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TRAVEL
March 4, 2012 | By Stephen P. Nash, For The Inquirer
Maybe for one reason or another you've thought about staying in "eco-friendly" hotels when you travel, but you're not eager to join the League of Environmental Hairsplitters to figure out a conscientious choice. You're not unusual. The most recent industry survey of U.S. travelers - not at all intended to promote the idea - concluded just the same that "green is mainstream. " More than four in 10 considered environmental impact to be important when planning travel. To find out about environmental impact, there are a few useful shortcuts to consider.
NEWS
January 18, 1993 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / J. KYLE KEENER
There was a guest conductor at 30th Street Station yesterday morning. Mickey Rooney raised a "baton" to direct the High School for Creative and Performing Arts band, which greeted the actor and others when the Celebrity Train stopped in Philadelphia en route to Washington. The train trip started in New York, re-creating the ride taken in 1933 when Franklin Delano Roosevelt traveled to his inauguration. Some descendants of FDR were among the passengers yesterday.
NEWS
December 17, 1994
Grabbing a bite to eat at Philadelphia International Airport is a completely unsatisfying experience. The food is bad, the prices worse. Better to pick up a fresh pretzel from the vendor at the end of the Schuylkill Expressway than to overpay for a stale imitation from an airport snack bar. So we're pleased to know that Aramark company (formerly ARA Services) - currently responsible for the dreadful, overpriced food at airport concessions - has bowed out. Aramark will be replaced by Marketplace Development Center, a Boston-based airport developer, and Redwood Advisory, which operates the Shops at Liberty Place, and whose owner, Ricardo Dunston, did an excellent job some years ago as manager of the Gallery.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | By Sydney Trent, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fun doesn't have to end just because summer is over. The Delaware Valley is brimming with things to do in autumn. How about a drive through the covered bridges of Bucks County on a brilliant autumn day? There are few settings more stunning or romantic for viewing the fall foliage. And the Chrysanthemum Festival at Longwood Gardens in Chester County helps visitors forget that winter is on its way. Children are sure to enjoy a trip to Newlin Mill in Delaware County, where they can watch the giant white-oak wheel of the 18th-century grist mill turn as it grinds corn into meal.
NEWS
December 25, 1998 | Inquirer photographs by Peter Tobia
At the Philadelphia airport yesterday, holiday volume, combined with the wintry weather, added up to long waits for many.
NEWS
June 4, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Charles Fox
Supporters of an end to the U.S. embargo of Cuba held a festival in Camden last night for the Ninth Cuban Friendship Caravan. The caravan, which is traveling from Canada to Cuba, is collecting donations for distribution on the island.
NEWS
November 18, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
It's not here yet, but there may soon be a way to bypass those long lines at airport security checkpoints. The Federal Aviation Administration is looking at a plan to prescreen passengers who agree in advance to background checks. Those passengers would be issued "smart cards" to show at the screening area and pass through quickly. The plan would depend on a smart technology to verify the card holder's identity using a fingerprint or a retinal scan. The Air Transport Association, which represents the major airlines, has endorsed the smart card idea.
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Breaking News Desk
The holiday week forecast looks good for travelers, high school football games, and Black Friday shopping. For the Philadelphia area, the next five days look rain-free with highs in the mid to upper 50s and lows around 40. In outlying areas west and north of the city, however, freezing or near-freezing overnight temperatures are likely through the weekend, except on Friday night, when the low could be closer to 40. Saturday and Sunday, also...
NEWS
January 16, 2011 | By Bill Reed, Inquirer Travel Editor
London, Barcelona, and Guatemala will be hot destinations this year. Travelers will look to customize their trips and to connect with people with similar interests. And airlines will package their annoying fees to make it easier - but not necessarily cheaper - to pay them. Those are a few 2011 travel tips from Pauline Frommer, creator of a popular series of 14 guidebooks for budget-conscious but comfort-craving travelers. Frommer has been traveling the world since she was 4 months old, touring Europe while her father, Arthur, updated Europe on 5 Dollars a Day , the revolutionary guidebook that first came out in 1957.
NEWS
February 9, 2012 | By Jeff Plungis, Bloomberg News
WASHINGTON - Philadelphia International Airport and the three airports used by the Sept. 11 hijackers to initiate the terrorist attacks will be among 28 where preapproved frequent fliers can get through security faster as the Transportation Security Administration expands expedited screening. The expansion marks a potential shift in TSA screening processes begun after the 2001 attacks, said Jeffrey Sural, a former assistant TSA administator. "This is the beginning of a wholesale change to the screening experience," said Sural, now a lawyer and public-policy adviser.
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BUSINESS
August 28, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's summer's last fling. Roads will be jammed, trains crowded, and airplanes full. Ah, Labor Day weekend. Nearly 35 million Americans will travel 50 miles or more from home for end-of-summer celebrations, the highest volume for the holiday since 2008, said AAA, the nation's largest auto club. The majority, 29.7 million, will drive. While that travel is good for the economy, thousands will be frustrated by longer travel times, congestion, delays, and the lack of alternative transportation options, according to the U.S. Travel Association.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Too bad a sparkling blue train with a mighty engine isn't around to deliver thousands of tourists to Atlantic City. There once was. The Blue Comet had streaked across the length of New Jersey, bringing 367,000 passengers to America's Playground in a run that began a few months before the Great Depression hit in 1929 and that ended a dozen years later. So where is this iconic train now, at a time when the troubled seashore resort searches desperately for new ways to again be a destination?
REAL_ESTATE
July 14, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
There's a small sign in Vicki D. Lachman's kitchen in Avalon. It bears four words: "No hurries, no worries. " What power and meaning those words have for Lachman, newly retired from her job as a professor of professional ethics at Drexel University, but hardly idle as she makes the transition to a less active professional life. Down in Avalon, near a stretch of boardwalk and beach and close enough to hear the sound of the ocean, Lachman, 68, looks back on a fulfilling life, and forward to a new chapter she is writing as she goes.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Pennsylvania State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo, on probation for his corruption conviction, can travel a bit more freely under a ruling issued Wednesday by a federal judge. U.S. District Judge Ronald L. Buckwalter dropped the standard requirement that Fumo obtain advance approval from his probation officer before each long-distance trip. But he said Fumo would have to file an itinerary each Monday with the probation office listing all of his planned trips for the week ahead. Fumo had asked Buckwalter, who presided over the trial in which a jury found him guilty of all 137 counts in a sweeping indictment against him, to let him travel without any advance approvals.
NEWS
July 4, 2014 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal prosecutors objected Wednesday to a request by former Pennsylvania State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo to travel without advance approval. "There is no reason that defendant Fumo should be treated differently than any other defendant, simply because he owns or controls more homes than the average convicted defendant," Assistant U.S. Attorney Robert A. Zauzmer wrote in a court filing. Zauzmer, a key member of the team that brought the case leading to Fumo's conviction on corruption charges, urged U.S. District Court Judge Ronald L. Buckwalter to reject Fumo's request to travel long distances without getting permission from his probation officer.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
More Americans will travel this Fourth of July for fireworks, barbecues, and the beach visits, despite the highest gasoline prices for Independence Day since 2008. Automobile travel is projected to be at its highest level in years, with more than eight in 10 travelers celebrating the three-day weekend with a road trip, said AAA, the nation's largest automobile club. Forty-one million Americans will journey 50 miles or more from home, a 1.9 percent increase over 2013. The majority, or 34.8 million, plan to drive.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2014
I LOVE traveling and the world of opportunities and advantages it offers, and sometime in the near future I plan to resume my former globe-trotting ways. But a friend's recent health scare during a trip made me realize just how hazardous travel can be, in general, and especially so if you are not healthy and fit. Travel has the potential to take a real toll on the body, so before you book that five-star vacation, be sure to ask yourself if you're healthy and fit enough for your journey.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Herb Gardner's A Thousand Clowns is an odd choice for a revival. It's not particularly relevant, and its "work is for squares" credo held more weight back when the American Dream signified middle-class mass uniformity and there was enough of a middle class to include the masses. But, mostly due to its success as a 1965 film starring Jason Robards as Murray Burns, unemployed comic TV writer and default foster dad to nephew Nick, there's still an audience with a fondness for this sort-of romantic sort-of comedy.
NEWS
June 23, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Jami Wintz McKeon, there were plenty of mile-markers - and traffic alerts - on the way to the top of the legal profession. There were the red-eye flights from San Francisco to Philadelphia as she recruited 160 lawyers from a failing California firm for Morgan Lewis & Bockius L.L.P., of Center City, then merely a large Northeastern firm, but soon to become a global player. There was the patronizing demeanor of male courtroom adversaries, which quickly disappeared as McKeon delivered sound legal thrashings.
NEWS
June 20, 2014 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Pennsylvania State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo has provided another clue about his plans. In a new court filing, Fumo's lawyer asked a federal judge to let the former senator travel without advance approval from his probation officer. That, Dennis J. Cogan said, would make it easier for Fumo to meet with his "many friends, business, and political contacts" in a hunt for business opportunities, including starting a "consulting business. " No further details were provided. Fumo is 71, "in poor health," and needs to find work in light of the "enormous amount" he has spent on legal bills and restitution, Cogan wrote in his filing to U.S. District Judge Ronald L. Buckwalter.
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