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Travis Tygart

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SPORTS
July 12, 2012 | Associated Press
With Lance Armstrong still digging in for a legal fight, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency on Tuesday issued lifetime sports bans to three former staff members and consultants on Armstrong's winning Tour de France teams for doping violations. Luis Garcia del Moral was a team doctor; Michele Ferrari was a consulting doctor; and Jose "Pepe" Marti (team trainer) worked for Armstrong's U.S. Postal Service and Discovery Channel squads. All had been accused by USADA of participating in a vast doping conspiracy on those teams during part or all of Armstrong's seven Tour de France victories from 1999-2005.
SPORTS
July 11, 2012 | Associated Press
AUSTIN, Texas - A federal judge handed Lance Armstrong a quick setback Monday as he went to court to save his seven Tour de France titles and his reputation as one of the greatest cyclists ever. Armstrong filed a lawsuit aimed at preventing the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency from moving ahead with charges that he used performance-enhancing drugs throughout much of his long career. But within hours, U.S. District Court Judge Sam Sparks dismissed the 80-page complaint. He said it seemed more intended to whip up public opinion in Armstrong's favor that focus on the legal argument.
SPORTS
September 25, 2012
The head of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, Travis Tygart , said he tightened security at his organization after receiving several death threats during his investigation of cyclist Lance Armstrong . "The Armstrong affair has prompted death threats against me. I received three of them, individual initiatives, in my opinion. Once again, the FBI dealt with that," Tygart said in an interview published on Monday in French sports daily L'Equipe. Tygart said his predecessor, Terry Madden , had previously received death threats during the investigation of Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative (BALCO)
SPORTS
January 15, 2013 | Associated Press
Lance Armstrong ended a decade of denial by confessing to Oprah Winfrey that he used performance-enhancing drugs to win the Tour de France, a person familiar with the situation told the Associated Press. The admission Monday came hours after an emotional apology by Armstrong to the Livestrong charity that he founded and turned into a global institution on the strength of his celebrity as a cancer survivor. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the interview is to be broadcast Thursday on Winfrey's network.
SPORTS
January 14, 2013 | Associated Press
AUSTIN, Texas - Out for a Sunday morning jog in bright sunshine, Lance Armstrong hardly looked like a man about to finally confront the doping scandal that has shadowed his storied career like an angry storm cloud. "I'm calm, I'm at ease and ready to speak candidly," Armstrong told the Associated Press , referring to his interview Monday with Oprah Winfrey. In what's been billed as a "no-holds barred" session, the cyclist is expected to reverse course after a decade of denials and apologize for doping, as well as offer a limited confession about his role at the head of a long-running scheme to dominate the Tour de France with the aid of performance-enhancing drugs.
SPORTS
April 26, 2008 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Allyson Felix is young (22), bright (she will get her degree in elementary education from Southern California on May 16), and talented (she is the best U.S. bet for Olympic gold at 200 meters in Beijing this summer). She is also committed to proving to the skeptics and the nonbelievers that someone can be successful in track and field without using performance-enhancing drugs. Felix, who will compete today in the USA vs. the World races at the Penn Relays, is a participant in Project Believe, a program developed by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency to improve the accuracy of doping tests and provide baseline body chemistry figures for track athletes.
SPORTS
June 18, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
In the latest attempt to clear her name from drug allegations, Marion Jones took a lie detector test that her lawyer says vindicates the star sprinter. Jones took the test from a certified polygraph examiner, Ronald Homer, on Wednesday and her attorney, Joseph Burton, sent the results to the United States Anti-Doping Agency yesterday. "Ms. Jones' passing of this polygraph examination fully vindicates the position we have stated to you privately, and to the public in general: that Ms. Jones has never used performance-enhancing drugs at any time in her life, whether or not such drugs relate to BALCO or any other entity or person," Burton said in a letter to USADA legal director Travis Tygart that was obtained by the Associated Press.
SPORTS
January 16, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
The deconstruction of Lance Armstrong's legend, which the disgraced cyclist built with the aid of performance-enhancing drugs and savagely defended whenever his dark secret was challenged, continued Tuesday, two days before the world at last gets to hear his confession. According to reports confirmed by Oprah Winfrey, Armstrong admitted to cheating during a 21/2-hour interview with the celebrity host that will be televised over two nights, beginning Thursday. While it would be Armstrong's first public acknowledgment that the suspicions that long shadowed his unprecedented success were true, Winfrey said he "did not come clean in the manner that I expected.
SPORTS
January 19, 2013 | By Jim Litke, Associated Press
CHICAGO - Lance Armstrong finally cracked. Not while expressing deep remorse or regrets, though there was plenty of that in Friday night's second part of Armstrong's interview with Oprah Winfrey. It wasn't over the $75 million in lost sponsorship deals, nor when Armstrong was forced to walk away from the Livestrong cancer charity he founded and called his "sixth child. " It wasn't even about his lifetime ban from competition. It was another bit of collateral damage that Armstrong said he wasn't prepared to deal with.
SPORTS
October 12, 2012 | By Eddie Pells, Associated Press
Lance Armstrong challenged the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency to name names and show what it had on him. On Wednesday, it did. The anti-doping group released a report on its case against Armstrong - a point-by-point roadmap of the lengths it says Armstrong went to in winning seven Tour de France titles that the USADA has ordered taken away. In more than 150 pages filled with allegations, the USADA names 11 former teammates - George Hincapie, Tyler Hamilton and Floyd Landis, a Lancaster County native, among them - as key witnesses.
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SPORTS
January 19, 2013 | By Jim Litke, Associated Press
CHICAGO - Lance Armstrong finally cracked. Not while expressing deep remorse or regrets, though there was plenty of that in Friday night's second part of Armstrong's interview with Oprah Winfrey. It wasn't over the $75 million in lost sponsorship deals, nor when Armstrong was forced to walk away from the Livestrong cancer charity he founded and called his "sixth child. " It wasn't even about his lifetime ban from competition. It was another bit of collateral damage that Armstrong said he wasn't prepared to deal with.
SPORTS
January 16, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
The deconstruction of Lance Armstrong's legend, which the disgraced cyclist built with the aid of performance-enhancing drugs and savagely defended whenever his dark secret was challenged, continued Tuesday, two days before the world at last gets to hear his confession. According to reports confirmed by Oprah Winfrey, Armstrong admitted to cheating during a 21/2-hour interview with the celebrity host that will be televised over two nights, beginning Thursday. While it would be Armstrong's first public acknowledgment that the suspicions that long shadowed his unprecedented success were true, Winfrey said he "did not come clean in the manner that I expected.
SPORTS
January 15, 2013 | Associated Press
Lance Armstrong ended a decade of denial by confessing to Oprah Winfrey that he used performance-enhancing drugs to win the Tour de France, a person familiar with the situation told the Associated Press. The admission Monday came hours after an emotional apology by Armstrong to the Livestrong charity that he founded and turned into a global institution on the strength of his celebrity as a cancer survivor. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the interview is to be broadcast Thursday on Winfrey's network.
SPORTS
January 14, 2013 | Associated Press
AUSTIN, Texas - Out for a Sunday morning jog in bright sunshine, Lance Armstrong hardly looked like a man about to finally confront the doping scandal that has shadowed his storied career like an angry storm cloud. "I'm calm, I'm at ease and ready to speak candidly," Armstrong told the Associated Press , referring to his interview Monday with Oprah Winfrey. In what's been billed as a "no-holds barred" session, the cyclist is expected to reverse course after a decade of denials and apologize for doping, as well as offer a limited confession about his role at the head of a long-running scheme to dominate the Tour de France with the aid of performance-enhancing drugs.
SPORTS
October 12, 2012 | By Eddie Pells, Associated Press
Lance Armstrong challenged the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency to name names and show what it had on him. On Wednesday, it did. The anti-doping group released a report on its case against Armstrong - a point-by-point roadmap of the lengths it says Armstrong went to in winning seven Tour de France titles that the USADA has ordered taken away. In more than 150 pages filled with allegations, the USADA names 11 former teammates - George Hincapie, Tyler Hamilton and Floyd Landis, a Lancaster County native, among them - as key witnesses.
SPORTS
September 25, 2012
The head of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, Travis Tygart , said he tightened security at his organization after receiving several death threats during his investigation of cyclist Lance Armstrong . "The Armstrong affair has prompted death threats against me. I received three of them, individual initiatives, in my opinion. Once again, the FBI dealt with that," Tygart said in an interview published on Monday in French sports daily L'Equipe. Tygart said his predecessor, Terry Madden , had previously received death threats during the investigation of Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative (BALCO)
SPORTS
July 12, 2012 | Associated Press
With Lance Armstrong still digging in for a legal fight, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency on Tuesday issued lifetime sports bans to three former staff members and consultants on Armstrong's winning Tour de France teams for doping violations. Luis Garcia del Moral was a team doctor; Michele Ferrari was a consulting doctor; and Jose "Pepe" Marti (team trainer) worked for Armstrong's U.S. Postal Service and Discovery Channel squads. All had been accused by USADA of participating in a vast doping conspiracy on those teams during part or all of Armstrong's seven Tour de France victories from 1999-2005.
SPORTS
July 11, 2012 | Associated Press
AUSTIN, Texas - A federal judge handed Lance Armstrong a quick setback Monday as he went to court to save his seven Tour de France titles and his reputation as one of the greatest cyclists ever. Armstrong filed a lawsuit aimed at preventing the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency from moving ahead with charges that he used performance-enhancing drugs throughout much of his long career. But within hours, U.S. District Court Judge Sam Sparks dismissed the 80-page complaint. He said it seemed more intended to whip up public opinion in Armstrong's favor that focus on the legal argument.
SPORTS
April 26, 2008 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Allyson Felix is young (22), bright (she will get her degree in elementary education from Southern California on May 16), and talented (she is the best U.S. bet for Olympic gold at 200 meters in Beijing this summer). She is also committed to proving to the skeptics and the nonbelievers that someone can be successful in track and field without using performance-enhancing drugs. Felix, who will compete today in the USA vs. the World races at the Penn Relays, is a participant in Project Believe, a program developed by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency to improve the accuracy of doping tests and provide baseline body chemistry figures for track athletes.
SPORTS
June 18, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
In the latest attempt to clear her name from drug allegations, Marion Jones took a lie detector test that her lawyer says vindicates the star sprinter. Jones took the test from a certified polygraph examiner, Ronald Homer, on Wednesday and her attorney, Joseph Burton, sent the results to the United States Anti-Doping Agency yesterday. "Ms. Jones' passing of this polygraph examination fully vindicates the position we have stated to you privately, and to the public in general: that Ms. Jones has never used performance-enhancing drugs at any time in her life, whether or not such drugs relate to BALCO or any other entity or person," Burton said in a letter to USADA legal director Travis Tygart that was obtained by the Associated Press.
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