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NEWS
September 11, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
IN PREPARATION for Pope Francis' visit to Philadelphia, towing - a/k/a vehicular rapture - will begin on Center City streets in the "secure perimeter" and the "secure vehicle perimeter" of the "Francis Festival Grounds" on Sept. 20 and continue through to Sept. 23, city officials announced yesterday. About 1,500 free parking spots will be available at a Pattison Avenue lot for those who live within the perimeters and an additional 2,000 spaces in six garages across the city will be available for $20 to residents in the perimeters through the Philadelphia Parking Authority.
NEWS
September 10, 2015
LIKE CHRISTINE Flowers, I also was not raised in an Italian-Catholic home, because my Italian mother married my English father, who also embraced suburbia. And like Ms. Flowers, I was also blessed with a traditional Italian grandmother. I might add that my grandmother's plastic furniture encasement actually escaped the house itself and continued on to the seats of my grandfather's 1955 Pontiac. As a young child I vividly remember sleeping at her home one stormy night. I woke up crying.
NEWS
September 4, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
"WE HAVE several guests who have likened the situation with fences and snipes on rooftops as 'The Philadelphia Hunger Games' or 'The Philadelphia Divergent,' " one business owner wrote. " . . . the news nationwide could move from politics to the 'nightmare in Philly staring [sic] Mayor Nutter,' " added another. "We expect . . . [we] will be mostly used as a public bathroom," wrote a third. Those are just a few of the more dramatic comments city Controller Alan Butkovitz and his team received from the 68 businesses within the "Francis Festival Grounds," that responded to his office's recent survey about the impact of Pope Francis' upcoming visit.
NEWS
August 12, 2015 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writer rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
ASK A CITY trashman or woman what's the nastiest part of the job or the worst thing that's ever happened, and the answer is not easy. Because there's just so much, especially in the summer: The asphalt is hot enough to melt the soles of work boots. The stink can churn an iron stomach. The maggots are celebrating their new life. The bees treat you like a pin cushion. The open-air drug dealers stop you and say, "Hold up, don't dump that can. " And yes, it's summertime and indeed the livin' is easy - for raccoons, opossums, rats and mice.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sen. Robert P. Casey (D., Pa.) introduced legislation Wednesday that could change how waste is moved between states, potentially reducing the amount that ends up in Pennsylvania landfills. The bill, known as the Trash Reduction and Sensible Handling Act of 2015, would allow states to set their own standards for handling waste, and require that all waste shipped in from other states meets those standards. It would also allow states to impose fees for collecting waste from out of state even if the incoming waste met the host state's standards.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | BY RYAN BRIGGS, The Next Mayor rbriggs@philly.com
THIS IS the second in a series that The Next Mayor project is embarking on throughout the summer that looks at some of the problems facing Philadelphia's next mayor. We'll identify problems, examine why they exist, and find best practices implemented elsewhere. At the end of each piece, we'll offer a fix. The problem Talmadge Belo Jr. remembers North Philadelphia's golden days - a time when people washed the front steps of their tidy rowhouses, pitched in to sweep litter off the street and painted sidewalk curbs bright white.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Stu Eli and Janet Morales started an online store called Three Potato Four in 2007, they quickly became known for their handpicked vintage finds, garnering loyal customers and national press. Then, a few years ago, the markets where they sourced those goods underwent a radical change. "A lot of TV shows came out - American Pickers , Storage Wars . That changed the marketplace, and a lot of weekend-warrior antiques dealers changed the whole price structure," Eli said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2015 | BY JENELLE JANCI, Daily News Staff Writer jancij@phillynews.com, 215-568-5906
CANDY WRAPPERS, pregnancy tests, Halloween decorations and more beer cans than you can imagine - Bradley Maule has collected it all over the course of a year during his weekly hikes through Wissahickon Valley Park. And now, he's ready to display his findings. All 3,768 of them. Maule's "One Man's Trash" project launched in January 2014 in hopes of bringing attention to litter in Wissahickon Valley Park. The PhillySkyline.com founder and Hidden City co-editor started the project because he was appalled by the amount of trash he saw in the Northwest Philly arm of Fairmount Park along Wissahickon Creek.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bradley Maule will not be exhibiting the banana peels and dog poop bags, the tissues and condoms, the huge wooden pallet, the old tires, the sofa bed, the pile of broken Adirondack chairs, or the "two gigantic plastic PVC pipes. " Organics and big, big stuff are out, he said. But never fear, there's plenty of weirdness. When Maule unveils his Wissahickon Valley Park booty - collected over the course of a year's worth of weekly woodland rambles - for exhibition Wednesday, Earth Day, devotees of the strange will not be disappointed.
NEWS
April 14, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE LITTLE PATCH of woods off 59th Street near Cobbs Creek is a place where people drink beer, have sex in the dirt and dump their trash. Dozens of tall cans of cheap beer, a few condom wrappers and old, wet clothes were scattered there yesterday afternoon, right near a line of police tape that stretched from tree to tree. The blanket that Nyia Parler allegedly used to cover her quadriplegic son before she abandoned him there last week was gone. The Bible she allegedly left on his chest, perhaps hoping a higher power could sort it all out, was gone, too. Parler, 41, of Baltimore Avenue near Alden Street in West Philly, left her son, Daequan Norman, in those woods about a quarter-mile from her home last Monday morning, police said.
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