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Traumatic Encephalopathy

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SPORTS
May 3, 2011 | Associated Press
With its players again barred from work, the NFL told a federal appeals court Monday the fight over whether the lockout is legal won't get in the way of the 2011 season. The rest of the labor fight? That's anyone's guess. The league filed an 18-page brief with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit in St. Louis, arguing that the lockout should remain in effect permanently while appeals play out. The appeals court put U.S. District Judge Susan Richard Nelson's order lifting the 45-day lockout on hold temporarily last week.
SPORTS
May 3, 2011 | Daily News Wire Services
Dave Duerson, a former NFL player who committed suicide in February, had "moderately advanced" brain damage related to blows to the head, according to the researcher who made the diagnosis. "It's indisputable" that Duerson had chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a disorder linked to repeated brain trauma, Dr. Ann McKee said yesterday. The findings were announced as part of an effort conducted by the Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy at Boston University's School of Medicine.
SPORTS
December 9, 2011
The likelihood of Peyton Manning 's returning to action for the Colts in 2011 is fading fast. Colts owner Jim Irsay told WXIN-TV in Indianapolis on Thursday that he doesn't "envision Peyton playing this season. " Manning's still on the Colts' active roster while rehabbing from September neck surgery. "These things take time," Irsay told WRTV-TV, via the Indianapolis Star. "The best doctors can't predict. People often think someone knows for sure, and the answer is only time will tell.
SPORTS
September 15, 2010 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Concussions may be just "the tip of the iceberg," a Boston University researcher said Tuesday about how head traumas affect the brain. "It's these repetitive blows to the brain that we now have to take very seriously," said Robert Stern, codirector of the Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy at the Boston University School of Medicine. It was that center which determined that former Penn football player Owen Thomas showed the beginning stages of a degenerative disease caused by repeated head trauma.
NEWS
May 30, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the 1970s, during eight years as a safety with the Atlanta Falcons, Charles "Ray" Easterling lived in a world bound only by the rules and dimensions of the football field. By last August, Easterling's world was limited to the walls of his Richmond rancher by a brain so battered he forgot why he walked into a room by the time he got there. It was then that Easterling and his wife, Mary Ann, - joined by six other retired players including ex-Eagles quarterback Jim McMahon and offensive lineman Gerry Feehery, and four spouses - sued the NFL seeking lifetime medical monitoring for ex-players.
SPORTS
December 21, 2009 | Associated Press
The NFL is partnering with Boston University brain researchers who have been critical of the league's stance on concussions, the Associated Press learned yesterday. The league now plans to encourage current and former NFL players to agree to donate their brains to the Boston University Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy, which has said it found links between repeated head trauma and brain damage in boxers, football players and, most recently, a former NHL player. "It's huge that the NFL actively gets behind this research," said Robert Cantu, a co-director of the BU center who has spoken negatively about the league in the past.
SPORTS
February 12, 2012 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
The debate and discussion over concussions and their consequences have moved beyond the spotlight of professional sports. According to neurologists, that's a good thing. In college, high school, and youth leagues, awareness is growing. "This is one of those slow awakenings of, 'There's a real problem, there's a real danger,' " said Doug Smith, director of the Center for Brain Injury and Repair at the University of Pennsylvania. Awareness of concussions and their lasting impact has grown among the general public in the last five years, he said.
SPORTS
September 16, 2010 | By MARK KRAM, kramm@phillynews.com
In assessing the revelations that a brain autopsy performed on former Penn football player Owen Thomas showed evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Dr. Robert Cantu told the Daily News that "if you were to score it on a scale of 1 to 10," the 21-year-old suicide victim had case that would have placed him at "1.5," or at the low end of the spectrum in terms of cases Cantu has evaluated as a co-director of the Center for the Study of...
SPORTS
February 2, 2010 | Daily News Wire Services
Mike Martz, the headstrong coach who orchestrated the "Greatest Show on Turf" while molding Kurt Warner into a Pro Bowl quarterback with the St. Louis Rams, is the Chicago Bears' new offensive coordinator. Martz's hiring yesterday ended a nearly monthlong search to replace the fired Ron Turner. His job is to turn around a struggling offense and get the most out of Jay Cutler after the quarterback and team failed to meet high expectations this season. Cutler threw a league-leading 26 interceptions after a blockbuster trade with Denver.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Kevin Turner
Football has always been a big part of my life. It's a game of toughness and character that teaches important lessons about teamwork and responsibility. But I believe it's my duty to speak out about what has happened to me and many other football players. As I continue to battle amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, I hope to draw attention to the problem of concussions in professional football. I am just one of many former players who suffer from devastating brain and other neurological injuries - injuries that could have been prevented if the NFL had been honest about the risks.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Kevin Turner
Football has always been a big part of my life. It's a game of toughness and character that teaches important lessons about teamwork and responsibility. But I believe it's my duty to speak out about what has happened to me and many other football players. As I continue to battle amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, I hope to draw attention to the problem of concussions in professional football. I am just one of many former players who suffer from devastating brain and other neurological injuries - injuries that could have been prevented if the NFL had been honest about the risks.
NEWS
May 30, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the 1970s, during eight years as a safety with the Atlanta Falcons, Charles "Ray" Easterling lived in a world bound only by the rules and dimensions of the football field. By last August, Easterling's world was limited to the walls of his Richmond rancher by a brain so battered he forgot why he walked into a room by the time he got there. It was then that Easterling and his wife, Mary Ann, - joined by six other retired players including ex-Eagles quarterback Jim McMahon and offensive lineman Gerry Feehery, and four spouses - sued the NFL seeking lifetime medical monitoring for ex-players.
SPORTS
February 12, 2012 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
The debate and discussion over concussions and their consequences have moved beyond the spotlight of professional sports. According to neurologists, that's a good thing. In college, high school, and youth leagues, awareness is growing. "This is one of those slow awakenings of, 'There's a real problem, there's a real danger,' " said Doug Smith, director of the Center for Brain Injury and Repair at the University of Pennsylvania. Awareness of concussions and their lasting impact has grown among the general public in the last five years, he said.
SPORTS
December 9, 2011
The likelihood of Peyton Manning 's returning to action for the Colts in 2011 is fading fast. Colts owner Jim Irsay told WXIN-TV in Indianapolis on Thursday that he doesn't "envision Peyton playing this season. " Manning's still on the Colts' active roster while rehabbing from September neck surgery. "These things take time," Irsay told WRTV-TV, via the Indianapolis Star. "The best doctors can't predict. People often think someone knows for sure, and the answer is only time will tell.
SPORTS
May 3, 2011 | Associated Press
With its players again barred from work, the NFL told a federal appeals court Monday the fight over whether the lockout is legal won't get in the way of the 2011 season. The rest of the labor fight? That's anyone's guess. The league filed an 18-page brief with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit in St. Louis, arguing that the lockout should remain in effect permanently while appeals play out. The appeals court put U.S. District Judge Susan Richard Nelson's order lifting the 45-day lockout on hold temporarily last week.
SPORTS
May 3, 2011 | Daily News Wire Services
Dave Duerson, a former NFL player who committed suicide in February, had "moderately advanced" brain damage related to blows to the head, according to the researcher who made the diagnosis. "It's indisputable" that Duerson had chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a disorder linked to repeated brain trauma, Dr. Ann McKee said yesterday. The findings were announced as part of an effort conducted by the Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy at Boston University's School of Medicine.
SPORTS
September 16, 2010 | By MARK KRAM, kramm@phillynews.com
In assessing the revelations that a brain autopsy performed on former Penn football player Owen Thomas showed evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Dr. Robert Cantu told the Daily News that "if you were to score it on a scale of 1 to 10," the 21-year-old suicide victim had case that would have placed him at "1.5," or at the low end of the spectrum in terms of cases Cantu has evaluated as a co-director of the Center for the Study of...
SPORTS
September 15, 2010 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Concussions may be just "the tip of the iceberg," a Boston University researcher said Tuesday about how head traumas affect the brain. "It's these repetitive blows to the brain that we now have to take very seriously," said Robert Stern, codirector of the Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy at the Boston University School of Medicine. It was that center which determined that former Penn football player Owen Thomas showed the beginning stages of a degenerative disease caused by repeated head trauma.
SPORTS
February 2, 2010 | Daily News Wire Services
Mike Martz, the headstrong coach who orchestrated the "Greatest Show on Turf" while molding Kurt Warner into a Pro Bowl quarterback with the St. Louis Rams, is the Chicago Bears' new offensive coordinator. Martz's hiring yesterday ended a nearly monthlong search to replace the fired Ron Turner. His job is to turn around a struggling offense and get the most out of Jay Cutler after the quarterback and team failed to meet high expectations this season. Cutler threw a league-leading 26 interceptions after a blockbuster trade with Denver.
SPORTS
December 21, 2009 | Associated Press
The NFL is partnering with Boston University brain researchers who have been critical of the league's stance on concussions, the Associated Press learned yesterday. The league now plans to encourage current and former NFL players to agree to donate their brains to the Boston University Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy, which has said it found links between repeated head trauma and brain damage in boxers, football players and, most recently, a former NHL player. "It's huge that the NFL actively gets behind this research," said Robert Cantu, a co-director of the BU center who has spoken negatively about the league in the past.
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