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Trial And Error

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2015
Q: In my new job, I travel a lot and have noticed hotels have wallpaper that's practically a solid color. Why do they bother when they could just paint the walls instead? - M.L. A: You have a good eye for detail. When I studied design, I wondered the same thing. But I discovered many reasons hotels and homeowners use certain wallpapers instead of paint. The biggest reasons include getting a custom, finished look - especially over rough walls - and achieving a deadening sound for a warmer atmosphere.
NEWS
March 15, 1988 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer TV Critic
Tonight, CBS premieres two new sitcoms: Trial and Error (Ch. 10, 8 p.m.) and Coming of Age (Ch. 10, 9 p.m.). Trial and Error is another variation on The Odd Couple. In this case, lawyer John Hernandez (Eddie Velez) is roommate to T-shirt salesman Tony Rivera (Paul Rodriguez). What they have in common is that they're childhood buddies, raised in the same Latino neighborhood in Los Angeles. In tonight's introductory episode, Hernandez joins a prestigious law firm, only to learn that the primary reason he was hired was to fill the company's minority-hiring quota.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1997 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It's got a buffoon in a suit and funny shoes representing the defense. It's got a small-town judge who's practically venting steam from his ears at the affront to justice happening in his court. And it even has director Jonathan Lynn, but no, this isn't My Cousin Vinny. It's Trial and Error, in which a bumbling, out-of-work actor (Michael Richards) takes over for his temporarily incapacitated corporate-lawyer pal (Jeff Daniels) in a case that should have been a cinch - and turns it into a fiasco.
NEWS
October 30, 1988 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nancy Putnam Howard, 72, a noted horticulturist and a past director of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, died Thursday after a long illness. Formerly of Wayne, she had lived for the past year in Beaumont at Bryn Mawr, a retirement home. "For the last 25 years or so, gardening and herbs were really her only outside interest," said her husband, Walter. "She was fascinated by herbs and wanted to promote knowledge of them. That's how she spent her spare time. " A life member of the Herb Society of America, she was honored by that group in 1986 when an annual award for horticultural achievement was given in her name.
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
IN "ABOUT TIME," a young man finds he has the time-traveler's ability to revisit moments in his own life and to make improvements, if called for. And because he's a young man, his first order of business is picking up girls. Clumsy moments in key dates can be replayed and smoothed out, until every nuance and action is exactly to the woman's liking, and the man (Domhnall Gleeson), via trial and error, becomes irresistible. You may recognize this as a riff of sorts on "Groundhog Day," and "About Time" plays like a bland version of it, with perpetually genial Gleeson subbing for the arch Bill Murray.
SPORTS
October 9, 2009
ALL WEEK LONG, Charlie Manuel answered the same question about his Game 3 starter the same way. "We don't know yet," he said on Tuesday, and again on Wednesday and again yesterday. For the first time, I believe him. I don't know if J.A. Happ's knee will be all right in time. Neither does Charlie. I don't know if Joe Blanton threw too many pitches yesterday. Neither does Charlie. I don't know whether Pedro Martinez has been off too long to throw the 90 to 100 pitches that Manuel said yesterday he could throw, if needed.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer
It could have been a bump in the road that killed Charles E. Warren 19 years ago. Or maybe it was a sharp turn. Or a sudden stop. Warren actually died of a blast fired from a double-barreled 12-gauge shotgun. But the shotgun had been specially rigged in the trunk of his car to kill the driver when the car made a sudden motion. Yesterday, a Burlington County jury got a look at a reconstructed version of the rigged gun, the original having been mistakenly destroyed by State Police in 1979, according to the prosecution.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2002 | By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
A DJ gave it to me," Monica Peters said with a laugh as she explained her "Mama Wit Da Drama" moniker. "It was kind of fitting for my personality - how I handle some issues. " Quite a stretch for listeners who know Mama as the little-girl voice that rescues them every Sunday from commercial-radio overkill with her "Cool Like Dat" show on WKDU-FM (91.7) from 3 to 6 p.m. Saturday, though, Mama will take a reprieve from the acid jazz, hip-hop and soul format to host the live segment at the Orange Moon party at Transit - a fitting appointment since she is also a performance poet.
NEWS
September 11, 1994 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lewis Haupt Conarroe, 88, a former advertising executive and author who later made a living calling square dances and sing-alongs at dude ranches, died Sept. 3 at Chandler Hall Hospice in Newtown, Bucks County. Mr. Conarroe grew up in Philadelphia and graduated from Germantown High School. After graduation in 1929 from Lafayette College in Easton, Pa., he landed a job with N.W. Ayer & Son in Center City, then one of the largest advertising agencies in the world. "He had lots of talent," said Walter Weir, a longtime friend.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2009 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was the rip-roaring Wall Street 1980s. Women were stuffing shoulder pads into power suits for a workforce on stock market steroids. The J. Geils Band was striking it rich with a more traditional spin: "Centerfold," a chart-topping ode to a classmate-turned-nude model. And in home-economics class, public school, Delaware County, Generation X was being prepared for the next two decades of boom-to-bust financial Darwinism by learning to make trail mix. I also learned to embroider purple thread onto the white felt teeth of a stuffed mouse with floppy ears.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2015
Q: In my new job, I travel a lot and have noticed hotels have wallpaper that's practically a solid color. Why do they bother when they could just paint the walls instead? - M.L. A: You have a good eye for detail. When I studied design, I wondered the same thing. But I discovered many reasons hotels and homeowners use certain wallpapers instead of paint. The biggest reasons include getting a custom, finished look - especially over rough walls - and achieving a deadening sound for a warmer atmosphere.
SPORTS
June 10, 2015 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
Wednesday is my runniversary. On June 17, 2006, I lined up to run the Run for the Health of it 5k in Medford, N.J., worried that I going to either vomit at the starting line from nerves, or run so poorly that I'd crawl to the finish. Neither of those things happened (I even finished third in my age group). Instead, I picked up a life-long habit that's pulled me through so many races I've lost count. Here are nine things I've learned in those nine years. 9.   Everyone's an expert, yet no one is.   How much water should I drink during a race?
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
IN "ABOUT TIME," a young man finds he has the time-traveler's ability to revisit moments in his own life and to make improvements, if called for. And because he's a young man, his first order of business is picking up girls. Clumsy moments in key dates can be replayed and smoothed out, until every nuance and action is exactly to the woman's liking, and the man (Domhnall Gleeson), via trial and error, becomes irresistible. You may recognize this as a riff of sorts on "Groundhog Day," and "About Time" plays like a bland version of it, with perpetually genial Gleeson subbing for the arch Bill Murray.
NEWS
July 22, 2010 | By Greg Berman
Recent weeks have brought good news about the criminal-justice system in this country. Despite hard times and dire predictions to the contrary, crime continues to decline. And the Pew Center for the States reports that the prison population has actually shrunk for the first time in more than a generation. As is often the case, however, the closer one looks, the more complicated the picture becomes. Crime may be down in lots of places, but there are many urban, low-income neighborhoods that remain fundamentally unsafe.
SPORTS
October 9, 2009
ALL WEEK LONG, Charlie Manuel answered the same question about his Game 3 starter the same way. "We don't know yet," he said on Tuesday, and again on Wednesday and again yesterday. For the first time, I believe him. I don't know if J.A. Happ's knee will be all right in time. Neither does Charlie. I don't know if Joe Blanton threw too many pitches yesterday. Neither does Charlie. I don't know whether Pedro Martinez has been off too long to throw the 90 to 100 pitches that Manuel said yesterday he could throw, if needed.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2009 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was the rip-roaring Wall Street 1980s. Women were stuffing shoulder pads into power suits for a workforce on stock market steroids. The J. Geils Band was striking it rich with a more traditional spin: "Centerfold," a chart-topping ode to a classmate-turned-nude model. And in home-economics class, public school, Delaware County, Generation X was being prepared for the next two decades of boom-to-bust financial Darwinism by learning to make trail mix. I also learned to embroider purple thread onto the white felt teeth of a stuffed mouse with floppy ears.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2002 | By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
A DJ gave it to me," Monica Peters said with a laugh as she explained her "Mama Wit Da Drama" moniker. "It was kind of fitting for my personality - how I handle some issues. " Quite a stretch for listeners who know Mama as the little-girl voice that rescues them every Sunday from commercial-radio overkill with her "Cool Like Dat" show on WKDU-FM (91.7) from 3 to 6 p.m. Saturday, though, Mama will take a reprieve from the acid jazz, hip-hop and soul format to host the live segment at the Orange Moon party at Transit - a fitting appointment since she is also a performance poet.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2000 | By Claire Furia Smith, FOR THE INQUIRER
As president and chief executive officer of Delaware Valley Financial Services Inc., Lois E. Haber said she had come a long way since she was a timid 28-year-old trying to land the company's first deal. Haber, now 50, and chairman Andrew C. Alloway Jr., 58, founded the Berwyn firm in 1978 on a shoestring budget after the annuity company they worked for closed. Today, Delaware Valley Financial administers $12 billion in annuities and life insurance products for insurers such as New York Life Insurance Co. and Allianz Life Insurance Co. of North America.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1999 | By Jack Lloyd, FOR THE INQUIRER
Jon Stewart, host of Comedy Central's The Daily Show and an occasional film actor, didn't set his sights on comedy early on - even though he was voted the student with the best sense of humor at his high school in Lawrence, N.J. "There's a definite distinction between class clown and having the best sense of humor," Stewart said proudly. But even with that reputation, he went on to four years at William and Mary College in Virginia, where he majored in psychology. Then, he became a bartender.
LIVING
November 21, 1999 | By Ketura Persellin, FOR THE INQUIRER
When I moved to Philadelphia after living in Los Angeles for many years, I knew exactly what I'd miss most - my hairdresser. And for good reason: I have yet to find a replacement. I know how important a good haircut is; in a special category with shoes and bags, it's what separates the women from the girls. I finally may be closing in on a good salon, through a process of trial and error that has been painful, frustrating, and expensive. During my first and last visit to one fancy salon in Manayunk, I was told to head for the shampoo chair before even meeting the stylist.
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