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Trash Compactor

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NEWS
July 25, 1987 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Police yesterday found the body of a 2-year-old girl in the basement of a West Philadelphia apartment building where she apparently plunged down the trash chute of the Philadelphia Housing Authority high-rise. Teresse Anne McNair was reported missing about 9:30 p.m. Thursday after she disappeared from the hallway of the 13th floor of the Westpark apartments in the 300 block of North Busti Street. Her body was found inside a trash compactor about 1:30 a.m. Police, joined by friends and relatives of the child, had started searching the 19-story building after she was reported missing.
NEWS
May 24, 2011 | Associated Press
NEW YORK - A newborn tossed down a housing project's trash chute survived the eight-story fall because he landed on a pile of garbage and the compactor was jammed, investigators said yesterday. A maintenance worker heard a baby's cries coming from the trash compactor in the Walt Whitman Houses on Sunday morning. The child was taken to Brooklyn Hospital, where he remained in stable condition, said a spokesman for the Brooklyn District Attorney's Office. He said the baby did not appear to have been injured in the fall.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Roger Pancoast, 42, of Lansdale, was in the middle of getting dressed for a Christmas dinner at his in-laws' home when his beeper went off. Joe Stockert, 24, was with his family watching television while the turkey roasted. It was 1:34 p.m. and the two Fairmount Fire Company volunteers figured they would be back in time to eat. It was only a fire in a large trash bin. They knew it would be a quick battle. But they didn't know that a couple of firebugs, a broken alarm and a leaking gas main would keep them hopping from fire call to fire call for the next 12 hours.
NEWS
July 2, 1993 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
One word omitted from a judge's charge to a jury has cost a 25-year-old Philadelphia man more than $1.2 million. Edward Marshall's civil award against the maker of an industrial trash compactor has been overturned by the state Superior Court, which said that "the trial judge erred by instructing the jury a product must be 'safe for use' as opposed to 'safe for intended use'. " On Jan. 12, 1985, Marshall, then 17, suffered severe injuries to his fingers while using a trash compactor at his job as a stock boy for a Shop N' Bag. In reviewing the case, the Superior Court said Marshall may have been responsible for his own injuries during "a cleaning maneuver that was highly dangerous," or by taking a ride "by hanging" on the machine while it was moving.
NEWS
July 18, 1989 | By Neal Thompson, Special to The Inquirer
Three maintenance workers at the Whitehall Laboratories were burned yesterday during an explosion in a trash compactor behind the pharmaceutical company's plant in Hammonton, Atlantic County, police said. The blast occurred shortly after 3 p.m., and the victims - two men and a woman - were taken to William B. Kessler Memorial Hospital in Hammonton and later transferred to the burn unit at St. Agnes Medical Center in Philadelphia, where they were all listed in stable condition last night, according to St. Agnes' nursing supervisor Tina Trantas.
NEWS
February 5, 1989 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
Uwchlan will have its first fast-food restaurant - a Burger King - if a plan introduced last week is approved. The restaurant would be built on the east side of the Lionville Shopping Center at Route 113 and Eagleview Boulevard, next to the office of the Chester County Board of Realtors. Proposing the new restaurant is Richard D. Mukalian Jr. of Mukalian Enterprises Inc., who also owns Burger King franchises in Chadds Ford, West Chester and Exton. Mukalian's engineer, Surender Kohli of Malvern, said it would resemble the Chadds Ford Burger King at Routes 1 and 100, which has wooden siding and a greenhouse-type eating area.
NEWS
August 12, 1987 | By KATHY SHEEHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Charles Crumbley Sr., a onetime city sanitation worker who turned a one- truck rubbish collection business into a firm with a fleet of trucks, died Monday. He was 84 and lived in the Village section of North Philadelphia. Crumbley introduced the trash compactor truck to Philadelphia in the 1950s. Despite his age, Crumbley, founder and owner of Charles Crumbley Inc., continued working nearly seven days a week until he fell ill about three weeks ago. "He would come down every morning at 6 o'clock and oversee everything.
NEWS
November 17, 1988 | By Charles McCurdy, Special to The Inquirer
Port Henley, a 16-acre project along the Schuylkill and abutting the Borough of Bridgeport that has been delayed for more than five years, may get a new lease on life if Upper Merion's Zoning Hearing Board decides to extend several variances for another year. Real estate developer John S. Trinsey Jr. of Royersford started planning the construction of three apartment buildings for senior citizens on the property in 1982. He needed the variances to construct that type of housing, with accompanying dining and recreation facilities, within the flood plain of the river and closer to the property's borders than the township usually allows.
NEWS
November 12, 2011
The parents of a Sewell freshman who died mysteriously in 2006 can continue their wrongful-death lawsuit against the College of New Jersey, a judge ruled Thursday. Susan and John Fiocco claim lax security may have allowed a stranger to enter a dormitory on the Ewing, N.J., campus and kill their 19-year-old son, John Jr. Fiocco's blood was found around a trash compactor, and his body was found in a Bucks County landfill a month later. Police have made no arrests in the case. A Superior Court judge ruled that the college was not shielded from liability because a jury could conclude the school was negligent or allowed a dangerous situation to exist.
NEWS
November 17, 2006 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A student at the College of New Jersey earlier this week overheard another student discussing a game of hide-and-seek that may have been played inside a freshman dormitory during the early morning hours of March 25, when freshman John Fiocco Jr. went missing. That tip, passed on to state police, led officials in a different direction this week in their investigation into what happened to Fiocco, whose blood was found in a Wolfe Hall trash bin and whose mangled body was discovered in a Bucks County landfill a month after he disappeared.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
When he's not cycling through his repertoire of Mozart and Brahms concertos, pianist Peter Serkin often pushes concertgoers into seriously unknown regions, invariably to everyone's benefit. His collaboration with the Orion Quartet on Friday at the Kimmel Center seemed not to frighten off Philadelphia Chamber Music Society patrons, even though much of the program was taken up with Max Reger's little-known Piano Quartet Op. 133 and Schoenberg's Chamber Symphony transcribed for keyboard and strings.
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Luciano Berio's Sequenzas are such forbidding music, hearing all in one sitting could make your ears fall off. Instead, one felt incredibly lucky to encounter all of them played amid playful, quirky art installations in separate rooms at First Unitarian Church in 14 Sequenzas . These dense, atonal works by one of the great 20th-century modernists sound like cadenzas too wild for any concerto. Instigated by A Change of Harp, coproduced by Bowerbird, and presented by the 2014 FringeArts festival for three nights starting Thursday, 14 Sequenzas is about showcasing this music amid poetic, visual stimulation but also offering audiences graceful-exit options from some of the more aggressive pieces, said the event's mastermind, harpist Elizabeth Morgan-Ellis.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying he failed to return all of their security deposit, the owners of The Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News, and Philly.com have sued Bart Blatstein, the developer who bought their former building at 400 N. Broad St. "It appears, and we allege, that he misappropriated the money," the company's attorney, Thomas A. Leonard, said. The company gave Blatstein $340,500 for a security deposit, with the proviso that he keep it in a separate account. The lawsuit said Blatstein mingled the deposit with his other funds.
NEWS
January 20, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTA - A 20-year-old maintenance worker who this week pleaded guilty to molesting and killing a 7-year-old girl was found dead of an apparent suicide in his prison cell yesterday, according to the Georgia Department of Corrections. Ryan Brunn was found unresponsive at 4:15 p.m. at the state prison in Jackson, said spokeswoman Kristen Stancil. Brunn was taken to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 5:37 p.m., Stancil said in an email to the Associated Press. She gave no other details about how he died.
NEWS
November 12, 2011
The parents of a Sewell freshman who died mysteriously in 2006 can continue their wrongful-death lawsuit against the College of New Jersey, a judge ruled Thursday. Susan and John Fiocco claim lax security may have allowed a stranger to enter a dormitory on the Ewing, N.J., campus and kill their 19-year-old son, John Jr. Fiocco's blood was found around a trash compactor, and his body was found in a Bucks County landfill a month later. Police have made no arrests in the case. A Superior Court judge ruled that the college was not shielded from liability because a jury could conclude the school was negligent or allowed a dangerous situation to exist.
NEWS
May 24, 2011 | Associated Press
NEW YORK - A newborn tossed down a housing project's trash chute survived the eight-story fall because he landed on a pile of garbage and the compactor was jammed, investigators said yesterday. A maintenance worker heard a baby's cries coming from the trash compactor in the Walt Whitman Houses on Sunday morning. The child was taken to Brooklyn Hospital, where he remained in stable condition, said a spokesman for the Brooklyn District Attorney's Office. He said the baby did not appear to have been injured in the fall.
NEWS
July 21, 2010 | By ALAN BUTKOVITZ
IT'S TROUBLING that, in a recent editorial, the Daily News would so readily dismiss as a "technical issue" the highly questionable awarding of a sole-source contract that has now cost taxpayers $3.2 million for the purchase of 768 high-tech trash compactors. These compactors were purchased for $3,700 each - and cost taxpayers more than $200,000 in lost savings so far - an amount that could grow to as much as $500,000 when additional units are eventually delivered. Sole-source contracts skirt the usual bidding process and are only permitted for unique items that can only be purchased from one vendor and can't be competitively bid on the open market.
NEWS
July 13, 2010 | By JOSH FERNANDEZ, fernanj@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
THE CITY might have been better off keeping its old $100 wire trash baskets - and throwing away the contract to buy 710 new solar-powered trash compactors. That's according to the City Controller's Office, which released a report yesterday claiming the BigBelly compactors aren't as good a deal as city and company officials promised, and that contracting rules were broken. The purchase of 500 compactors and 210 recycling units for more than $2.1 million from BigBelly Solar - or about $3,700 each - were meant to reduce collection costs by 70 percent.
NEWS
July 11, 2008 | By Ashwin Verghese INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City leaders cut the ribbon on a new solar-powered trash receptacle yesterday and then, appropriately, threw the ribbon away. The ribbon-cutting in Center City came during the unveiling of the BigBelly, a trash receptacle and compactor that can store four times the volume of ordinary litter baskets and cut fuel use and greenhouse emissions from trash collection by 80 percent. To top it all off, the waste container can run daily on the amount of energy needed to toast a slice of bread.
NEWS
November 17, 2006 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A student at the College of New Jersey earlier this week overheard another student discussing a game of hide-and-seek that may have been played inside a freshman dormitory during the early morning hours of March 25, when freshman John Fiocco Jr. went missing. That tip, passed on to state police, led officials in a different direction this week in their investigation into what happened to Fiocco, whose blood was found in a Wolfe Hall trash bin and whose mangled body was discovered in a Bucks County landfill a month after he disappeared.
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