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Trees

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NEWS
July 9, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
GALLOWAY TOWNSHIP, N.J. - The Pine Barrens surrounding Stockton University were choked with brush and a mix of trees - from white oaks and red maples to Virginia, pitch, and shortleaf pines. The conditions made for a sickly forest, vulnerable to wildfires and insect infestation, including the destructive southern pine beetle. But last week - following earlier prescribed burns to clear undergrowth - the woods along Vera King Farris Road began feeling more airy. The first of hundreds of trees came down, and sunlight again bathed the ground, making it possible for a healthier forest to take root next to the Atlantic County school.
NEWS
July 15, 2005
THIS WEEK, Fairmount Park unveiled a fancy Web site (www.fairmountpark.org), long overdue, that will help more people enjoy the parks. Its features include interactive maps of the park system and other goodies that can help people find their nearest park, get help with street tree problems, and better navigate the 9,800 acres of the system. For this project, the Fairmount Park Conservancy, an independent fund-raising arm of the park, got Microsoft, Hewlett Packard and Accenture to contribute resources to building the site.
NEWS
December 11, 1988 | By Marla Weinstein, Special to The Inquirer
Female ginkgo trees are out, so are walnut, crab apple and any tree with thorns. At the same time, pin and red oak, honey locust and sugar maples are welcome in Springfield Township. On Wednesday, the Springfield Township Council will consider a landscaping ordinance. The proposal specifies for developers what trees can and cannot be planted as well as where they can be placed and what type of soil can be used. In a township covering 29.34 square miles, inhabited by approximately 3,000 people, it would seem that there is plenty of empty land for whatever a builder wants to plant.
NEWS
December 8, 1989 | By Jan Hefler, Special to The Inquirer
Councilman Jim Johnson last night told the Riverton Borough Council that the damage from two wind storms in November would cost the borough about $2,000 in cleanup costs. Johnson, who oversees the Shade Tree Commission, said that all borough roads had been cleared of fallen trees, but that stumps were still being removed. A report presented at the work session said 16 borough-owned trees, between 20 and 125 years old, were toppled during the storms. An additional 16 trees were heavily damaged and may have to be removed.
NEWS
November 10, 1988 | By Bill Beerman, Special to The Inquirer
Backers of a plan to carve a ballfield from a stand of trees in Haddon Heights will conduct a tour of the site Saturday morning for residents who have voiced concern about the demise of the trees. The Haddon Heights Youth Association wants to locate a three-quarter-acre ballfield amid 11 acres of trees at the borough recreation complex at Eighth Avenue and High Street. Association vice president Thomas J. Ferrese invited eight concerned residents who attended last night's Borough Council meeting to join him in a tour at 9 a.m. Saturday.
NEWS
October 20, 1997 | For The Inquirer / SCOTT S. HAMRICK
Bensalem High School was the place to strike up the band on Saturday. Eighteen marching bands and guard units competed in the 25th annual "Parade of Colors" at the football stadium.
NEWS
November 13, 1988 | By Jacqueline Soltner, Special to The Inquirer
Frustration was running high at a crowded meeting of the Pennsbury Board of Supervisors last week when the debate centered, once again, on demands that trees be replaced at the Regalwood subdivision. Both residents, township officials and the developer expressed dismay that a solution had not yet been found. Almost out of desperation, it seemed, a compromise was reached. Jack Thomas, the developer, agreed to plant six oak trees. Each would be three inches in diameter. Regalwood is located on 30 acres, just east of Parkersville Road on Pocopson Road.
NEWS
July 7, 1988 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
The presence of trees in the path of proposed parking spaces has prompted the Radnor Township Planning Commission to table a request by the Main Line Federal Savings Bank. The commission on Tuesday asked officials of Main Line Federal to return next month with a more detailed plan showing all parking spaces at its administrative offices, 2 Aldwyn Center on Lancaster Avenue. The bank already has received a special exception from the Zoning Hearing Board for 150 parking spaces, some of which intrude on the 60-foot front-yard setback.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | By Relli Katz, Special to The Inquirer
Gloria Coryell, the owner of Deptford Honda, will face charges in Deptford Township Municipal Court on Nov. 3 of illegally bulldozing 35 trees to make room for expansion on the site of her motorcycle dealership. The charge, originally scheduled for a hearing last Wednesday, was continued by Judge Jeff Sprigman because Coryell's attorney, James Gabel of Pitman, said he needed time to prepare. According to Deptford planner Robert Marmion, Coryell is accused of cutting down 35 trees, most of them from 17 to 30 inches thick and 35 to 50 feet tall.
NEWS
July 31, 1988 | By Joe Fite, Special to The Inquirer
As a sewer line was being put in on Old Bethlehem Pike to service the new Lower Gwynedd Township Building and the proposed Wyndham Woods subdivision, a stack of pipe fell over on a 3-inch-wide tree. According to the township's landscaping ordinance, trees must be protected from harm during construction. Representatives of the Linpro Co., which is overseeing construction of the sewer line, apologized to the township Planning Commission on Thursday night for flattening the tree.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
June 27, 2016
Answer: Maine. Much of the state is covered in forest, with heavy growth of white pines. The pine is featured on the state seal and flag.  
NEWS
June 27, 2016
Barkskins By Annie Proulx Scribner. 736 pp. $32.00 Reviewed by Kevin Grauke Annie Proulx cares deeply about place. From the cold, wet Newfoundland coast of her Pulitzer-Prize-winning The Shipping News (1993) to the Wyoming emptiness of her story-collection trilogy of Close Range (1999), Bad Dirt (2004), and Fine Just the Way It Is (2008), Proulx's greatest strength as a writer has always been her ability to bring unforgiving landscapes - and the sorts of people who live on these landscapes - to vivid life.
NEWS
June 24, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
In the densely forested sand dunes that run along 40 blocks of Avalon's beachfront, a few trees stand apart. Japanese black pines grow taller and faster than their cohabitants in the dunes, and some of them are marked - by an orange ribbon around the trunk - for destruction. "Do you see beetles crawling on these? Do these seem dead to you?" asks resident Martha Wright, gesturing to the trees behind her. "Their only crime is that they grow tall. " The borough received a $24,000 grant in March from the state Department of Environmental Protection to remove about 100 trees that Avalon says are infested with the southern pine beetle, a small boring insect deadly to Japanese black pine trees.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2016
Make pie! Rhubarb is still going strong, and if you don't keep after it, it will keep putting up flower stalks like crazy. Either cut them off at the bottom or gently tug them away from the plant and throw them into the compost. Meanwhile, I'll keep picking the stems for pie (and harvesting heavily before the heat so they can grow back over the summer). I cut stems into ½ to 1-inch chunks, fill pie plates with them, sprinkle sugar over them, and put the whole thing overnight in a zipper bag in the freezer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2016 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
At some point during social gatherings at the Montini family's Holmesburg homes, the conversation inevitably turns to "the tree"- how big it is, how beautiful it is, and the stories it could tell. The towering American elm - more than 15 feet around, with a canopy that covers parts of six neighboring properties - rises from a corner of the family's two combined lots. Five generations of Montinis - babies in playpens and on blankets, youngsters on a makeshift skating pond, grown-ups tinkering in the shed - have enjoyed its shade since the property was purchased in 1965.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2016 | By Jennifer Adams
Q: I saw that you recommended hanging lights on the trees in one of your columns. I see this in many places. I wonder whether that has any effect on trees? Trees photosynthesize during the day and respirate at night. That needs darkness, as my understanding goes. Just curious. - R.P. A: Your concern is appreciated. I definitely avoid wrapping the cords or wires tightly because that could constrict growth of the branches, but I honestly hadn't thought of the effects the light itself might have on the trees.
NEWS
June 13, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
For the parents of Jameson Finley, there was one thing more alarming than when he coughed up branch-shaped chunks of a substance with the consistency of string cheese. The thought of what would happen if he did not cough them up. The boy, then 5, suffered from a condition called plastic bronchitis, which can lead to asphyxiation, pneumonia, and death. It can strike children who have undergone certain complex heart surgeries, as Jameson had, and it occurs on rare occasions in noncardiac patients - some of whom go years before getting the correct diagnosis.
SPORTS
June 10, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, STAFF WRITER
Trees - how and where they're placed, how they grow, how many there are - can shape a golf course as powerfully as any architect. And few things at private clubs are more contentious. Are the trees essential to the golfing experience or unnecessary impediments? Do they enhance the course's original design or transform it? Are they aesthetic assets or maintenance nightmares? Nearly a decade ago at Philadelphia Cricket Club, where the 2016 Constellation Senior Players Championship will be played this weekend on its 94-year-old Wissahickon course, members planning a restoration wrestled with all those questions.
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By Julie Shaw and Erin Serpico, STAFF WRITERS
With unexpected ferocity, a potent squall line ripped through the region around lunchtime Wednesday, knocking out power to more than 80,000 utility customers, toppling trees, and causing significant transportation delays. A wind gust of 72 mph was reported in Cumberland County, N.J., said National Weather Service meteorologist Patrick O'Hara, and gusts of 50 to 65 mph were common elsewhere on both sides of the Delaware River. The winds downed trees all over the region, with 27 of them in Haverford Township, Delaware County, alone, township emergency officials said.
NEWS
June 3, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
The glow shining into the houses of Downingtown residents on a quiet residential street is a daily reminder of what homeowners say were false assurances made by a billboard company about its electronic sign on the Route 30 Bypass. The two-sided sign, residents say, can be seen from their homes. "We were told they would not be impacted. And that's clearly not the case," said Phil Dague, a Downingtown Borough Council member. "I cannot help but feel we were misled. " Representatives of the billboard company, Catalyst Outdoor Advertising, pushed back and said they would do what they could to work with residents.
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