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NEWS
October 29, 2012 | By Kristen A. Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sandy means business, Mayor Nutter said in a press briefing Sunday night. Nutter said he had spoken to Federal Emergency Management Agency officials, who told him to expect a Category 1 hurricane. "The intensity is not lessening," the mayor said. "It's actually strengthening. Every concern that we've laid out for the past couple of days is in fact real. " Nutter said he had been told to expect five to 10 inches of rain in a fairly short period of time – the equivalent, he said, of over five feet of snow.
NEWS
October 23, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
POINT PLEASANT BEACH, N.J. - Fall at the Jersey Shore means the crowds have gone, the water is cooler - and things like a plastic heel from a shoe, a surgical mask and toothbrush heads can be found on the sand. Clean Ocean Action held its annual fall beach cleanups in 60 spots up and down the Jersey Shore, removing thousands of items that were either left behind by beachgoers or that washed up with the tides after being discarded elsewhere. On Sandy Hook alone, volunteers picked up: nearly 3,500 food and candy wrappers; 142 rubber balloons; 3,300 plastic straws and stirrers; more than 100 plastic light sticks; and nearly 600 plastic forks, knives and spoons.
NEWS
October 20, 2012 | By Jonathan Lai, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A mother who abandoned her newborn baby girl in a cardboard box four days before Christmas last year was found guilty of endangering the welfare of a child Friday but acquitted of attempted murder. Patricia Crawley, 33, of Philadelphia, was also convicted of reckless endangerment and simple assault and acquitted of aggravated assault. She was arrested in February, tracked down by police after a custodian found her child, in a box in the trash outside of Rainbow Day Care Center at 26th and Huntingdon Streets in North Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, Daily News Staff Writer
THAT PLASTIC container you see floating in the Schuylkill? It will probably float away from Philly, but it's hardly gone forever. Along with other junk tossed into local waterways, it ends up in the ocean, where it breaks down into a soupy mush. Remember that next you have a hankering for sushi. Need a visual on this? The 5 Gyres Institute, a California nonprofit, is teaming up with United by Blue, a Philadelphia apparel company that is dedicated to cleaning up waterways around the country, to show people the effects of pollution during a presentation here Monday.
NEWS
October 11, 2012 | By Jeremy Roebuck, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jerry Sandusky's wife stood by her husband as a "man of very high morals" and trashed their adopted son for saying that he too was sexually abused by his father in a letter to the judge deciding her husband's fate. "People need to know what kind of person he is," wrote Dorothy "Dottie" Sandusky of son Matt, 33, in the document , sent two weeks after her husband's conviction and obtained by The Inquirer this week. The letter, dated July 9, characterizes Matt Sandusky as a mentally ill liar and thief and asks Judge John M. Cleland to discount her youngest son's allegations in determining a sentence for her husband.
NEWS
September 23, 2012 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
City officials said Friday that a formerly trash-strewn, city-owned vacant lot in Point Breeze that was cleaned and landscaped by a neighboring businessman can stay as it is. That is, until the city sells it. Edward Covington, executive director of the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority, spoke to reporters at the lot in the 1100 block of South 20th Street to address what has been a growing controversy for the city. Covington said that four parties - including the businessman who cleaned the lot, real estate developer Ori Feibush - have expressed interest in buying the lot. The authority will take steps in the coming weeks to sell it, Covington said.
SPORTS
September 5, 2012 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
THERE ARE thousands upon thousands of him out there. That's what David Sims figures. Thousand upon thousands of guys who could run as fast as he can, hit as hard as he can, score on those tests they use to determine football players as high as he can. Thousands of guys who instead have settled into mundane jobs inside of the towns they once thrilled as teenage football stars. They were too much like him. Too much like who he used to be. Too proud to take the big hit to the big ego that junior college or an extra year at some type of prep school entailed.
NEWS
August 14, 2012 | By Phillip Lucas and Daily News Staff Writer
A NONPROFIT GROUP'S effort to keep litter off the streets of East Passyunk backfired when neighbors used trash bins to dump household garbage, electronics — even discarded furniture.   But the Passyunk Avenue Revitalization Corp.oration is fighting back, enlisting the help of the Streets Department's Streets and Walkways Education and Enforcement Program (SWEEP), as well as City Councilman Mark Squilla. After the city did away with wire trash bins and replaced them with Big Belly compactors on Passyunk Avenue, Samuel Sherman, PARC's executive director, bought 30 of the banished baskets to install in the area.
NEWS
July 30, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
Pennsylvania's Commonwealth Court should throw out the state's specious voter-ID law, or at least issue an injunction that recognizes there's no way that the state can provide the required credentials for hundreds of thousands of voters in time for the Nov. 6 election. That temporary step might buy the Corbett administration time, but it would in no way mitigate the obvious: that the ID law is nothing less than a political dirty trick aimed at tilting the playing field in favor of one party over another.
NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
BRIGANTINE, N.J. - People who sit on the beaches of Ventnor, Wildwood, and Atlantic City - where the ice cream man will put his box down and hand over a banana Fudge Bomb without your even moving, except to find the money - might be shocked to learn that in Brigantine, people lack this fundamental Jersey Shore right. And that, for the most part, they do not care. But that, possibly as early as next week, when the City Council is scheduled to vote on a seven-page ice cream ordinance 15 years in the making, they could at last be granted the right of beach ice-cream sales.
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