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TRAVEL
March 4, 2012 | By Stephen P. Nash, For The Inquirer
Maybe for one reason or another you've thought about staying in "eco-friendly" hotels when you travel, but you're not eager to join the League of Environmental Hairsplitters to figure out a conscientious choice. You're not unusual. The most recent industry survey of U.S. travelers - not at all intended to promote the idea - concluded just the same that "green is mainstream. " More than four in 10 considered environmental impact to be important when planning travel. To find out about environmental impact, there are a few useful shortcuts to consider.
NEWS
January 18, 1993 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / J. KYLE KEENER
There was a guest conductor at 30th Street Station yesterday morning. Mickey Rooney raised a "baton" to direct the High School for Creative and Performing Arts band, which greeted the actor and others when the Celebrity Train stopped in Philadelphia en route to Washington. The train trip started in New York, re-creating the ride taken in 1933 when Franklin Delano Roosevelt traveled to his inauguration. Some descendants of FDR were among the passengers yesterday.
NEWS
December 17, 1994
Grabbing a bite to eat at Philadelphia International Airport is a completely unsatisfying experience. The food is bad, the prices worse. Better to pick up a fresh pretzel from the vendor at the end of the Schuylkill Expressway than to overpay for a stale imitation from an airport snack bar. So we're pleased to know that Aramark company (formerly ARA Services) - currently responsible for the dreadful, overpriced food at airport concessions - has bowed out. Aramark will be replaced by Marketplace Development Center, a Boston-based airport developer, and Redwood Advisory, which operates the Shops at Liberty Place, and whose owner, Ricardo Dunston, did an excellent job some years ago as manager of the Gallery.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | By Sydney Trent, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fun doesn't have to end just because summer is over. The Delaware Valley is brimming with things to do in autumn. How about a drive through the covered bridges of Bucks County on a brilliant autumn day? There are few settings more stunning or romantic for viewing the fall foliage. And the Chrysanthemum Festival at Longwood Gardens in Chester County helps visitors forget that winter is on its way. Children are sure to enjoy a trip to Newlin Mill in Delaware County, where they can watch the giant white-oak wheel of the 18th-century grist mill turn as it grinds corn into meal.
NEWS
December 25, 1998 | Inquirer photographs by Peter Tobia
At the Philadelphia airport yesterday, holiday volume, combined with the wintry weather, added up to long waits for many.
NEWS
June 4, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Charles Fox
Supporters of an end to the U.S. embargo of Cuba held a festival in Camden last night for the Ninth Cuban Friendship Caravan. The caravan, which is traveling from Canada to Cuba, is collecting donations for distribution on the island.
NEWS
November 18, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
It's not here yet, but there may soon be a way to bypass those long lines at airport security checkpoints. The Federal Aviation Administration is looking at a plan to prescreen passengers who agree in advance to background checks. Those passengers would be issued "smart cards" to show at the screening area and pass through quickly. The plan would depend on a smart technology to verify the card holder's identity using a fingerprint or a retinal scan. The Air Transport Association, which represents the major airlines, has endorsed the smart card idea.
NEWS
January 16, 2011 | By Bill Reed, Inquirer Travel Editor
London, Barcelona, and Guatemala will be hot destinations this year. Travelers will look to customize their trips and to connect with people with similar interests. And airlines will package their annoying fees to make it easier - but not necessarily cheaper - to pay them. Those are a few 2011 travel tips from Pauline Frommer, creator of a popular series of 14 guidebooks for budget-conscious but comfort-craving travelers. Frommer has been traveling the world since she was 4 months old, touring Europe while her father, Arthur, updated Europe on 5 Dollars a Day , the revolutionary guidebook that first came out in 1957.
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Breaking News Desk
The holiday week forecast looks good for travelers, high school football games, and Black Friday shopping. For the Philadelphia area, the next five days look rain-free with highs in the mid to upper 50s and lows around 40. In outlying areas west and north of the city, however, freezing or near-freezing overnight temperatures are likely through the weekend, except on Friday night, when the low could be closer to 40. Saturday and Sunday, also...
NEWS
February 9, 2012 | By Jeff Plungis, Bloomberg News
WASHINGTON - Philadelphia International Airport and the three airports used by the Sept. 11 hijackers to initiate the terrorist attacks will be among 28 where preapproved frequent fliers can get through security faster as the Transportation Security Administration expands expedited screening. The expansion marks a potential shift in TSA screening processes begun after the 2001 attacks, said Jeffrey Sural, a former assistant TSA administator. "This is the beginning of a wholesale change to the screening experience," said Sural, now a lawyer and public-policy adviser.
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NEWS
October 31, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia imposes a mandatory quarantine three or four times a year for uncooperative people with tuberculosis and is planning to automatically seek a court order as a precaution if a patient is confirmed with Ebola, officials said. The city is monitoring about 40 travelers from West Africa who arrived at five designated airports in other parts of the country. An additional 20 or so, including 11 in Burlington County, are being followed at least daily in surrounding counties in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
All passengers arriving in the United States from Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea will now be required to fly into one of the five airports that have enhanced screening for the deadly Ebola virus, the Department of Homeland Security said Tuesday. The additional travel restrictions, designed to prevent the spread of Ebola, mean that travelers from the three West African countries hardest hit by the disease, if not flying into one of the five U.S. airports with increased screening, will have to rebook their flights.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five U.S. airports that receive the vast majority of travelers from the countries of West Africa hit hardest by Ebola will begin new screening procedures for passengers who may have been exposed to the deadly virus. Philadelphia International Airport is not one of them. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Wednesday that it would send staff to the five airports, starting Saturday at New York's John F. Kennedy Airport, which receives nearly half of all travelers to the United States from Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea.
NEWS
October 6, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sundance Vacations had a problem. Unhappy customers weren't just complaining to consumer agencies or regulators, where it was used to quietly settling or pushing back. Instead, many were connecting on Facebook - finding a "Boycott Sundance Vacations" page whose 2,200 thumbs-ups might as well be thumbs-downs. Today, a prospective customer who types "Sundance Vacations" into a search engine such as Google is likely to find the boycott page, managed by a group of activist critics, near the top of the results.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Getting through U.S. Customs checkpoints can be irritating at peak travel times, but some passengers arriving at Philadelphia International Airport got an extra dose of angst this week. New automated passport kiosks, designed to expedite the entry process, had a technology glitch. They didn't work for a while Tuesday afternoon and had to be rebooted at a busy time, when many US Airways and American Airlines flights were arriving from Europe. Travelers who had just spent from seven to nine hours in the air became frustrated, and anger boiled up because many had connecting flights.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
NOW THIS IS the way to travel! When the Johnsons returned from one trip - and it might have been anywhere from Alaska to Africa - they mapped out the next excursion. Edith Holt Johnson and her husband, Arthur L. Johnson, seemed always to be on the go, traveling with their friends, Cecil and Lytha Willis, whom they described as their "running partners. " Edith Johnson, who was a devoted and hardworking employee of a supermarket and meatpacking company, a dedicated churchwoman and loving matriarch, died Sept.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's summer's last fling. Roads will be jammed, trains crowded, and airplanes full. Ah, Labor Day weekend. Nearly 35 million Americans will travel 50 miles or more from home for end-of-summer celebrations, the highest volume for the holiday since 2008, said AAA, the nation's largest auto club. The majority, 29.7 million, will drive. While that travel is good for the economy, thousands will be frustrated by longer travel times, congestion, delays, and the lack of alternative transportation options, according to the U.S. Travel Association.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Too bad a sparkling blue train with a mighty engine isn't around to deliver thousands of tourists to Atlantic City. There once was. The Blue Comet had streaked across the length of New Jersey, bringing 367,000 passengers to America's Playground in a run that began a few months before the Great Depression hit in 1929 and that ended a dozen years later. So where is this iconic train now, at a time when the troubled seashore resort searches desperately for new ways to again be a destination?
REAL_ESTATE
July 14, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
There's a small sign in Vicki D. Lachman's kitchen in Avalon. It bears four words: "No hurries, no worries. " What power and meaning those words have for Lachman, newly retired from her job as a professor of professional ethics at Drexel University, but hardly idle as she makes the transition to a less active professional life. Down in Avalon, near a stretch of boardwalk and beach and close enough to hear the sound of the ocean, Lachman, 68, looks back on a fulfilling life, and forward to a new chapter she is writing as she goes.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Pennsylvania State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo, on probation for his corruption conviction, can travel a bit more freely under a ruling issued Wednesday by a federal judge. U.S. District Judge Ronald L. Buckwalter dropped the standard requirement that Fumo obtain advance approval from his probation officer before each long-distance trip. But he said Fumo would have to file an itinerary each Monday with the probation office listing all of his planned trips for the week ahead. Fumo had asked Buckwalter, who presided over the trial in which a jury found him guilty of all 137 counts in a sweeping indictment against him, to let him travel without any advance approvals.
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