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TRAVEL
March 4, 2012 | By Stephen P. Nash, For The Inquirer
Maybe for one reason or another you've thought about staying in "eco-friendly" hotels when you travel, but you're not eager to join the League of Environmental Hairsplitters to figure out a conscientious choice. You're not unusual. The most recent industry survey of U.S. travelers - not at all intended to promote the idea - concluded just the same that "green is mainstream. " More than four in 10 considered environmental impact to be important when planning travel. To find out about environmental impact, there are a few useful shortcuts to consider.
NEWS
January 18, 1993 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / J. KYLE KEENER
There was a guest conductor at 30th Street Station yesterday morning. Mickey Rooney raised a "baton" to direct the High School for Creative and Performing Arts band, which greeted the actor and others when the Celebrity Train stopped in Philadelphia en route to Washington. The train trip started in New York, re-creating the ride taken in 1933 when Franklin Delano Roosevelt traveled to his inauguration. Some descendants of FDR were among the passengers yesterday.
NEWS
December 17, 1994
Grabbing a bite to eat at Philadelphia International Airport is a completely unsatisfying experience. The food is bad, the prices worse. Better to pick up a fresh pretzel from the vendor at the end of the Schuylkill Expressway than to overpay for a stale imitation from an airport snack bar. So we're pleased to know that Aramark company (formerly ARA Services) - currently responsible for the dreadful, overpriced food at airport concessions - has bowed out. Aramark will be replaced by Marketplace Development Center, a Boston-based airport developer, and Redwood Advisory, which operates the Shops at Liberty Place, and whose owner, Ricardo Dunston, did an excellent job some years ago as manager of the Gallery.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | By Sydney Trent, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fun doesn't have to end just because summer is over. The Delaware Valley is brimming with things to do in autumn. How about a drive through the covered bridges of Bucks County on a brilliant autumn day? There are few settings more stunning or romantic for viewing the fall foliage. And the Chrysanthemum Festival at Longwood Gardens in Chester County helps visitors forget that winter is on its way. Children are sure to enjoy a trip to Newlin Mill in Delaware County, where they can watch the giant white-oak wheel of the 18th-century grist mill turn as it grinds corn into meal.
NEWS
December 25, 1998 | Inquirer photographs by Peter Tobia
At the Philadelphia airport yesterday, holiday volume, combined with the wintry weather, added up to long waits for many.
NEWS
June 4, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Charles Fox
Supporters of an end to the U.S. embargo of Cuba held a festival in Camden last night for the Ninth Cuban Friendship Caravan. The caravan, which is traveling from Canada to Cuba, is collecting donations for distribution on the island.
NEWS
November 18, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
It's not here yet, but there may soon be a way to bypass those long lines at airport security checkpoints. The Federal Aviation Administration is looking at a plan to prescreen passengers who agree in advance to background checks. Those passengers would be issued "smart cards" to show at the screening area and pass through quickly. The plan would depend on a smart technology to verify the card holder's identity using a fingerprint or a retinal scan. The Air Transport Association, which represents the major airlines, has endorsed the smart card idea.
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Breaking News Desk
The holiday week forecast looks good for travelers, high school football games, and Black Friday shopping. For the Philadelphia area, the next five days look rain-free with highs in the mid to upper 50s and lows around 40. In outlying areas west and north of the city, however, freezing or near-freezing overnight temperatures are likely through the weekend, except on Friday night, when the low could be closer to 40. Saturday and Sunday, also...
NEWS
May 9, 1997 | By John Way Jennings, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 21-year-old Gloucester County man was arrested yesterday by FBI agents and Franklin Township police on a federal complaint that he transported approximately $500,000 in stolen travelers checks and money orders over state lines. Special Agent Linda Brookman Vizi, a spokeswoman for the Philadelphia Office of the FBI, said Joel Kotler was arrested at 7 a.m. at a residence he was renting on Township Line Drive in Franklinville. Vizi said authorities recovered a stolen 1996 Ford Probe at that location.
NEWS
January 28, 1990 | By Al Haas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard Saul Wurman is an architect and graphic designer best known for his attempts to make information more accessible. His efforts in behalf of ready access have ranged from redesigning the Pacific Bell Yellow Pages to writing Information Anxiety, the best-selling guide to handling the latter-day information glut. With the expertise he obtained developing his Access Guides to cities like Tokyo, Paris and New York, and his passion for atlases, Wurman set about reshaping the U.S. road atlas in a sensible, "user-friendly" way. The result is a new tool for travelers called USATLAS (Prentice Hall, paperback, $12.95)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 14, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Get a good look at Danny Kean - pounding the keys as his dog, Mo, snoozes atop his piano, jammed in the bed of his old red pickup truck. Because he won't be in Philadelphia for long. Gray-haired and goateed, Kean may be the last of the hard-core troubadours. He talks fast, thinks deep, and moves on. He has no home, no job, and no money. What he's got is a 1987 Toyota, three-quarters of a tank of gas, and a belief that bringing piano music to people across the continent affords them, and him, a certain kind of enlightenment.
NEWS
August 4, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT & WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writers brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
Update: TORONTO (AP) - The Canadian talking and tweeting hitchhiking robot that met its untimely end in the United States over the weekend might be given another chance at life. HitchBOT's co-creators Frauke Zeller and David Smith said Monday that they've been overwhelmed with support and offers to revive the robot since it was vandalized beyond repair on the streets of Philadelphia on Saturday and they are considering rebuilding it. The robot was on a hitchhiking, social experiment adventure in the U.S. after trekking across Canada and parts of Europe last year.
NEWS
August 4, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
After successful treks across Europe and its native Canada, a child-size hitchhiking robot had made its way via rides with friendly humans all the way from Boston to New York City to the streets of Philadelphia. Whereupon, its makers say, it was mugged and dismembered on Saturday. The Canada-based creators of "hitchBOT" said they received the dispiriting news when they received a photo Saturday night of the smashed-up robot. They believe someone took it apart early Saturday morning.
NEWS
August 1, 2015
ISSUE | FRACKING Question time It would be easier for me to support state House Speaker Mike Turzai's position opposing the implementation of a severance tax on shale gas if he would answer two questions ("Progress slows in Pa. budget talk," July 28). First, how would the drilling companies actually move our natural-gas deposits to a more tax-friendly state? And where, exactly, is such a state? Sure, I know the answers: The gas can't be moved, and there is no gas-producing state that does not have a severance tax. |Ken Rosenberg, Rydal, krosenberg47@comcast.net Inconclusive studies Like much of the hype surrounding studies regarding hydraulic fracturing, recent reporting lacked proper consideration of the studies' weaknesses and shortcomings, many of which were acknowledged by researchers ("Studies link fracking, health woes," July 16)
NEWS
July 23, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Americans travelled more highway miles through May than during the first five months of any previous year, the U.S. Department of Transportation said Tuesday. The department warned that "increased gridlock nationwide can be expected unless changes are made in the near-term" to expand highway capacity or shift travel from roads. The new record of 1.26 trillion miles topped the previous record of 1.23 trillion miles set in May 2007. The new data showed that Americans drove 275.1 billion miles in May, the most ever in May of any year.
NEWS
July 15, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
GOD KNOWS we all make mistakes, but there's one phrase you probably should never utter at an airport-security checkpoint: "Ohhh man, I forgot that was in there!" (OK, also maybe a few others, like anything that involves cupping your hands around your mouth and yelling, "Hey everybody . . . !" But we digress.) In the post-9/11 world, firearms and explosives obviously sit at the top of any list of items that can't be stuffed into your carry-on bag. But statistics show that the number of firearms confiscated at airport-security checkpoints across the country has been climbing steadily for seven years, according to the Transportation Security Administration.
NEWS
July 5, 2015 | By Sarai Flores, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carl Adams, 49, of Southwest Philadelphia, has been homeless for much of the past year, since he was released from prison. "When I got out, family and friends were gone," Adams said. Despite lacking a home and family, Adams got an important boost last week: a makeover from a traveling salon that provides free hair washes, cuts, color, and styling. In preparation for a meeting with a lawyer, Adams got a beard trim and a haircut in a blue-and-white trailer in the parking lot of the Sunday Breakfast Rescue Mission, on 13th Street north of Vine Street.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia hosted 8 percent fewer international travelers last year, but is expecting a surge from the upcoming World Meeting of Families and papal visit, convention officials said Monday. The Department of Commerce, which measures overseas visitors to U.S. cities and states, said Philadelphia drew 620,000 foreign visitors in 2014, down from 673,000 in 2013. The city ranked No. 15 among the 20 most popular U.S. destinations. Pennsylvania ranked No. 10 in foreign visitors, with 964,000 international travelers, down 3 percent from the 993,000 in 2013.
SPORTS
June 22, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sunday night, after another grueling journey to another off-the-radar tournament in another remote locale, Alexandra Riley will return to her hotel room and end Father's Day the way she ends most other days, by texting "Good Night!" to her father. The nightly ritual helps ease both her father's concerns and the isolation the Philadelphia-born pro feels as, all alone, she chases her tennis dream across the globe. For seven years now, since she was 17, "Xan" Riley has been a solo tennis nomad.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Somewhere in a remote part of Canada, antennae are likely picking up the signals of 100 shorebirds that just weeks ago were on the beaches of Delaware Bay, where they were caught with giant nets and fitted with tiny transmitters. The birds are robin-size creatures called red knots. After precipitous declines in their population on the bay - from about 100,000 birds in the 1990s to about 12,000 a few years ago - federal officials designated them as threatened in December. Researchers know that red knots have one of the longest migrations on the planet - from the tip of South America to their breeding grounds in the Arctic.
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