherty was doing rehab work for Campus Apartments, removing old plasterwork to make way for drywall, he was struck by the beauty of the buildings' antique plaster flourishes - all destined for the landfill. Instead of throwing the pieces out, he began salvaging them to sell at a flea market on the weekends. Then he learned that he could make rubber molds of the intricate pieces and replicate them as many times as he wanted, for use in his own designs.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2014
A THOUSAND bucks to you and us (but especially us) approaches the level of real money. To Hollywood biggies' bank accounts, however, that kind of dough isn't even a rounding error . . . it's like spilled change, the kind that we here at Temporary Tattle are not too proud to bend over to pick up when we see it glittering among the discarded gum. And fight you to be the one to pocket it. According to the scandal scroungers at TMZ, who went digging through...
SPORTS
October 17, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com
WITH THE WAY Qazi Jones plays football, you might not figure him for someone who is passionate about joining a helping profession. Jones, a 5-9, 165-pound senior, is an aggressive, sometimes loud-talking linebacker for Southern High. However, when he was about 11, a trip to the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia sold him on nursing. It wasn't serious, but after Jones filleted his left thumb while slicing an orange, he did require stitches. Blue scrubs were all he could recall about the female nurse whose compassionate bedside manner birthed his passion.
NEWS
September 27, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph M. Blosenski Jr., 71, of Honey Brook, the founder of a trash hauling company in Chester County, died Tuesday, Sept. 23, of cancer at his home. He was president of Blosenski Disposal Service in Elverson, which he started in 1962 with a pickup truck in his neighborhood. He owned and operated the refuse business for 30 years. In 1994, the firm was bought by his son Anthony J. Sr. and renamed A.J. Blosenski Inc. Trash & Recycling Service. Joseph Blosenski became a vice president of his son's company.
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