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Tribute Album

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LIVING
December 2, 1997 | By W. Speers This article contains material from the Associated Press, Reuters, New York Post, New York Daily News and Los Angeles Times
The Princess Diana tribute album goes on sale today and profits will go to a charity fund in her memory. But zip goes to the fund from the sales of chintzy Di dolls being offered in London's Harrods, the store owned by Dodi Fayed'sdad, Mohamed al-Fayed, who just last month banned Andrew Morton's Di bio from the store as "profiteering of the most disgusting kind. " The album, Diana, Princess of Wales - Tribute, is being released on a special label owned solely by the Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund.
NEWS
May 7, 1996 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
A host of hot releases from the Soundgarden, Vince Gill, George Michael, Color Me Badd, The Wallflowers and more should vault you into music shops this merry month of May. Here are today's disc releases: Britain's long suffering The Cure endure "Wild Mood Swings" (Elektra), their first collection of new music in four years. Super 8, an L.A. buzz band with a Chili Peppers/Fishbone flava, debuts with their self-titled album on Hollywood. Pantera pound "The Great Southern Trendkill" (EastWest)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2012
Bonnie "Prince" Billy / Michael Chapman It's hard to keep track of Will Oldham. Under his Bonnie "Prince" Billy sobriquet, he released a strong, understated album late last year, Wolfroy Goes to Town. This year, he's released one double and two single 10-inch EPs; the same number of 7-inch singles; one 12-inch EP; and one full-length album. Maybe more. Some of these have been collaborations (he did the album, The Marble Downs , with Scottish folkies Trembling Bells)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
There is the art of jazz singing before Cassandra Wilson's 1993 album Blue Light 'Til Dawn and the same art afterward. With that album, the Jackson, Miss.-born composer and singer served notice that she'd sing her original material and display exquisite taste in selecting and interpreting the music of others. She mixed in blues, country, folk, and pop. She created a misty ambience to go with that musical blend, plus a husky low register and adventurous arrangements. Each album that followed captured the Wilson texture, her knack of softly punctuating lyrics, seemingly rendering them still in midair.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1998 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Phil Ochs tribute album What's That I Hear? (Sliced Bread 1/2) can't match the marquee lineup of its Seeger counterpart, Where Have All the Flowers Gone. With old hands such as Dave Van Ronk, Eric Andersen and Arlo Guthrie sharing space with a smattering of young strummers like Sonia Rutstein and Karen Savoca, the 28-song set is an unabashedly folkie affair. But Sliced Bread co-owner Gene Shay didn't intend What's That to explore the contemporary influence of Ochs, who has been covered in recent years by artists from They Might Be Giants to Diamanda Galas.
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | By Sam Adams, FOR THE INQUIRER
Loretta Lynn opened her set at the Keswick Theater Friday night singing, "They don't make 'em like my daddy anymore," and the same goes for the country high priestess herself. Miranda Lambert and Gretchen Wilson, who covered Lynn on the 2010 tribute album Coal Miner's Daughter , may have built on her take-no-prisoners persona, but they don't have Lynn's coiled grace, the killing blow delivered with a dainty smile. At 80, she's physically frail - she cancelled a Philadelphia show in March 2011 for emergency knee surgery - and sometimes seemed to lose her way on stage.
NEWS
July 25, 2002 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Recently retired talk-show host Rosie O'Donnell is not happy with the "boring" content of her magazine and has threatened to sue Rosie. The magazine is jointly owned by O'Donnell and Gruner & Jahr USA. O'Donnell contributes her name while Gruner & Jahr produce the magazine. Since Rosie began publishing in May 2001 (replacing McCall's), O'Donnell has butted heads several times with the publishers. She doesn't like the direction of Rosie under new editor Susan Toepfer, a former People deputy managing editor.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1996 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeanie Bryson grew up surrounded by music in general and jazz in particular, but she knew very little about Peggy Lee when she was asked to do a tribute album of some of the numbers Lee did with Benny Goodman. Bryson promptly took a crash course on the subject, listening to all the Peggy Lee recordings she could find. "Her music had been around the house, but I didn't study her the way I did Dinah Washington and Carmen McRae," Bryson said from her Princeton home during a brief break in her busy touring schedule, which includes a stop at Zanzibar Blue on Sunday night.
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, the New York Daily News, the New York Times and USA Today
Timothy Laurence, the British Royal Navy commander whose stolen love letters to the married Princess Anne were grist for many a gossip column in spring when their existence became known, is leaving his duty post at Buckingham Palace, it was announced yesterday. Laurence, 35, will split next month and on Jan. 30 assume command of the frigate HMS Boxer. He has been an aide to Queen Elizabeth the last three years. Some thought that the letters had been taken by Anne's personal maid, Linda Joyce, who had a falling-out with the princess.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
There is the art of jazz singing before Cassandra Wilson's 1993 album Blue Light 'Til Dawn and the same art afterward. With that album, the Jackson, Miss.-born composer and singer served notice that she'd sing her original material and display exquisite taste in selecting and interpreting the music of others. She mixed in blues, country, folk, and pop. She created a misty ambience to go with that musical blend, plus a husky low register and adventurous arrangements. Each album that followed captured the Wilson texture, her knack of softly punctuating lyrics, seemingly rendering them still in midair.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013
Denver gypsy music foursome Devotchka broke out to a wide audience with their score to the 2006 hit indie movie Little Miss Sunshine . They were last heard from on the grandiose 2011 album 100 Lovers . Friday's show at the Trocadero is one of just two performances on a mini-tour in which the Nick Urata-fronted foursome will be trying out new material for that album's yet-to-be-recorded follow-up, accompanied by a string quartet. Brooklyn folk-pop trio Pearl and the Beard open up, on their way to the SXSW music festival in Austin, Texas.
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | By Sam Adams, FOR THE INQUIRER
Loretta Lynn opened her set at the Keswick Theater Friday night singing, "They don't make 'em like my daddy anymore," and the same goes for the country high priestess herself. Miranda Lambert and Gretchen Wilson, who covered Lynn on the 2010 tribute album Coal Miner's Daughter , may have built on her take-no-prisoners persona, but they don't have Lynn's coiled grace, the killing blow delivered with a dainty smile. At 80, she's physically frail - she cancelled a Philadelphia show in March 2011 for emergency knee surgery - and sometimes seemed to lose her way on stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Buika's smoky, throaty voice rises up from her superb new album, El Último Trago ( The Last Drink) , and the names of other incredible singers pass through your mind. Nina Simone. Miriam Makeba. Cesaria Evora. Mercedes Sosa. Amalia Rodrigues. Omara Portuondo. Buika, who comes to the Kimmel Center Tuesday, is like none - and has taken all on board. In Trago , the flexible, singular voice of María Concepción Balboa Buika combines elements of Afro-Cuban, flamenco, pan-American, and even Arabic music in a set of emotional songs played live in the studio with an all-star lineup of world musicians.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2003 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
When asked to name a perfect pop song, Chris Collingwood comes up with six: the Beach Boys' "Good Vibrations," Tom Petty's "Refugee," the Romantics' "What I Like About You," the Bangles' "Walk Like An Egyptian," Bruce Springsteen's "Born to Run," and Jimmy Webb's "Wichita Lineman. " Fine choices all, but if Collingwood weren't such a modest guy, he might have added "Bright Future in Sales" or "Hey Julie" or maybe "All Kinds of Time" to the list. Those songs are from Welcome Interstate Managers, the new album by Fountains of Wayne, the heavenly guitar-pop quartet he leads along with fellow guitarist and songwriter Adam Schlesinger.
NEWS
July 25, 2002 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Recently retired talk-show host Rosie O'Donnell is not happy with the "boring" content of her magazine and has threatened to sue Rosie. The magazine is jointly owned by O'Donnell and Gruner & Jahr USA. O'Donnell contributes her name while Gruner & Jahr produce the magazine. Since Rosie began publishing in May 2001 (replacing McCall's), O'Donnell has butted heads several times with the publishers. She doesn't like the direction of Rosie under new editor Susan Toepfer, a former People deputy managing editor.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2001 | By Nick Cristiano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For Dale Watson, great music came at a great price. On Dec. 28, the Texas honky-tonker tried to kill himself by downing sleeping pills and vodka in an Austin- area hotel room. It had been 3 1/2 months since the death of his fiancee, Terri Herbert, in a car crash, and the 38-year-old singer was despondent. Fortunately, his road manager found him - "I was pretty far gone," a subdued Watson recalled recently from his Austin home - and after committing himself to a state hospital, he was found to be suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder.
NEWS
October 17, 2000 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
VICTORIA WILLIAMS PLUS MARK OLSON, 8 p.m. tomorrow at the Painted Bride Art Center, 230 Vine St. Tickets: $22.50. Info: 215-925-9914. Victoria Williams, the talent headlining tomorrow at the Painted Bride, is definitely an old soul in a young body, and a unique taste definitely worth sampling. Her fragile, wispy, Louisiana drawl sounds like something you might hear coming out of a windup Victrola. And while the artist deploys modernistic electric guitars and keyboards, soulful horns and sophisticated string arrangements, her original songs have a quaint, lullaby elegance and country-tinged lyricism that evokes simpler times and imagery.
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