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Triathlon

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SPORTS
August 3, 2007
The Ameriprise Financial SheROX Philadelphia Triathlon, will be held Sunday, starting at 8 a.m. A women's race, it consists of a half-mile swim, 15 1/2-mile bike ride and a 3.1-mile run. The course for the race runs along the Martin Luther King Drive side of Fairmount Park. The swim starts just off Martin Luther King Drive near Parking Lot 4 and finishes near the bottom of Black Road. Participants will then ride a two-loop bike course through Fairmount Park. The loop includes some fast and flat sections on Martin Luther King Drive as well as some small, short hills.
SPORTS
August 7, 2001 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The Flyers will hold their inaugural "Trial on the Isle" in Stone Harbor, N. J., tomorrow beginning with a relay triathlon at 95th Street and Second Avenue at 10 a.m. The three-man relay teams will compete in a three-mile run, a one-mile kayak and a four-mile bike race, ending where the relay triathlon began. Flyers players expected to participate include Brian Boucher, Todd Fedoruk, Chris Therien, Rick Tocchet and Justin Williams. Flyers assistant coach Mike Stothers, Phantoms coach John Stevens, Phantoms assistant coach Don Nachbaur and some of their players will participate.
SPORTS
July 3, 1987 | By Robert Seltzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
They will test their constitutions in order to honor the Constitution. As part of the festivities commemorating the 200th anniversary of the U.S. Constitution, 200 hearty souls tomorrow will participate in the fifth annual Liberty-to-Liberty Triathlon, which starts in New York and ends in Philadelphia. For the competitors, it will not be as easy as munching on hot dogs or watching fireworks or marching in parades, but the race will provide its own kind of Fourth of July fun, said David Horning, who organized the event.
NEWS
August 9, 2001 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Hallie Terzopolos learned a valuable lesson while running, swimming and biking in a triathlon to raise money for cancer patients and research. "Never take anything for granted," the Upper Perkiomen High School senior said. "Appreciate everything you have, because others have a lot more problems and losses. " Terzopolos, who trained for four months for the event in Florida this spring, recalled running with parents racing in memory of their children and with children wearing "For mom" or "For dad" on their clothing.
NEWS
June 27, 2010
Philadelphia police were searching the Schuylkill on Saturday night for a 40-year-old Prospect Park man who disappeared in the morning while participating in a triathlon. The search was being conducted primarily around the area of West River and Montgomery Drives. The man, whose name was not released, had no history of medical problems, said Lt. David Byrne of the Southwest Detectives bureau. He had entered the water at 8:22 a.m. with about 100 swimmers in a 40- to 44-year-old age group.
SPORTS
June 27, 2010
A 19-year-old man from Kennett Square and a 43-year old woman from Riverton were the winners in the men's and women's categories of the Philadelphia Insurance sprint distance triathlon Saturday. In a sprint distance triathlon, competitors compete in a .9-kilometer swim, a 24-kilometer bike race, and 5-kilometer run. The race started at Martin Luther King Drive and Black Road, near Memorial Hall. Among the men, Nicholas Halkowski won in a time of 1 hour, 12 minutes and 4 seconds.
NEWS
October 18, 1992 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Marshalton Village Inn Triathlon may be over, but questions remain about how much of the proceeds will go to the West Bradford Fire Company. The issue came up Tuesday when supervisors chairman Ken Klunk questioned Fire Chief John Carbo about how much money the company expected to receive from George Mershon, co-sponsor of the Oct. 4 event. "I have no idea," said Carbo, who was on hand at the supervisors meeting to give the monthly fire department report. Carbo added that Mershon had said no information on proceeds would be available until January.
NEWS
October 25, 1993 | BY MIKE ROYKO
A friend slapped a magazine on my desk and pointed at a large ad. "Can you believe that?" he asked. I shared his amazement. The ad was for a food product, and it showed a couple of strapping athletes - both triathlon champions - who endorsed the food because it pumped them with energy and made them perform better. As the ad said: "Not a drink, not a bar . . . But high-carbohydrate, low- fat real food . . . " This kind of sales pitch isn't new. Athletes have been endorsing foods for years.
NEWS
August 17, 1989 | By Chris Morkides, Special to The Inquirer
When they handed out awards at Thomas Jefferson University's Fifth Annual Corporate Team Triathlon Sunday, Rohm & Haas of Philadelphia collected most of the baubles. "What kind of drugs were you using?" the announcer joked as one of the chemical corporation's teams collected its prizes. While the city entry was succeeding, Main Line corporations entered in the triathlon in West Fairmount Park didn't fare as well and weren't the butt of any of the jokes. But it didn't seem to matter.
NEWS
August 22, 1993 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It might be the first time it has ever been done - certainly the first time in South Jersey. It is a multiple-choice competition. Take your pick - either a duathlon or a triathlon - and you will still be competing against the entire field of entrants. Of course, it is all in good fun, and, appropriately, the event has been named the Do the Tri Try the Du Race. It is scheduled for 8 a.m. Sept. 4 at Cooper River Park. Race directors Bob Neeman of Cherry Hill and nationally recognized triathlete Russ Jones (formerly of Collingswood)
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SPORTS
June 29, 2015 | By Laine Higgins, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first day of the Philadelphia TriRock Triathlon was an exercise in improvisation. Because of the heavy rains, the Schuylkill was unsafe for swimming, forcing event organizers to cancel the 800-meter aquatic portion of the race at the last minute. So what was supposed to be a sprint-distance triathlon turned into a duathlon, with competitors running 1.6 miles, biking 15.7 miles, and then retying their running shoes for a final 1.6-mile run. Although the change was rather abrupt - many athletes did not find out about the swim cancellation until arriving less than an hour before the start of the race - it did not faze Scoogie Snyder, 47, and Brooke Kessler, 30, the eventual overall winners of the men's and women's divisions, respectively.
SPORTS
June 26, 2015 | By Laine Higgins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Surrounded by a verdant canopy of trees, the Fairmount Park Horticulture Center sits about 500 meters behind the finish line of the Philadelphia TriRock Triathlon on Martin Luther King Drive. To the majority of the field, the building is little more than another landmark along the historic course. But to Katherine Rosenberg, 34, and John Stolz, 39, the building is a little more important: It will host their wedding just over eight hours after the duo competes in the sprint distance triathlon race Saturday.
SPORTS
June 24, 2015 | By Laine Higgins, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Sunday mornings, Bobby Hammond takes to the road. He goes for long cruises, often taking 70-mile routes through the streets in and around his native Flanders, N.J. But Bobby Hammond still can't drive a car. The 16-year-old's preferred set of wheels is his $10,000 Blue road bike. That bicycle has carried Hammond through thousands of miles of training, sustaining the teen's dream of becoming an elite triathlete and perhaps earning a berth on the U.S. Olympic team in the 2020 Tokyo Games.
NEWS
March 12, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Age was creeping up, and Linda Garrett, 67, decided to do something radical. She went into the kitchen, propped the iPhone on a soup bowl, and recorded a plea to CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta to be part of his Fit Nation triathlon challenge. She wanted to be chosen as one of six Americans - among 200 applicants - who will be trained and equipped to compete for the first time in the grueling sport. Garrett, a retired school nurse, had never swum a lap, never clipped into a bike pedal.
SPORTS
June 24, 2014 | By Max Cohen, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Cameron Dye approached the red carpet leading to the finish line of the Philadelphia Triathlon, he stole a glance over his shoulder to check for the competition. He saw no one but spectators and pumped his fist at the welcome sight. The 29-year-old from Boulder, Colo., was looking for his chief competitor, Andy Potts. When Dye crossed the finish line in 1 hour, 48 minutes, 6 seconds, it marked the third straight time he had won the event's Olympic race. When Potts finished the race more than a minute later, it marked the third consecutive time he had finished second in the triathlon.
SPORTS
June 23, 2014 | By Max Cohen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Swimming never has been a problem for Michael Phinney, a former swimmer at Villanova. It turns out he is pretty good at cycling and running, too. Saturday morning, Phinney won the Philadelphia Triathlon's sprint race by finishing in 1 hour, 9 minutes, 18 seconds - four minutes ahead of second-place Adam Alper. The sprint course in Fairmount Park consisted of an 800-meter swim, a 15.7-mile cycling ride, and a 3.1-mile run. At Villanova, Phinney swam the 200-meter, 100, and 50 freestyles.
SPORTS
June 20, 2014 | By Max Cohen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cliff Cheek competed in his first triathlon in 2001 on the recommendation of two doctors. The first was his general physician, who noted Cheek's good health and athletic ability and suggested a triathlon as a way to expand his exercise repertoire. The second doctor was one of Cheek's friends, Richard Hamilton. Hamilton had raced in triathlons before, and he invited Cheek and another runner, Austin Meehan, to compete with him. And just like that, the trio from Jenkintown participated in their first triathlon together in Stone Harbor, N.J. They didn't stop there.
SPORTS
June 24, 2013
THE NAME of the event changed but the guy crossing the finish line looked familiar. Cameron Dye won the Johnson & Johnson Trirock Philadelphia Triathlon yesterday with a time of 1:49:02. It was his second consecutive win in the event, previously called the Philadelphia Triathlon. Dye, of Boulder, Colo., was among 1,200 athletes who hit the streets and dived in the Schuylkill River for the event, which involves a 1,500-meter swim, 24.8-mile bike ride and 6.2-mile run. Andy Potts finished 35 seconds behind Dye. Matty Reed came in third, 3 minutes and 51 seconds behind Dye. Max Fennell, who is looking to become the first African-American professional triathlete, came in 51st overall, 46th among male competitors.
SPORTS
June 24, 2013 | By Zach Helfand, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Cameron Dye grinded toward the finish line of the TriRock Philadelphia Triathlon on Sunday, the competitor he calls his "bogeyman" was gaining ground, 15 seconds - sometimes 20 - per mile. Andy Potts has haunted Dye and caught him from behind so many times that Dye didn't even entertain thoughts of winning until the final mile and a half. But by the time Dye reached the final straightaway, even Potts couldn't catch him, and Dye threw his hands up and high-fived the crowd lining the finish line on Martin Luther King Drive.
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